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Author Topic: Bubbles (not the chimp)  (Read 1780 times)
sean
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« on: October 25, 2008, 02:35:52 PM »

Have bottled some honey but some of the bottles have some very fine bubbles(looks almost foamy) starting from the base of the neck to the top. We use bottles for our honey not jars. Is there anyway to eliminate these bubbles quickly(they usually go away after a time) I need to deliver some on monday and would want it bubble-less. the honey tastes ok so i know there is nothing wrong with it
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2008, 03:55:02 PM »

The warmer the honey is the more quickly air will rise out of it.  But too warm will harm the flavor and darken the honey.
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BjornBee
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« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2008, 04:20:20 PM »

Take pride is those bubbles!

Tell them the honey is so fresh, you just barely had time to bottle it up and get it to them. And bubbles are a sign of freshly pour honey.  grin
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sean
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« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2008, 07:28:20 AM »

I thought about heating it but wanted to hear some opinions first. As for telling them its so fresh, we are a funny lot here, a lot of people may see it and irrespective of what you tell them they'll proclaim it spoilt/contaminated/mixed and nothing will change that view.
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steve
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« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2008, 09:21:09 AM »

In the future let your extracted honey settle in a settling tank for at least 48 hours...all the bubbles and a lot of the minute particles will rise to the surface. You then draw off your bottling honey from the valve at the bottom of the tank. These settling tanks are easy to make from 5 gal. buckets.
         Steve
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sean
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« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2008, 06:19:26 PM »

I am using 2 five gallon buckets to bottle honey and its not enough. I sell on average anywhere between 15-30 gallons a week. Ususally a few hours between pouring into the tank and bottling is good enough but occasionally this happens

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asprince
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« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2008, 07:10:39 PM »

sean,

That does not look like air bubbles to me. How are you filtering? After my honey sits for a day after extraction and straining, a white froth settles on the top. I skim this off before bottling.

The stuff in your bottles looks like that stuff I skim off. If I did not skim it off, the last few jars would look like your pictures.

Steve
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rdy-b
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« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2008, 10:04:49 PM »

you gotta let it settle out more than a few hours if the honey is room temp-and is the bottles  that have the foam in it from the bottom of the bucket -when the foam is on top- after it settles out and you draw honey from the bottom of the bucket or tank or drum- the foam will stick to the sides of the container you are using -are you cleaning up the foam from the end of the run or is it building up -dont stir the honey once you have it in the bucket or it wont stratify-you need to get a jacketed bottling tank -to warm the honey and life will be easy-warm honey thins out and settles faster-no heat is good and provides a great product but you cant rush it -and short cuts will cost more time in the long run -post a pic of your bottling bucket and what they are being filled from and perhaps we can give better advice -but for know i think the foam will stay in the bottle
there is more going on than air bubbles  Wink cool RDY-B


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sean
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« Reply #8 on: October 27, 2008, 08:43:49 AM »

will post another picture shortly
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KONASDAD
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« Reply #9 on: October 27, 2008, 10:31:56 AM »

room temps should be warm enough In Jamaica. Let it settle. And wow, you have thats much business! great for you. Just let it settle a day or two, skim of wax and bubbles.
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sean
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« Reply #10 on: October 27, 2008, 02:54:05 PM »

i kinda thought it would be warm enough. I am usually able to bottle within a few hours of  straining through cheese cloth. I supply mainly hotels on the "north Coast" (main tourist area) and they use about 72 to 144 bottles per fortnight, and 3 others in Kingston (Jamaica's Capitol). ideally i need a 30 or 40 gallon drum to bottle from. Somebody gave me the idea of bottling from the extractor which i will try.
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pdmattox
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« Reply #11 on: October 27, 2008, 09:15:37 PM »

The honey I got from Sean is out of this world good. I can see why it goes so fast.  Why not a 55 gallon food grad4 drum with a gate on it. If you need heat they make those barrel bands. just a thought.
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sean
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« Reply #12 on: October 29, 2008, 08:16:33 AM »

Kudos to the girls, i have/had nothing to do with it except take it. I do have 2 60 gall drums, i had placed a "honey gate" in one but it was done at the wrong place and wasnt flowing as it should. But i will be trying he extractor, its a 20 frame so will hold quite a good amount.
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rdy-b
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« Reply #13 on: October 29, 2008, 10:09:53 PM »

How come it wouldnt flow is there a breather-to overcome vacum-(a vent)-if you dont mind galvinized you could make it from a new garbage can of meadium size -or even a sturdy plastic one -price is right Wink -RDY-B
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sean
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« Reply #14 on: October 29, 2008, 10:17:45 PM »

didnt think about the breather and the gate(actually a 11/2 lock off valve) was placed at the top of the drum between the 2 threaded outlets. Needless to say when the drum was full both holes were under honey. Will correct the mistakes with the other drum
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rdy-b
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« Reply #15 on: October 29, 2008, 11:02:43 PM »

 this is what i use for drums it fits the large Bung and i use the small Bung for a vent -and they dont drip
https://www.dadant.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=383 RDY-B
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