Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 29, 2014, 02:22:31 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Top Bar Hive for Newbee?  (Read 4429 times)
winenutguy
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 58


Location: Bellingham Washington


« on: October 25, 2008, 03:13:33 PM »

Hello All;
I am continuing my readings at home and here on the forum and I wanted to throw out a question for feedback.  I am considering having both a conventional hive and a Top Bar Hive this spring when I start my adventure with beekeeping.  My thinking is it would be a great learning experience.  Am I pushing the envelope to much or to fast with this idea?  Any and all thoughts would be greatly appreciated.  Best wishes and many thanks.  Winenutguy.
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13583


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2008, 03:52:57 PM »

The biggest down side to doing both side by side is, if you build a top bar hive that won't take standard frames, then you don't have easily sharable resources between the two hives.  If you build a Tanzanian (straight sided) top bar hive that can take standard frames, then you can greatly reduce this downside.  I would recommend starting off that you try to have two hives for which the combs can be interchanged in case you need some open brood for the other hive etc.  But you can do that if you build the TBH to the right dimensions...
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
winenutguy
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 58


Location: Bellingham Washington


« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2008, 08:36:31 PM »

Thank you!  I will give my idea extended thought.  Top Bar Hives seem very fascinating though.  I actually got the idea from looking at your sight.  Thank you again for sharing your wealth of knowledge.  It has certainly helped my search for questions and helped me decide what kind of beekeeper I would like to aspire too.  Best wishes, Marcus
Logged
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2008, 08:57:21 PM »

Thank you!  I will give my idea extended thought.  Top Bar Hives seem very fascinating though.  I actually got the idea from looking at your sight.  Thank you again for sharing your wealth of knowledge.  It has certainly helped my search for questions and helped me decide what kind of beekeeper I would like to aspire too.  Best wishes, Marcus

Marcus,
go for 2 standard hives and save the TBH for the 2nd or 3rd year, you'll be glad you did.  Has to do with the learning curve and options.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
winenutguy
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 58


Location: Bellingham Washington


« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2008, 12:09:41 AM »

Thanks Brian.  I think your right.  Fun to look into though.  Best, Marc
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13583


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2008, 01:53:19 PM »

Or start two top bar hives...
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
KONASDAD
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2011


Location: Cherry Hill, N.J.


« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2008, 03:09:58 PM »

be consistent your first year or so. One, interchangeability of frames as MB mentioned. The second reason, if a hive does well, is it the TBH or standard frame? or your beekeeping practices? You will learn more about your beekeeping skills by keeping as much identical as possible. This means frames, foundation, type of bee, location, tops bottoms SBB etc. This way everything will be "equal" and you will get a better undersdanding of how your beekeeping skills impact your bees.
Logged

"The more complex the Mind, the Greater the need for the simplicity of Play".
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13583


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #7 on: October 27, 2008, 07:11:53 PM »

KONASDAD is right.  Two side by side hives often have dramatically different results from identical treatment and equipment.  You should probably observe this so you don't jump to erroneous conclusions...
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
winenutguy
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 58


Location: Bellingham Washington


« Reply #8 on: October 29, 2008, 08:39:32 PM »

Thank you both for your comments.  I'll keep on reading and decide a little further down the road.  Whatever I do I will stick to one type of hive.  Thank you again!  Winenutguy.
Logged
eivindm
Global Moderator
Field Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 647


Location: Oslo, Norway


WWW
« Reply #9 on: October 31, 2008, 07:24:58 AM »

I have just finished my first year as beekeeper, and I had a regular and a TBH.  This was a real challengde.  The regular was ok, and other beekeepers could give advice easily.  The other gave my a lot of headache (probably just being unlucky) giving me a failing queen in the worst possible time.

I should probably have gone for a tanzanian style hive, but I made a quite big version, where I could put regular Norwegian frames under the bars.  This saved this hive this year, as I could transfer eggs from the other hive. 

