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Author Topic: Unwanted Colony treatment options  (Read 2029 times)

Offline JWChesnut

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Unwanted Colony treatment options
« on: October 25, 2008, 06:30:16 PM »
I recently hived a swarm, but I have become convinced these bee are likely AHB.  I do not want to preserve the colony: requeening expense is not justified this time of year (even if postal queens were available).

 Nor do I want to try and kill the queen and combine with one of my other hives, as I believe this may encourage fall robbing/chaos of the hive I would combine with. (Hives are in deep + shallow configuration) for the fall/winter.

How do I reclaim my super?  I have seen some reference to CO2 fumigation-- are details and techniques available.  Are there other options for culling the colony that would not leave a toxic residue on my super and drawn frames.

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Unwanted Colony treatment options
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2008, 07:33:16 PM »
Soap suds is the most effective way that leaves no harmful residue.
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen

Offline bmacior

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Re: Unwanted Colony treatment options
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2008, 07:34:11 PM »
If nothing else, seal up the hive and let them suffocate.  

Offline BjornBee

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Re: Unwanted Colony treatment options
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2008, 07:55:16 PM »
A walk-in freezer would be nice   :-D
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Offline JP

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Re: Unwanted Colony treatment options
« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2008, 10:09:37 PM »
Vacuum them or freeze them.


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Offline sean

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Re: Unwanted Colony treatment options
« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2008, 08:32:55 AM »
Why not kill the queen  take a frame of eggs & brood from one of your colonies and let them raise a new queen, assuming you are in a location where that is possible at this time of year

Offline steve

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Re: Unwanted Colony treatment options
« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2008, 10:12:16 AM »
Take your hive of bees several 100 feet from it's original location, set an empty hive box in the old location and then shake and or brush the bees off of the frames you want to save. The bees will go back to their old location in the empty hive body (no frames).Early the next morning before they start flying spray them with soapy water as brother Bush has suggested. A little less mess to clean on the drawn comb.....maybe a little more traumatic for you and the bees though..... hmmmmmmm
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Offline Hivehead

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Re: Unwanted Colony treatment options
« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2008, 02:49:47 PM »
If your AFB's are like mine were...emphasis on were...shaking them out is not going to be very much fun at all and 100 feet or yards away is not going to be far enough for innocent passersby.  more like 200 yards.  If they aren't causing a problem now and they're about to slow down for the winter, I'd let them be and requeen in the spring.  Their attitude changes practically overnight with a kinder gentler queen.  I can now open my previously vicious hive without smoke and they act as if nothing is going on, just continue on with their beezness.   If they're a problem, consider one of the previously mentioned extermination techniques.  Just what I would do.

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Unwanted Colony treatment options
« Reply #8 on: October 26, 2008, 05:54:22 PM »
Personally, I'd requeen them, but soap suds are how I'd kill them if that was my intent.
Michael Bush
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Offline JWChesnut

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Re: Unwanted Colony treatment options-- question re the "soapy water" tip.
« Reply #9 on: October 26, 2008, 07:33:23 PM »
Does soapy water mean Dish Detergent or genuine soap (ie Ivory). Is liquid laundry detergent acceptable?  How strong a mix?

Sorry for seeming so particular, but these are some ugly AHB, and I want to get it absolutely correct the first time.

I like hiving swarms, but the fact the bees seemed smaller than normal should of tipped me off that this was not a good idea in this case.

  This would be a swarm just outside the reported range-- so I want to be absolutely responsible.

Offline JP

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Re: Unwanted Colony treatment options-- question re the "soapy water" tip.
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2008, 08:05:34 PM »
Does soapy water mean Dish Detergent or genuine soap (ie Ivory). Is liquid laundry detergent acceptable?  How strong a mix?

Sorry for seeming so particular, but these are some ugly AHB, and I want to get it absolutely correct the first time.

I like hiving swarms, but the fact the bees seemed smaller than normal should of tipped me off that this was not a good idea in this case.

  This would be a swarm just outside the reported range-- so I want to be absolutely responsible.

Liquid dishwashing soap like Ivory or palmolive. Just because they are small is not a guage they are AHB.


...JP
"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus
and
http://picasaweb.google.com/112138792165178452970

My Youtube videos can be viewed here:

My website JPthebeeman.com http://www.jpthebeeman.com/jpthebeeman/

Offline bmacior

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Re: Unwanted Colony treatment options
« Reply #11 on: October 26, 2008, 11:01:08 PM »
If they are AHB and just outside the reported range, I'm sure some official would want some bees to autopsy to make positive identification.

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Unwanted Colony treatment options
« Reply #12 on: October 27, 2008, 07:33:54 AM »
You need soap that bubbles.  Laundry soap does not.  Dishwashing soap does.  But any soap that bubbles will work.  It's the bubbles you're really looking for.  The bubbles form across the spiracles that the bees breath through and they suffocate.

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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Offline Scadsobees

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Re: Unwanted Colony treatment options
« Reply #13 on: October 27, 2008, 01:40:46 PM »
Where are you?  If it is cold in the winter, I'd wait and shake them out in the snow.

Otherwise, if you want to keep the honey, you could seal up the hive very well and put a block of dry ice on the top of the frames in an empty super, the CO2 will suffocate them and there will not be ANY residue and the honey possibly can be recovered and consumed.

Rick
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Offline JWChesnut

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Re: Unwanted Colony treatment options
« Reply #14 on: October 27, 2008, 02:33:57 PM »
ScadsofBees asks: Where are you?  If it is cold in the winter, I'd wait and shake them out in the snow.

Coastal Central California-- I hived the swarm 2 weeks ago.

Offline pdmattox

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Re: Unwanted Colony treatment options
« Reply #15 on: October 27, 2008, 11:07:40 PM »
just updated your profile to help others with your location. :)