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Author Topic: Kathy, borage and so on  (Read 1245 times)
Cindi
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« on: December 30, 2008, 12:12:32 PM »

hey, i just found out that my feed store carries buckwheat.  i won't have to order it from the farm store this year!! 
cindi, i never planted the rest of the borage, so it will go in this spring.  make sure you take starts and seeds when you move!!!!


Oh Kathy, a whole new ball of worms......plant for buckwheat for surely. OK.....I added some of my thoughts to this thread, but it wound up being too long and it was kind of off-topic to the original data that Light started it with, so I have to make a new thread, I hijacked this thread too badly and that would not be a great thing, me thinks.....go to the topic I made for you entitled, "Kathy, borage and so on"

But, you are going to have your socks knocked off when you see how many thousands of buckwheat seeds will be germinating from your last years crop.  I haven't planted buckwheat again since that first year I planted it, and it comes up like the wildfire.  But, don't totally depend on the last year's crop to self-seed, buy more, plant more, buy more, plant more, oops, did I repeat that thing, hee, hee, smiling.

If you need more seed of anything, girl, say the word.....spring is just around that corner you know.  I can't wait, yeah, yeah, yeah, the most exciting time of the year, yeah, yeah, yeah!!!  Oh dear.

I have a fridge full of seeds and more seeds to bring with me when we move.  AND....listen to this.

I have a girlfriend that used to do the greenhousey thing with me.  We were those partners-in-crime and would work our greenhouses together, but from a distance.  We would share perennials, annuals, and did all kinds of interesting stuff together, hee, hee.

She no longer has her little nursery business, just like me.  Too much work, not enough money.  But....she still has all her paraphernalia, and that is lots.  Last year I had to get a whole whack of the 2.5 inch perennial deep pots for cuttings that I did, trays, and a whole bunch of stuff.  I saw in her field a great mound of big pots, these are the big pots that small trees come in. Think they may be like 12 gallon pots or something like that.  Big....I know that she wants my honey, I have saved her a gallon, but she hasn't come to get and pay for it yet.

Now you have to picture my place....I am ramblin', but I got some stuff to say.  I have spent these 18 years on our property cultivating, clearing, enriching, nurturing the soils and gardens around here.  And, let me tell you, with the horse manures over the past years, the enormous compost piles, from all the stuff from my massive lawns (which take about 2.5 hours to mow), the organic materials that come from the trees and flowers in the fall, chickenyard matter, and that list goes on, I have enriched soil.  I have several vegetable gardens that are so full of that enriched loam that the earth goes probably at least 12-18 inches deep with this beautiful, black gold.

I have hundreds upon hundreds of perennials that I have purchased, started, and so on and so on.  My process over the next couple of months is to select many of these small sub-shrubs and perennials to come with me.  I will leave most of the beauty of these plants for the next owner, but these plants require to be thinned out anyways.  As perennials are, they thrive and grow much better if they are thinned/cut out every so often.   Anyone that will purchase our home will have to be a workaholic.  No one that isn't would even be interested in this place, they will see, the moment they step foot on the property.

Well, where was I?  Right.  With these plants that I will be digging up, they will be going into these 12 gallon pots that I am going to get from my pal.  Each of these big pots will have the nutrient-rich soil in them from my big vegetable gardens.  I could never deplete the amount of earth that is in these gardens, there is just too much of it and too deep, I exaggerate not -- so I feel 100% OK about filling up these pots with my soil.  18 years of amending soil, can't leave it all behind, hee, hee. 

THis is going to be an enormous undertaking.  I also have 10 blueberry bushes that are now in their 4th year.  Unless the next owner wants to pay me extra for these bushes, they are being dug up and held in burlap until our move.  Our climate is wet enough that the plants can sit for months in burlap, after being put back in the hole from whence they came.  This list of stuff goes on and on.  Even down to the walnut trees that I planted two years ago, they can still be readied for moving.  Oh brother.

When we were at my Daughters in Grindrod for my birthday the beginning of October, I took some heel cuttings from many of her black Elderberry bushes http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sambucus_nigra.  These are the edible Elderberry (not the red species that grows so prolifically on my property and are poisonous).  The bees goes nuts on the Black Elderberry and the black berries make the most fantastic jams imaginable.  It matures in the fall and the berries are an excellent source of food for late fall feeding of birds.  So these must be dug up and put into pots too to take.  Oh brother, sounds like I am in for a whole lot-o-work.  Oh well, good for the body and soul, I do so love to work outside,  rolleyes cool Smiley Smiley Smiley   Have a wonderful and most awesome day, love and live life well, health.  Cindi

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« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2008, 12:48:26 PM »

i'm good on seeds, thanks.  boy, you do have your work cut out for you.  i see multiple trips to your new place in your future.  the garden stuff is more important that stuff like furniture smiley!

