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Author Topic: End bars of frames...  (Read 2256 times)
beebiz
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« on: February 04, 2005, 04:12:49 AM »

I have a question about the end bars (the parts that connect the top and bottom bars) of a frame.  This may sound simple or silly, but I just don't know!  According to the "Dadant Frame Construction" plans that are at beesource.com the top of the end bar is 3/8" thick x 1 3/8" wide.  As you look down the end bar (facing the 1 3/8" side), there are curved cuts on the right and left side of the end bar that narrow the balance of the length of the side bar to 1 1/8" wide.

Now here's my question.  Do these curved "narrowing cuts" HAVE to be curved?  Or, can I make the cuts on 45 degree angles between the 1 3/8" and the 1 1/8" widths?  Or better still, can I cut 90 degree angles from the 1 3/8" width over to the 1 1/8" width and then turn the cuts another 90 degrees downward (kind of a down, over, down "dog leg" cut) for the balance of the 1 1/8" width?  Or even better still, does it really mater how it is done?

Like I said, it may sound a little silly, but I know that everything I have read says that everything has to be so precise when building your own woodenware, and I don't want to make a mess!!

Thanks in advance for your help.
Robert
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« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2005, 06:37:10 AM »

It doesn't really matter, I have had some with 45s and never really noticed any difference.

I would probably stay away from 90s,  seems like there would be a better chance for splitting if your top bar is a little tight.  Just a thought though.
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2005, 06:46:38 AM »

The idea of the wide part at the top is for the spacing between combs. The reduced part Is so the bees don't propolize them together all the way down. It would be fine to angle them or slope them as long as you pay attention to the "Bee Spacing". If too wide they will build comb in there and start causing a mess. If too narrow then they will stick them together making it harder to seperate.

If you are using a dado blade I'm sure you could trim the part off and stop at the point you need to and have the fancy curve. I think I read where someone uses a joiner. But straight angles would probably be fine.
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Beth Kirkley
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« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2005, 11:06:00 AM »

I'm in agreement with all that. I have seen how bees are particular about "bee space", but the sides of the frame at the bottom doesn't really involve that bee space. It's more for what was mentioned - so they don't glue things together. So it's really for your convenience, rather than theirs.
I also agree that it would be best to avoid the 90 degree turn because it could weaken the frame.

Beth
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beebiz
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« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2005, 03:36:16 AM »

Thanks to everyone for your help.  I had a sneeky feeling that the "curve" in the cuts mattered very little, but as I said, I didn't know for sure.

Again, thanks to all who replied!

Have a great weekend,
beebiz
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NCSteve
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« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2005, 08:06:02 AM »

Quote
I had a sneeky feeling that the "curve" in the cuts mattered very little, but as I said, I didn't know for sure.


 Those cuts were just made with a router, thats why they look the way they do.
 A router mounted in a router table makes fast work on the side bars. Stopping the side bar at a specific point creates that flare with the router bit.
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Jay
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« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2005, 03:18:31 PM »

Also could be a jointer. A jointer would allow you to shape a larger piece like that and then slice it up to make the individual side bar pieces. Cheesy
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