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Author Topic: SHB refuge in PF frames  (Read 2547 times)
ArmucheeBee
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« on: October 02, 2008, 08:41:13 PM »

Is anyone else having trouble with SHB taking refuge in MannLake PF plastic frames?   The openings across the top bar allow for the beetles to get in, but are too small for the bees to get to them.  I am thinking about taking Gulf Wax and sealing these up a little.  The bees can get their heads in but not to the back of the void.  No "off-comments" about not using plastic please--that thread has been beaten like a loose shutter in a hurricane!  I wonder also, if MannLake has gotten comments on this?
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Stephen Stewart
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Ross
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« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2008, 09:28:50 PM »

It has been discussed on a couple of boards.  I would seal them with epoxy I think.  You can have similar problems with grooved bottoms and metal frame rests.  Anywhere the bees can't patrol is bad news.
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« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2008, 05:10:00 AM »

I have heard of beekeepers using hot glue gun to seal spaces,
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ArmucheeBee
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« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2008, 09:51:36 AM »

Would glue be toxic to the bees?  I was going to use Gulf Wax due to the low toxicity?
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Stephen Stewart
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« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2008, 10:04:40 AM »

I tried beeswax, but that sure takes a lot and it adds much weight.  I try to keep the frames pressed togather in the hive, and that seals the grooves,  and the bees do propolise them as well.

I don't bother much about them anymore.  But up here in the frozen north, SHB are around but not a huge concern.

Rick
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ArmucheeBee
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« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2008, 11:19:20 AM »

Mine are pushed together but the double bee space at the top is the problem.  The voids on the sides are big enough for bees but they are closed off when the frames are together.  Looks like they should make the sides small and the tops wide.  Bees wax is too expensive to fill the voids.
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Stephen Stewart
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2008, 09:17:34 PM »

I don't have SHB so I don't know about that.  But the people who do seem to think that place like that are used by the bees to coral the SHB.
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Michael Bush
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ArmucheeBee
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« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2008, 10:15:39 PM »

They are coralled, but after reading up on SHB, they can lay eggs in there, eggs hatch and crawl right to the comb.  If the SHB do not have a place to hide, looks like they would attacked and hopefully killed.  It would also push them toward entering traps more readily.  I'll try the glue and see if the bees chew it, and the wax too.
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Stephen Stewart
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« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2008, 11:41:04 PM »

They are coralled, but after reading up on SHB, they can lay eggs in there, eggs hatch and crawl right to the comb.  If the SHB do not have a place to hide, looks like they would attacked and hopefully killed.  It would also push them toward entering traps more readily.  I'll try the glue and see if the bees chew it, and the wax too.

well seem you answered your own question, go with wood frames, no place to hide with wood frames, maybe thats why I like wood also  evil  rolleyes grin , wood frames and wax foundation is the best i have ever used.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2008, 08:13:59 AM »

It seems to me that SHB and Wax moths lay eggs in hives all the time.  In a strong hive the bees usually kill the larvae, however, as soon as they emerge.  But I will defer to those with more experience with SHB on this matter.
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Michael Bush
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ArmucheeBee
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« Reply #10 on: October 11, 2008, 02:19:42 PM »

I know people losing hives to SHB and they have wood frames so.....  I'm not going to wood frames, no reason to.  I just had a swarm to build out two PF 120 frames in 10 days in October!  They seem to like plastic, but I did not want this thread to turn to this and look what happened!  I'll put some gulf wax in the voids and maybe leave a couple of voids open to kill SHB in!!   My own SHB trap!   Unless anyone knows of problems with Gulf Wax.
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Stephen Stewart
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #11 on: October 11, 2008, 02:43:18 PM »

>Unless anyone knows of problems with Gulf Wax.

The only problem is that the bees will move it around and it will get into your wax, making it not pure beeswax which makes it not worth much money as wax.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #12 on: October 19, 2008, 06:59:13 PM »

I don't have SHB so I don't know about that.  But the people who do seem to think that place like that are used by the bees to coral the SHB.


Do you attribute the lack of infestation to geography or a method of beekeeping you employ?  If the latter, which aspect(s) of your approach do you credit?  I am noticing SHB in all of my hives but I am significantly south of you in southern Missouri.
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« Reply #13 on: October 19, 2008, 07:45:16 PM »

I realize my bees are smaller, but mine can get into the grooves in the PF 120s.

>Do you attribute the lack of infestation to geography or a method of beekeeping you employ?

Probably geography.  It was not until this last year that any SHB were confirmed in Nebraska.  But I think I might have one or two now, which I did not before.  But they have not been a problem.  It may be the clay soil, the harsh winters, the dry summers.  I don't know.

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Michael Bush
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ArmucheeBee
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« Reply #14 on: October 19, 2008, 08:09:59 PM »

my bees are small also, since all are from cutout sources and had small comb (i measured).  they can not get their thorax past the start of the void.  now this is only along the top and bottom where the voids are that small, the sides are wide enough for them, but the side voids cover each other when the placed against each other in the box.

i melted some gulf wax into about 8 frames.  just poured it from a cup.  i'll find a better way latter.  i only killed 7 SHB in 3 hives this weekend.  so they are calming down now.  i'll be ready in Sep. and Oct of next year.
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Stephen Stewart
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