i tried transplanting some fireweed this fall.  i don't know how that will work.  i just moved a couple of plants loaded with seed.  i hope it will either spread root, or reseed, but i have not had good luck with the fireweed seeds that i tried to plant.
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« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2008, 05:19:23 PM »

Cindi,

You are moving? 
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« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2008, 07:04:30 PM »

i wonder if the buckwheat seeds will be able to overcome the grass that grew back in when the buckwheat died back?  i was so happy with the small amount i planted last year, i plan to turn a whole pasture over to it this  year.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

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« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2008, 07:42:33 PM »

Oh Cindi, that sounds like a whole lot of wonderful work!  Amazing that you can become so attached to plants. I don't mean that in a bad way,but in a nurturing of living things sort of way..I hope you know what I mean!  I am that way too with most every living thing here on my land.well, maybe not moles & slugs.. evil Most of my plants are from someone I know, cuttings, seeds, divisions. Most of the people are now dead but their plants live on & I think of em every time I see them.  Elderberry's..didn't Monte Python have something..hmm Your Father/Mother smells of Elderberry's? You will have so many memories of your old land as you place your transplants into the new.  It will help you feel settled & at home more quickly! Don't work too hard, there is time left till spring. Blueberries don't like to be messed with so this winter sleep time is perfect for wrapping em up.  Most other perennials are quite forgiving thank goodness!  You will have to "borrow" your daughters horse to help w/your new compost pile, or bring a trash can full of your present to jumpstart. How exciting, a new landscape to make your own, new growing micro climate, maybe even new types of plants..woo hoo!  J
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« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2008, 10:05:05 PM »

Keep in mind, Cindi, those pots will be heavy if you fill them full.  Also, sometimes real estate deals can get sticky over plants, make sure any potential buyer realizes you're taking certain things with you.  If you're just dividing, that's one thing, but stuff like those blueberry plants are valuable and should be duly noted on any paperwork.
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Cindi
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« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2009, 01:48:08 PM »

Sharon, I had made a pretty lengthy post in the coffee house forum, this is the link to it.  There is a couple of threads in that post that tell of what I am up to.  Sometimes the coffee house has some pretty interesting stuff in it.  I never much have looked at that forum when I first joined our forum, because I was so into reading about the bees, but there really is some cool topics, smiling. 

Link:

http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php/topic,18929.0.html

i tried transplanting some fireweed this fall.  i don't know how that will work.  i just moved a couple of plants loaded with seed.  i hope it will either spread root, or reseed, but i have not had good luck with the fireweed seeds that i tried to plant.


Kathy, I know about your Fireweed.  Remember when you and I were both gathering that seed, telling each other of how we looked like that white fluffy person, all covered in the fluff?  I do, I am sure you do too, go back into the cobwebs of your mind, I have to go back in there many times too, and my cobwebs are getting thicker and thicker, hee, hee.

My Fireweed seeds that I spent so much time gathering, never did do anything either, just like your experience.  EXCEPT.  Last year in the middle of summer, right smack dab in the middle of the horse pasture out back, in amongst a pile of timber that wasn't removed from our property, there was several fireweed plants, growing like there was no tomorrow.  Best I can figure here is that some of the weed seeds that I spread around, all over the back, and what the  birds didn't get, grew.  Maybe the birds didn't find the seeds because of the location of the seeds, and they had a chance to grow.  So, they grew, there must have been some form of earth between these hunks of timber, strange.  This is what the group looked like, there was actually two groups.

See the light pink tall flowers (for those who don't know what Fireweed looks like).



Kathy, I think that digging up the Fireweed plant, seeds and all was a great idea.  That is another way of propagating Fireweed, I have read about that method too.  I think that the seeds that were held on that plant will have drifted here and there on the wind and you may have Fireweed showing up all over the place.  Maybe, Fireweed seeds also require a good deal of cold weather to enable them to germinate, so it may depend on what time of year the seed was spread by you (and me).  Maybe the weather just was not cold enough.

I know with the Sea Holly, the seed does not do well, unless it is held in the cold for 4 or five days.  I hold seed like that in my refrigerator.  Many seeds of plants, such as the Snapdragon species must be frozen for about 48 hours or longer to break the seed dormancy.  Seeds are very strange things.

Now Kathy, about the buckwheat seeds coming through the grasses that have grown and died back throughout the winter.  I don't know.  Seriously.  Did you ever get a chance to look at the buckwheat as it germinated?  Those are extremely tender little seedlings.  Even buckwheat itself is a very "soft" stemmed plant.  I am not sure that the seed would poke through the grasses before the grasses began to grown.  Buckwheat....I am pretty sure that it would germinate long after the grasses have started to grow and would probably be smothered out, it just seems to me, but I could be wrong.  Kathy, turn your entire pasture over and then broadcast that Buckwheat, and make sure that you take a picture of these beautiful fields of fragrant white blossoms, that would make for some very beautiful, beautiful, pictures.

