Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
September 01, 2014, 03:54:16 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Raid on Imported Honey By Homeland Security  (Read 2947 times)
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« on: January 01, 2009, 02:07:01 AM »

This is worth reading.  A raid on illegally imported Chinese honey right here in Washington state.
It gives a little insight to just how big a problem it really is.  Gives the term "Chinese Laundry" a whole new meaning.

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/394053_honey30.asp


« Last Edit: January 01, 2009, 08:52:20 AM by buzzbee » Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
tlynn
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 529

Location: Tampa Bay, Florida


« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2009, 06:17:45 AM »

Great article.  I'd make reprints and use as a marketing tool for our honey.

I can't remember the last time I read about something good coming out of China.  Poisoned pet food, poisoned milk.  I read somewhere that by 2015 in the US we will import 30% of our food from there.  How scary is that?  I saw garlic at a store recently, marked from China and asked the produce manager why they were getting garlic from China.  It's cheaper than garlic grown in the US he said.  Imagine that...produce from thousands of miles away is cheaper than what we can grow here.  If this is globalization I am going to expand my garden!  Another reason to support local farmers' markets and your organic food stores. 

Maybe we'll be soon looking for a "grown in the USA sticker!"

Logged
BjornBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3773


Location: Lewisberry, PA


« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2009, 08:29:49 AM »

I can not get the site to come up.....  huh
Logged

www.bjornapiaries.com
www.pennapic.org
Please Support "National Honey Bee Day"
Northern States Queen Breeders Assoc.  www.nsqba.com
buzzbee
Ken
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 5439


Location: North Central PA


WWW
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2009, 08:52:42 AM »

The link is fixed Smiley
Logged
BjornBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3773


Location: Lewisberry, PA


« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2009, 08:57:38 AM »

Good article buzz. But it must be a different one as it really said nothing about a raid on Chinese honey.

Ok, got the other one. Thank you.

Buzz,
Can you put that other link back up? I would like to print it out and have lost it.  Thank you.
Logged

www.bjornapiaries.com
www.pennapic.org
Please Support "National Honey Bee Day"
Northern States Queen Breeders Assoc.  www.nsqba.com
Greg Peck
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 388


Location: Harrisburg Pa


WWW
« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2009, 10:55:24 AM »

Bjorn The story you wanted might be one of these http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/specials/honey/
Logged

"Your fire arms are useless against them" - Chris Farley in Tommy Boy
Semper Fi
www.gregsbees.com www.secondfast.com/gregsworkshop/ www.secondfast.com/bees
BjornBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3773


Location: Lewisberry, PA


« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2009, 10:59:05 AM »

Bjorn The story you wanted might be one of these http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/specials/honey/


Thank you Greg.
Yes, it's the one "Experts call for better U.S. standards".
Logged

www.bjornapiaries.com
www.pennapic.org
Please Support "National Honey Bee Day"
Northern States Queen Breeders Assoc.  www.nsqba.com
JP
The Swarm King
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 11668


Location: Metairie, Louisiana

I like doing cut-outs, but I love catching swarms!


WWW
« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2009, 12:12:14 PM »

Thanks for posting the article Brian. On a brighter note, I have a chinese customer that buys my honey by the gallon. She likes the real stuff. She claims she needs the real stuff for good health and I want her to be healthy of course!

I should get some labels to put on her containers that say "made in USA"


...JP
Logged

"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus
and
http://picasaweb.google.com/112138792165178452970

My Youtube videos can be viewed here: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=JPthebeeman&aq=f

My website JPthebeeman.com http://www.jpthebeeman.com/jpthebeeman/
manfre
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 143

Location: Cary, NC


WWW
« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2009, 12:26:17 PM »

The need for foreign honey could be removed in under 5 years by simply blocking all honey imports. The price of honey in the US would rise and give the incentive for more beeks to take the step from hobbyist to commercial. Supply would go up and prices would drop. Probably not to the current levels, but at least it would be untainted, undiluted honey in the containers.
Logged

Backyard Apiary - My adventures in beekeeping.
Brewed By Us - A social site for homebrewers (beer, mead, etc.) to share recipes and brew journals.
JP
The Swarm King
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 11668


Location: Metairie, Louisiana

I like doing cut-outs, but I love catching swarms!


