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Author Topic: How to move them down  (Read 913 times)
Rachel
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« on: October 23, 2008, 11:15:19 AM »

I went to feed my bees yesterday and they are low on stores and dwindling in numbers.  I have two deeps right now and even though there are lots of bees in the upper deep, most of the comb is empty and some of the frames aren't even pulled out.  I feel like there is too much empty space.....  What should I do?  Do I shake each fame into the lower deep?  I really, really want this hive to make it!!!!
Thanks
Rachel
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BjornBee
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« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2008, 11:34:49 AM »

Rachel,
Having them below with an empty box on top is not a good thing. Trapped heat will be one of the best things they have right now. Combine them into one box.

Call C.O. Nolt and sons out of Lancaster Pa. 717-397-0751 Ask if they deliver to any Bakeries or supermarkets over in your direction. What your looking for is a product made by Dawn foods. It is a 50 pound block of Bes-Fond fondant. (about $38.50) You could also check on the Dawn foods website or check your local telephone book for bakery supply places.

I have taken bees out of pumpkins with no honey stores. I take half the block, and place 25 pounds directly on the inner cover. (this is why you knock them down to one box and leave them at the inner cover hole) Then you place an empty box around that, and put the top on.

It is not the cheapest way of feeding, but it keeps the moisture down inside the hive which is a killer in cold weather, and what you will get with syrup feeding. I have kept good numbers of light hives alive all winter this way.

If you or anyone you know is attending the Pa. state bee association meeting in Nov. let me know. I can take along a block with me. You can get away with some syrup feeding till then, but do not suggest you use this method much longer after that.

Good luck!
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Robo
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« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2008, 12:00:40 PM »

I agree with Bjorn,  get them down to one deep and feed them a solid food.   Syrup will put too much moisture in the hive and if they are weak, they will most likely get dysentery with syrup.   Sounds like just pulling the bottom deep may be the easiest.   

If you can't get the Fondant, you can make yourself a sugar board -> http://robo.bushkillfarms.com/beekeeping/emergency-feeding/

I assume you only have a few hives and are willing to go a little bit beyond the norm to help them make it through.  If the population is large enough, just providing Fondant/sugar should be sufficient, assuming they are healthy and you cut their space down.   If the population starts to dwindle, you could also help them by providing some supplemental heating with a 7watt night light.

rob...
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charlotte
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« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2008, 12:06:10 PM »

A question from a newbie regarding this-

Could you combine them with another strong hive? Or is it too late in the year to try this?
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Robo
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« Reply #4 on: October 23, 2008, 12:11:21 PM »

A question from a newbie regarding this-

Could you combine them with another strong hive? Or is it too late in the year to try this?

Sure,  but you would still be down a hive.

If you had 2 weak hives a combining would make more sense as you would improve your odds of at least getting one through the winter.  But combining with a strong hive that would make it on it's own doesn't buy you much.
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"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


charlotte
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« Reply #5 on: October 23, 2008, 12:19:57 PM »

Thank you Rob for the reply..Lot's to learn in the beekeeping world! cool
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Rachel
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« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2008, 01:47:27 PM »

Thank you!  I will call about the block.  I might also try to make the meeting......It will be good for me!
R
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