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Author Topic: Would it be possible to rent pasture or farmland and then plant bee pasture?  (Read 592 times)

Offline Smertrios

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I dont know how farm rentals work but something I've wanted to do is succession plant a field with phacelia tanacetifolia and find out how profitable it can be. With bees, pollen, honey, wax, propolis and flower seeds how could this fail?

Offline Joe D

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How could this fail, its farming.  I don't know where you are, but around here you can rent fields.  I rent mine to a neighbor for so much a year.  I had an understanding with him before he got it, I have Crimson Clover and Hairy Fetch along with some other clovers and things planted, and I wanted him to let it get through the bloom stage and have some seeds before he cut it for hay.  That way it reseeds itself.  You would just have to see what you have to do where you are.  You may have to get the field prepared for the planting and fertilizer.   Check on the price of rent, seed, fertilizer, and other equipment you may need.   Another thing some beeks here do is talk to a local farmer and get farmer to let them to put hives on his land for a fee, money or honey.

Good Luck

Joe D

Offline divemaster1963

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I have a hunting club that plants 57 acares of clover for deer and turkeys. That found out that I had bees and asked if I would put bees out so that they could cut their costs of reseeding. We wrote up a contract that I would maintain the hives and that they would protect my hives by not shooting towards my hives . works out great becuase during cold weather and deer and turkey season they can place a group level blind in the same area as my hives and the game walks right up to them and they get clean quick kills. I have 35 hives there so far and roomfor150 more. I have another private preserve that is wanting hives to .

John

Offline Smertrios

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Okay another question about renting farmland. I am looking at 36 acres of tillable land in Florida and the owner wants $299 as rent per month which works out to be $99.67 per tillable acre per year. He is saying its pasture that can be used for growing crops *but* according the the USDA thats $39.64 more than non-irrigated cropland and is $88.6 higher per acre than pasture land.

The dollar amounts I am using are in the spreadsheet at the link below for the 2015 year. Double click on Florida in one of the columns and the spreadsheet reloads to only show Florida.
http://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/results/58B27A06-F574-315B-A854-9BF568F17652#7878272B-A9F3-3BC2-960D-5F03B7DF4826

The parcel I am talking about
http://www.farmlandsearch.com/8748082/43-4-Acres-Ponds-Well-for-Farming-or-Grazing

That area of Florida has 2 prisons, 1 correctional facility, nuclear power plant, drinking water stations and fines for businesses serving ground water! Anyone have any comments about the price and location? Just looking for input incase someone has any.

Offline Eric Bosworth

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$300/month seems high to me... I rent a house, garage and 88 acres with a 3/4 acre pond for $450/month.... Then again... My parents are my land lords...
Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote.
Benjamin Franklin

Offline sawdstmakr

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Why not find a farmer that grows hay and work out a deal that you pay for the seed of the plants that you want and he lets it grow to full bloom and he gets to harvest it. I would let him pay for the fertilizer and tilling/planting. Maybe just over seeding. Clover runs around $275.00 a 50# bag. Make sure that there is to be no grazing.
Jim
"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain

Offline Joe D

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At the present I get 600 dollars a year for 25 acres.   Will probably go up a little next year.  He puts out the fertilizer, cuts the hay, bales and hauls it off.  I had the clover, hairy fetch and etc planted for years.  If it get to go to seed, some mature, it will reseed itself for the next year.



Joe D

Offline Smertrios

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The property owner has not seen it in years and says there is only 28 acres of tillable land because of the water and trees. Found another website listing the same property with some more recent (and real) pics and its a mess of tall weeds! Good news is I could use it the way I want.

Offline Eric Bosworth

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Are the weeds all the same? Or is there the possibility of a more continuous bloom?
Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote.
Benjamin Franklin

Offline TwT

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Too much money and work to rent, till, seed, fertilizer  and then wait to seeif you get a honey crop, too risky, best thing to do is find a farmer and put your bees on his place, this time of year cotton should be going. Jmho
THAT's ME TO THE LEFT JUST 5 YEARS FROM NOW!!!!!!!!

Never be afraid to try something new.
Amateurs built the ark,
Professionals built the Titanic

Offline Smertrios

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Hope your not right TwT because I am going to try if I can get a good location and enough money.

Eric Bosworth - I wish I knew

Offline Smertrios

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Anyone have experience with FloridaFarmFinder.org? I registered an account several days ago but still waiting for confirmation.

Offline Smertrios

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Re: Would it be possible to rent pasture or farmland and then plant bee pasture?
« Reply #12 on: September 03, 2015, 08:28:34 PM »
Why not find a farmer that grows hay and work out a deal that you pay for the seed of the plants that you want and he lets it grow to full bloom and he gets to harvest it. I would let him pay for the fertilizer and tilling/planting. Maybe just over seeding. Clover runs around $275.00 a 50# bag. Make sure that there is to be no grazing.
Jim

That is something I will try if its possible where I end up getting land to plant but I want/need something that I can keep in continuous bloom. I like the idea of a consistent nectar and pollen source.

Offline OldMech

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Re: Would it be possible to rent pasture or farmland and then plant bee pasture?
« Reply #13 on: September 03, 2015, 10:25:43 PM »
I plant about 12 acres with Sainfoin, Borage, Crimson clover, Birdsfoot Trefoil, Hubam clover, and a bit of Buckwheat..   That mix works out well, there is always something in the field blooming and the bees take adantage of it..
   Having said that.. I make two hundred dollars an Acre cash leasing my land, and thats a bit less than the going rate from neighbors lands..  I cant afford to plant more for the bees at that price..
   I think it was Larry Conner that said 5 WELL planted acres could support 20 hives... I keep 20 to 30 hives in my home yard and wanted to make sure, so planted 12 acres..

   It requires money to do it..   Round up to burn down what ever is already there, then a good disking to break it all up. A spreader to broadcast the seed, or a Drill to drill the seed. If broadcasting it takes a clod buster or a disk to incorporate the seed, and of course, it takes a tractor and fuel to do all of that, not to mention the cost of the seed mix...
   With the mix I mentioned above, I cut it and bale it, and use it for cows and horses, so I can recoup some of the money spent. Otherwise it would not be worth it..
   If you try to cheap out and plant with something already standing, most of those cover crops will be crowded out within a couple of years. It will also require mowing more often due to the weeds that will crowd out and shade the desired bee forage.. Oh yeah, did I mention mowing it once or twice a year to keep the weeds down??   You also need to re disk and re plant at 5 or 6 years to keep the optimum forage growing.. at least here, if you dont the Fescue and other grasses will crowd out your preferred growth, even when you do mow it once in a while..

   I consider it very worthwhile, my honey crop HAS improved dramatically, and my critters seem to like the mix as hay, and it also sells well as hay. If you have no secondary purpose or income from it, then no, its not worth it, not even close.
39 Hives and growing.  Havent found the end of the comfort zone yet.

Offline Joe D

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The trees and shrubs in and around the water can also bee a good place to find nectar and pollen.  Check them out places in the spring, for what is there or around the area.



Joe D