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Author Topic: Newest Addition to the Homestead  (Read 4436 times)
Kris^
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Location: Williamstown, NJ


« on: January 30, 2005, 08:41:38 PM »

It took us two days in the cold and snow, but we finally completed the second addition to our little "intensive farming" operation:



We built this second one with a keen roof vent feature (unlike the first one, which has roll-up side walls):



Last spring we raised about a half-season's worth of bedding flats for late season.  This will be our first season running both hot and cold frames, and our first year to do a complete season of flats from the start in early March, plus all our hanging baskets, too.

-- Kris
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Horns Pure Honey
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Location: Illinois


« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2005, 09:38:42 PM »

very very nice kris.
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Ryan Horn
Beth Kirkley
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« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2005, 11:15:16 PM »

That IS nice! I'm so jealous! Smiley What all do you grow? Is it all for your own use, or do you sell some of it? In what for do you sell if you do - starter plants or half grown in pots or fully grown veggies and such?

Beth
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Violacea
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« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2005, 05:15:14 PM »

Wow,  shocked  How big is that thing? Oh I so want a bigger green house.
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Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2005, 05:23:50 PM »

I know, it stinks to have a small green house. But I guess a small green house is better than no green house. bye
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Ryan Horn
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« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2005, 05:40:54 PM »

Sooo true, can't use mine yet, Tongue needs too much repair, but I'm working on it.  At least I have one.  Cheesy
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buzz
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Location: Hayden Lake, ID


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« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2005, 05:43:52 PM »

Man, I think that is bigger than my house!!! How long is it?
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Scott
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"If you have no money and you have few possessions, if you have a dog you are still rich"
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"Forgiveness is easier to get than permission"
Kris^
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Location: Williamstown, NJ


« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2005, 08:46:38 PM »

Quote from: Beth Kirkley
What all do you grow? Is it all for your own use, or do you sell some of it?


The two houses are each 30 feet by 96 feet.  We grow decorative and ornamentals, for the most part, all for sale.  My partner owns a farm market, and for the first few years we bought all the plants from other growers to sell.  We've slowly been growing more and more of our own product.  We started by growing fall mums in pots, and now we can supply the market's full seasonal quota, about 5,000, on our own.  When we finished the first greenhouse last spring, we only grew the late spring supply of annual flats because we didn't have the heaters installed yet.  But now we do, and this year we're growing all kinds of annual bedding plants and several varieties of floral hanging baskets, all to sell at the market.  Right now we have 500 flats of pansies and about 1,000 potted perennials (hostas, astilbe, etc.) getting ready to kick off the season in early march.

Here's a couple pictures of the market in the spring:




In the fall it's mums:




This is our mum field, each pot is drip irrigated and we can measure out to each pot the amount of water, fertilizer, fungicide, etc. each plant gets:



In addition to the commercial operation, we also grow vegetables in a 50 X 150 foot garden, for our own use.  We generally get several hundred quarts of beets, wax beans, green beans, carrots, pickles, tomato products, sauerkraut, potatoes, spinach, peas, corn, melons, frozen peppers, brocolli and brussel sprouts and about a dozen different dried spices.  Not to mention fresh lettuces, radishes and onions when in season.  And Honey!  I've been trying to coax apples out of our two trees, and have been nursing the pear and peach saplings along for a couple years.  Hope springs eternal.  

Does anyone have any tips on pruning fruit trees?

-- Kris
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Beth Kirkley
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« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2005, 09:14:23 PM »

My whole trailer could fit easily inside the smaller greenhouse you have, and about 8 trailer of this size could fit in the other.  shocked

I want one!  cry

You are pretty much doing some of the things we want to do around here. (sigh) I'll keep working towards that day.

Beth
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Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2005, 10:49:55 PM »

That is really nice. I am shure you will get there some day Beth. we just produce enough for us to store and sell at small local farmers markets as back up produce to farmers running low. bye
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Ryan Horn
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« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2005, 04:12:08 PM »

kris

    check online @ rutgers cooperative extension.  you'll be able to print out some good stuff.   their master gardener office doesn't open 'til march 15.   i do know that fruit trees flower on horizontal branches so they are the ones you want to keep.   pruning should be done this month.  make sure you leave the growth collar at the baase of the branch. the tree will heal quicker.

mark
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Anonymous
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« Reply #11 on: February 06, 2005, 09:09:00 AM »

Yes there is some thing to do in the cold. Beside complain.    

It's That Time !
The cold temperatures are good for something. . . . PRUNING! I would encourage you to sharpen up the blades on your pruners and "go at it". Now is absolutely THE BEST TIME to prune many shrubs and trees. When pruning a plant, the cut area has time to "harden off" before spring comes (which also brings bugs looking for entry points into landscape plants). Winter is also a great time, due to the lack of leaves on most plants as well. Look for crossing branches, and trim one of them off. Also look for tight branch angles, generally wider branch angles are stronger. A few do's and don'ts:

1. Only prune spring blooming plants now if you are OK with fewer blooms left for spring.

2. Never prune a Pine Tree in the winter unless you are removing branches from the bottom of the tree. (spruce & fir can be pruned or shaped as long as you make your cut about 1/4 inch from a bud). Pines are best pruned or shaped after the new growth as hardened off in June/July.

3. Most Horticulturists do not recommend using sprays, paints or sealers on the cut areas.

4. When pruning to maintain the shape or density of shade or flowering trees, always prune back to a bud. Cut approximately 1/4" from the bud. Make sure that you pick a bud that is pointing in the direction that you want the tree to grow in.

5. Overgrown deciduous shrubs can often be rejuvenated by pruning all the branches back to about 12-24 inches and thinning out the number of "canes" or stems coming up from the ground. This technique works well with plants like Forsythia, Lilac, Spirea and others. Check with us if you are unsure if this method is best for the plant that needs trimming.

6. Pruning Fruit Trees (especially Apple) now will help your plants produce bigger fruit this summer.

Want more information?

Click below for information on pruning shrubs:
http://www.gardengatetips.com/etips/021204.html
Click below for more information on the "when" of pruning:
http://www.gardengatetips.com/etips/020220.html
Click below for information on the "tools of the trade":
http://www.gardengatetips.com/etips/020213.html

 Cheesy Al
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