Oh so many comments to make.  I must get on with it, but don't want it to be a book.

Ann, oh yeah, those pots will be freakin' heavy, I surely do know that, it will be a two person job to move those things, probably just as heavy as a deep full of honey, I can't lift a full deep of honey, now a deep of brood and bees, no problemo!!!  Oh yes, I am also fully aware of how sticky real estate deals can get, with regard to plants.  That is why.....as soon as the ground thaws here, the ones that I am not dividing, but removing from the ground, will be long, gone out of the ground, long before any potential purchasers will even get to have a look at our place.  I have some very special sub-shrubs and perennials, as Jody said, ones that have been given to me, and that person is no longer.  The blueberry plants, yes, coming or staying, they WILL be noted on paper.  My intention is to take them.  BUT....again, I am moving to a totally different climate.  Our wet lower mainland is a perfect place for growing blueberries, as they love moisture.  I am moving to a dry, dry place, I don't know how they will fare, of course there is irrigation, but if the plants would not be happy moving with me, they will not coming with me, I think of their feelings too, and would not want to "force" them to a pretended happiness, hee, hee.  Anything that is in pots, any potential purchasers will be made fully aware that they are coming with me.  But there will be so much left behind, they will be happy.  I will not take everything from here, as I said, most of the plants coming are going to be divisions of those mother plants.  Eeeks!!!

Oh Jody, that Monte Python thing, wonder what that was all about.  The red Elderberry bushes that grow here and are poisonous, have a very beautiful fragrance with the creamy white umbrels of flowers.  The Black Elderberry bushes' flowers are even more strongly scented, so I have heard.  I know how sweet the red Elderberry smells, I can only imagine the fragrance of the black Elderberry.  Jody, I am attached to my plants, very deeply, perhaps because they have grown with me, in so many ways, I have many from years and years ago, many.....I have rhododendron bushes that are now about 15 feet tall and wide.  I first planted those when we moved here.  They were in two gallon pots and I could lift them up so easily.  Now these are beautiful and the most wonderful trees, they sit along the back of our pool bordering the bush.  I cannot take them with me, they will stay, and yes, I will kiss them all goodbye.  Hee, hee, smiling.  My oldest Daughter has 5 horses, plus her Sister's horse that now lives with them.  That is one whole lotta horse puckies!!!

Look at this picture of the pool.  At the back, look at the two identical smaller trees, they show up in the picture on either side of the street lamp.  Those are a lavender coloured rhododendron, beautiful in the spring.



Have a most wonderful and awesome day, love and live life, health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2009, 02:05:14 PM »

Cindi, a hand truck will make moving those big pots so much easier, well, until they need to go UP on the truck! You can even ratchet strap em on so you can drag em around all by yourself! The dryness & blueberries, you will just have to test that.  Also, the PNW soil is mostly acidic & peat-mossy like, at least on this side of the mtns, don't know about the other side. Bberries like the boggy acidic soil.  Maybe you can drag a plant or two to your daughters to see what happens before you move??  Fireweed seems to thrive in clear cut areas around here so maybe the logs/wood debris is instrumental in some way, possibly like you said about the animals not finding & eating the seeds!  Watching your plants grow from tiny to magnificent is like watching your children grow in a way.  My Rhody's are like yours. Planted em the 2nd year I was here (1984) There are pics in my picassa album, the links are somewhere in the forum here.  When they, lilac & golden chain trees are blooming it is a sight to behold!  You mentioned seeds on another post, I will buy good beeplant seeds from you if you need to get rid of some! Happy to hear you will have lots of poo to work with, wonderful stuff, just wonderful!  J
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Cindi
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« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2009, 02:16:25 PM »

Jody, some good thoughts going on there!!!   A handtruck, got one, just never thought about it yet, and yes, a rachet strap, got a couple of them too, I am pretty independent, just like you. Jody, I don't think that there will be time to test the blueberries bushes up there.  I just need to speak to some nursery operators in the area and figure out.  Yes, we have that acid soil the bushes love, and I have always given them lots of peat tucked in around their homes, mixed with manures.  They thrive and grow so beautifully.  Last year was a good year for these plants, they are getting so much bigger now and are going to be good yielders.  They offered about 1-1/2 gallons per plant, so last year was the beginning of a display of what they will offer to me in the future.  The prior year they only provided a cup or two, so they are well on their way.  I am sure that I could grow them up north, but may take some extra work, that I love anyways, hee, hee.  I do have to check out the pictures on your picassa site, just haven't had the time to look at all of them.  Have a wonderful and most awesome day, girl, life, health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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