The Norwegian frames are a bit shorter than langstroth, I believe, but still the hive was getting quite big since the sides were sloped.  It really is a monster smiley

I have learned a lot from having both hives, but I would not recomend it to others.  It is probably a much better idea to wait until year two.
Logged
winenutguy
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 58


Location: Bellingham Washington


« Reply #10 on: October 31, 2008, 02:25:15 PM »

Thank you eividm!
The more I read about TBH's the more they interest me.  I am not looking to make tons of honey.  I'm not looking to be any sort of side-liner someday.  I just want to learn about bees, try an increase the general bee population, have more polinators on our property and do all of this in as natural a process as possible.  I will not use any sort of chemical or non-natural product with my bees.  The other thing that fascinates me is bees and comb.  I think natural comb is one of natures most beautiful works of art.  I want to see the bees do there thing like they have done for millions years and learn and enjoy that wonderful process.  This would all be possible with Lang. hives I know, its just that TBH looks more like what the bees do on their own when left to there own devices.  I want to support and if I can nurture, not make them do something unnatural. 
Anyway this is my general thinking at the moment.  Still a ways a way from spring.  Any others thoughts or suggestions would be very welcome. 
Best wishes, Winenutguy
Logged
mtbe
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 103

Location: Ottawa, Illinois


« Reply #11 on: November 05, 2008, 12:39:35 PM »

Winenut,

I am a beginner and I just finished building two top bar hives.  I chose these because they appear easier to work (lifting only one at a time - but more messy in the honey collecting), and I built them with windows so I can see them without disturbing them much.  I will be ordering my first bees in January when I start a class close to Chicago.

From what I've read, it is best to have the same type hives, whichever you chose.

I've also talked with several people who recommend starting with the traditional Langstom hive, as you will have many more people (resources) with whom to discuss issues and ideas.
Logged
allenrs
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 12


Location: hazel green al. in extreme north AL.

anglish spoken here.


« Reply #12 on: November 12, 2010, 09:00:59 AM »

I have not  even started keeping yet (start in spring off 2011) but from what I have read you can do lang hives and foundationless frames.You would have the same joy and challenges as but types of hives.
Logged

Everybody on this earth has got a place,cept them folks that ain't got no place,and they just tend to wander around on other folkes place.
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13583


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #13 on: November 12, 2010, 07:55:01 PM »

If you really want to compare Langstroth and Top bar hives you can build a TTBH (Tanszanian) built to take Langstroth frames but use top bars in it, and have a Langstroth next to it that takes the same size.  that way you can share resources, but don't assume because one does better that it's all about the hive... two colonies never do exactly the same...
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Burnsy
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 22

Location: Western Australia


« Reply #14 on: November 13, 2010, 07:17:15 AM »

I started with a topbar hive a few months back and love it, make sure you include an observation window if you do go top bar as it is a great way to sit and watch the hive.  My next one will have a perspex follower board as well so I can watch even more goings on.  I have now started dabbling in langs and am setting up a 8 frame foundationless hive at the moment.  My topbars are pretty big (20 inch) as being in Aust where it is pretty warm I wanted additional surface for the comb to be attached to and I also wanted to be able to experiment further down the track with placing a super that takes standard frames on top of the hive.
Logged
latebee
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 314


Location: western new york, near buffalo and niagara falls 42 50' N latitude and 78 50' W longitude


« Reply #15 on: November 19, 2010, 09:20:18 PM »

  This is more of a question than an answer or reply. i would like to know how well your topbar
hives winter in comparison to Lanngstroth's at latitudes above the 43rd degree in North America?
Logged

The person who walks in another's tracks leaves NO footprints.
BjornBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3773


Location: Lewisberry, PA


« Reply #16 on: November 20, 2010, 07:31:28 AM »

I don't see some big learning curve or vast advantage of NOT starting with a TBH right from the start.

Here are some pro/con issues with TBHs and some points of consideration.

http://www.bjornapiaries.com/topbarbeekeeping.html


« Last Edit: November 20, 2010, 08:01:05 AM by BjornBee » Logged

www.bjornapiaries.com
www.pennapic.org
Please Support "National Honey Bee Day"
Northern States Queen Breeders Assoc.  www.nsqba.com
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13583


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #17 on: November 20, 2010, 07:54:44 AM »

My temperatures are similar to Vermont.  -27 F for a couple of weeks last winter.  My top bar hives did fine as they have for the last six or seven years that I've had them here.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
latebee
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 314


Location: western new york, near buffalo and niagara falls 42 50' N latitude and 78 50' W longitude


« Reply #18 on: November 20, 2010, 12:11:59 PM »

  Thank's Michael, I was wondering how the topbar hives did in areas with very cold winters.
Logged

The person who walks in another's tracks leaves NO footprints.
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.166 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page July 28, 2014, 12:41:44 PM