WWW
« Reply #9 on: January 01, 2009, 12:29:45 PM »

The need for foreign honey could be removed in under 5 years by simply blocking all honey imports. The price of honey in the US would rise and give the incentive for more beeks to take the step from hobbyist to commercial. Supply would go up and prices would drop. Probably not to the current levels, but at least it would be untainted, undiluted honey in the containers.

Well, we would like to hope so anyway.


...JP
Logged

"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus
and
http://picasaweb.google.com/112138792165178452970

My Youtube videos can be viewed here: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=JPthebeeman&aq=f

My website JPthebeeman.com http://www.jpthebeeman.com/jpthebeeman/
Shawn
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1214

Location: Lamar Colorado


« Reply #10 on: January 01, 2009, 01:39:28 PM »

Great article. Thanks for posting!
Logged
BjornBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3773


Location: Lewisberry, PA


« Reply #11 on: January 01, 2009, 01:46:23 PM »

The need for foreign honey could be removed in under 5 years by simply blocking all honey imports. The price of honey in the US would rise and give the incentive for more beeks to take the step from hobbyist to commercial. Supply would go up and prices would drop. Probably not to the current levels, but at least it would be untainted, undiluted honey in the containers.

Well, we would like to hope so anyway.


...JP

If one would only knew the truth, you would think twice about buying honey from that next farm stand you run across while driving down that country lane........ shocked 
Logged

www.bjornapiaries.com
www.pennapic.org
Please Support "National Honey Bee Day"
Northern States Queen Breeders Assoc.  www.nsqba.com
KONASDAD
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2011


Location: Cherry Hill, N.J.


« Reply #12 on: January 01, 2009, 01:51:58 PM »

This is a great article and it was already posted in article section as well. Its importanta and belongs in general section.
I sent link to all of my customers as a marketing tool. I really like the fact that Sue-Bee is caught up in this as they are every where.
Logged

"The more complex the Mind, the Greater the need for the simplicity of Play".
Big John
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 114


Location: Greenup Co., Kentucky


« Reply #13 on: January 01, 2009, 04:36:06 PM »

Another good reason to make country of origin labels mandatory on ALL products!
Logged

"Semper Fi"
BjornBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3773


Location: Lewisberry, PA


« Reply #14 on: January 01, 2009, 04:45:55 PM »

I've often wondered about trying to be "domestic" for year. Something to see if one could just buy nothing but american products, and keep a record of one's problems. I used to see "Buy American" bumper stickers, but it seemed they were just marketing for "Buy Union" which meant "Buy Crap!"

Anymore, it seems "buy American" or buy local, beyond food products on small scale, is not even seen. A real shame.  But I guess it's all global now for most things. Steel workers want all steel to be American made. And I suppose it's the same with clothing, honey, and anything else. Each group looks at their own small market, but think nothing of those markets outside their own profession or product thay are involved with. Price is still king for most things with most people. Reading the fine print, even if the country of origin was mentioned, would mean little to most.
Logged

www.bjornapiaries.com
www.pennapic.org
Please Support "National Honey Bee Day"
Northern States Queen Breeders Assoc.  www.nsqba.com
tlynn
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 529

Location: Tampa Bay, Florida


« Reply #15 on: January 01, 2009, 08:34:34 PM »

Anymore, it seems "buy American" or buy local, beyond food products on small scale, is not even seen. A real shame.  But I guess it's all global now for most things. Steel workers want all steel to be American made. And I suppose it's the same with clothing, honey, and anything else. Each group looks at their own small market, but think nothing of those markets outside their own profession or product thay are involved with. Price is still king for most things with most people. Reading the fine print, even if the country of origin was mentioned, would mean little to most.

I agree for the most part.  We choose our food based on whether or not it's organic, and price is irrelevant.  That's non-negotiable.  For most everything else, availability is the key factor and probably price.  I would generally be willing to pay pay more for an equal American made product, but they just aren't available.  I do remember buying these nice US made wood clamps for like twice the money of some Chinese made clamps, but that's a rare exception.  Go to Home Depot and see all the "Workforce" brand items everywhere and all made in China.  How far do I have to search to find any consumer electronic product that isn't made in China, or even more remotely, is made in the US?  Try finding something made in the US in that good old patriotic American company, WalMart.  I walked around in a WalMArt one day looking for something made in the US and the only 2 things I found besides foods were American flags and a stationary set.  And I wouldn't be surprised if the flag fabric was made in Pakistan!  Now that I think of it, most of their rifles, shotguns and ammo probably would be US made, but I didn't look through those.

