Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
April 16, 2014, 01:18:44 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: slatted racks  (Read 2066 times)
bmacior
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 169


Location: Payson Utah


« on: September 14, 2008, 09:11:35 AM »

Who uses slatted racks and why? huh
Logged
bmacior
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 169


Location: Payson Utah


« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2008, 09:24:42 AM »

Guess I should've read a little further down the posts. grin  Still would appreciate some input.
Logged
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2008, 09:29:52 PM »

Who uses slatted racks and why? huh

Here are a few of the reasons I use slatted racks:
1. Play for bees to hang out and not beard the front of the hive which restricts access by foragers.
2. It provides a thermal layer of air between the bottom of the hive and the brood chamber which aids in overwintering.
3. The bars of the rack act similar to a mouse guard.
4. The bees can use the rack as a work platform when circulating air throughout the hive when cooling, warming, or evaporating moisture.
5. I provides more space between bottom board and brood chamber, thus varroa mites have a harder time reattaching to other bees when they fall off.

There are a few more reasons, but my brain is tired so I can't think of them right now.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Moonshae
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 988


Location: Helmetta,NJ


« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2008, 04:05:55 PM »

I've noticed a huge reduction in bearding when I installed the racks. From the whole front of the hive covered with bees in the afternoon/evening to none. The other reasons Brian mentioned are good reasons, too, but I have not been able to visually observe such things.
Logged

"The mouth of a perfectly contented man is filled with beer." - Egyptian Proverb, 2200 BC
poka-bee
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1651


Location: buckley wa

I am NEVER bored!!


WWW
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2008, 07:02:36 PM »

I have them cause they just made sense?  huh  I'm new so what do I know. My hives are both doing very well, even with my starving em & killing off a wheelbarrow full this spring..  rolleyes  I read what people said & decided to try them so I don't know what it would be like not to have them.  Jody
Logged

I'm covered in Beeesssss!  Eddie Izzard
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13466


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2008, 08:44:53 PM »

Try a search.  There are many discussions on this.  I have used them, but don't have any cut down to eight frames, so I'm not using any right now.  I like them, but not enough to buy 200 of them in order to have one for every hive.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Pond Creek Farm
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 566


Location: Republic, MO


« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2008, 08:54:31 PM »

I have read in the past of Mr. Bush and others recommendations and preference for top entrances.  Does the slotted rack in such a set up go on top or on the bottom?  Does it have the same benefits for a top entrance hive?  I have them on my bottom entrance hives, but quite frankly I have them because I was told they are good to have.  I have four hives, so I do not have the same expense load of a larger scale beekeeper.
Logged

Brian
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2008, 11:43:02 PM »

I have read in the past of Mr. Bush and others recommendations and preference for top entrances.  Does the slotted rack in such a set up go on top or on the bottom?  Does it have the same benefits for a top entrance hive?  I have them on my bottom entrance hives, but quite frankly I have them because I was told they are good to have.  I have four hives, so I do not have the same expense load of a larger scale beekeeper.

I would recomment both.  A slatted rack can also sub for a queen excluder in that is discourages the queen from going up but the workers will go right through it as the spaces are bee spaces.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13466


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #8 on: September 20, 2008, 09:02:30 PM »

>I have read in the past of Mr. Bush and others recommendations and preference for top entrances.  Does the slotted rack in such a set up go on top or on the bottom?

When I've used them on a top entrance hive, I just use #8 hardware cloth and cover the bottom of the rack and use it for the bottom board.  The slats break up the draft so I don't need to put a tray in unless I want to monitor mites.

>  Does it have the same benefits for a top entrance hive?

Probably.  The brood still tends to be in the bottom and the bees still like to cluster under the brood nest.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
contactme_11
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 344

Location: Springfield, MA


« Reply #9 on: October 06, 2008, 10:41:25 PM »


I would recomment both.  A slatted rack can also sub for a queen excluder in that is discourages the queen from going up but the workers will go right through it as the spaces are bee spaces.
Wouldn't this encourage buildup in the open space (usually around 2") between the brood boxes and the bottom of the slatted rack?
Logged
rast
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 553

Location: Mascotte, Fl.


« Reply #10 on: October 08, 2008, 10:55:56 AM »

 If you are speaking of using it on top, flip it upside down and it will maintain the 3/8 space.
Logged

Fools argue; wise men discuss.
    --Paramahansa Yogananda
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.258 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page March 25, 2014, 11:22:32 AM