China has been buying our bonds we've been selling to keep our economy propped up so we can continue to have the money to keep buying all that crap they can keep making that's bulging from the shelves.  What a crazy, unsustainable cycle!  I think it's all changing.  2009 is going to be an interesting year.

Forgive me...getting a bit off topic smiley
Logged
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 15107


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #16 on: January 01, 2009, 09:09:57 PM »

Quote
The need for foreign honey could be removed in under 5 years by simply blocking all honey imports. The price of honey in the US would rise and give the incentive for more beeks to take the step from hobbyist to commercial. Supply would go up and prices would drop. Probably not to the current levels, but at least it would be untainted, undiluted honey in the containers.

nice idea, but then you have to get around regulations, labor costs, etc. that keep us prices high.  the cost of us labor is one of the things that prices us out of markets.  here, our min. wage just went up again today.  now 2nd highest in the us behind washington. 

other thing that happens is that you get retaliatory tariffs or blocking of our exports.  that keeps us from getting things we need and want., and from selling our products overseas.
remember when countries quit importing our beef?  how about if they skip washigtons apple crops next year, or oregons hay sales? 

when i was young, made in japan or made in korea meant cheap crap.  they adjusted their markets to fit our demands and now produce things of better quality than the us does, and for a better price. even if the price is not better, for example their cars, the quality is. 

 the answer if for the us to be competitive, not protectionist. 
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
manfre
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 143

Location: Cary, NC


WWW
« Reply #17 on: January 01, 2009, 10:31:41 PM »

Quote
The need for foreign honey could be removed in under 5 years by simply blocking all honey imports. The price of honey in the US would rise and give the incentive for more beeks to take the step from hobbyist to commercial. Supply would go up and prices would drop. Probably not to the current levels, but at least it would be untainted, undiluted honey in the containers.

nice idea, but then you have to get around regulations, labor costs, etc. that keep us prices high.  the cost of us labor is one of the things that prices us out of markets.  here, our min. wage just went up again today.  now 2nd highest in the us behind washington. 

other thing that happens is that you get retaliatory tariffs or blocking of our exports.  that keeps us from getting things we need and want., and from selling our products overseas.
remember when countries quit importing our beef?  how about if they skip washigtons apple crops next year, or oregons hay sales? 

when i was young, made in japan or made in korea meant cheap crap.  they adjusted their markets to fit our demands and now produce things of better quality than the us does, and for a better price. even if the price is not better, for example their cars, the quality is. 

 the answer if for the us to be competitive, not protectionist. 

I agree that competition is important, but unregulated competition is not. We essentially have unregulated competition because of our inability to properly inspect the volume of imports. Instead of blocking imports, a better option would be to provide enough staff and equipment to Customs, but I don't think that will ever happen.
Logged

Backyard Apiary - My adventures in beekeeping.
Brewed By Us - A social site for homebrewers (beer, mead, etc.) to share recipes and brew journals.
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 15107


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #18 on: January 01, 2009, 10:34:53 PM »

Quote
a better option would be to provide enough staff and equipment to Customs

sure, and to inspect every toy, container, and bit of mail that comes through.  we could have spent TSA money to put more customs people in, but instead created another government black hole of inefficiency.
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
rdy-b
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2211


Location: clayton ca


« Reply #19 on: January 01, 2009, 10:49:09 PM »

The need for foreign honey could be removed in under 5 years by simply blocking all honey imports. The price of honey in the US would rise and give the incentive for more beeks to take the step from hobbyist to commercial. Supply would go up and prices would drop. Probably not to the current levels, but at least it would be untainted, undiluted honey in the containers.

Well, we would like to hope so anyway.


...JP

If one would only knew the truth, you would think twice about buying honey from that next farm stand you run across while driving down that country lane........ shocked 
what would that be -its all good down my country lane cool-thanks for the warning cool RDY-B
Logged
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.4 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page August 18, 2014, 06:16:27 AM
anything