Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
December 19, 2014, 12:58:42 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: My head hurts  (Read 9724 times)
NCSteve
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 29

Location: Hillsborough, NC


« on: January 19, 2005, 03:44:43 PM »

Ok Ive read read and read posts from a bunch of message boards for over a month now, watched videos, read a few books on beekeeping and Im about to explode.

 Is there anything, I mean anything that beekeepers agree on?

 All the info is rollin around in my poor lil head and the power drill didnt help....this time.  rolleyes


 This message was brought on trying to correlate info on how to do splits.
 Geebus.
Logged
buzz
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 148


Location: Hayden Lake, ID


WWW
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2005, 04:18:29 PM »

I know what your saying. I think for most of it, there isn't just one right way to do it. You just have to pick one that sounds good and give it a try.
Logged

Scott
----------
"If you have no money and you have few possessions, if you have a dog you are still rich"
----------
"Forgiveness is easier to get than permission"
Jay
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 471


Location: Concord, MA


« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2005, 05:18:48 PM »

I think the one thing we can all agree on is, no matter how you do it, it's fun!! cheesy

Are you planning to do a split in the spring Steve?
Logged

By the rude bridge that arched the flood
Their flag to Aprils breeze unfurled
Here once the embattled farmers stood
And fired the shot heard round the world
-Emerson
NCSteve
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 29

Location: Hillsborough, NC


« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2005, 05:50:04 PM »

No, this is my first year, so no splits. Im just taking notes on all the different chores I may have to do and getting realted information. Splitting isnt a chore Ill likely have to worry about but I have a bad habit of learning all I can on any new hobby I take up. Especially if its getting into my wallet. huh

 But lets get into a question I do have. Optimal brood setup.

 Now, Im leaning towards a 2 deep for brood. Why? Because it was on the first video I saw and was parroted in Beekeeping for dummies. But upon comparison it seems the video (Ed Weiss) is a direct takeoff of everything in the book. So I start looking to see if theres other methods. Oh boy.

 So let me just ask a direct question on that first. What configuration do you people run for brood? And why?

 Edit: Im buiding hives this winter ( I may have up to Cool, along with remodeling the house and making my poor computer room into a nursery. So every little thing may get blown out of proportion at any time.  Cheesy
Logged
Beth Kirkley
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 103

Location: Eastman, Georgia


WWW
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2005, 06:05:33 PM »

I have an idea Steve..... why not do a poll here in the forum, and that way you can see the percentages of who's doing what?

But for myself, I have my hives facing the same way as a DE hive, and when I turned it that way I also moved all the brood towards the front of the hive. I also use 2 brood boxes for each hive. But I do have a very unusual hive - one of them. (One hive is 2 brood boxes stacked - normal, and the other is an extra long "double" brood box - my experiment.) Both hives had more than usual brood, but the "double" brood box had too much ventilation. So I had to fix that.

Beth
Logged

NCSteve
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 29

Location: Hillsborough, NC


« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2005, 06:14:44 PM »

I saw your experimental hive. That one looks good. But I wasnt going that way yet. Smiley

 What I did do was start making screened bottom boards. Some of which are turned 90 degrees. Im looking at more info on how it works. I thought the reasoning behind it sounded good so I made some.
Logged
asleitch
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 203


Location: UK


« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2005, 03:36:55 AM »

Quote from: NCSteve
Is there anything, I mean anything that beekeepers agree on?


Most beekeepers agree its fun.

Most beekeepers agree if you ask 5 beekeepers for an opinion you'll get (a minimum) of 6 back.

Most beekeepers agree that its interesting and you never stop learning

Most beekeepers agree you are never too old to start

And most importantly!!!!!!!!!!

Most beekeepers agree to disagree on most beekeeping topics!

 wink  rolleyes

aDAM
Logged
Finman
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 440


Location: Hopelessly Lost


« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2005, 05:05:40 AM »

Quote from: asleitch

Most beekeepers agree to disagree on most beekeeping topics!

 wink  rolleyes

aDAM


asleitch is 120% right! I have never met so stubborn peoples like beekeepers.  To them it is not enough that they are right. They must convince that others are wrong.

You can nurse your bees in 20 diffrerent ways, but you got same yield. - Why. Because your methods have nothing to with  collecting honey and with the measure of nectar in flowers.


I am a little bit tired to argue with  novice level about freemated queens and small combs and "simsalabim" on the way 50 years backwards.   That is not my idea to be here. That is why I am going to stay away here a while.


Keep on beekeeping boys and girls!

Logged
NCSteve
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 29

Location: Hillsborough, NC


« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2005, 06:43:05 AM »

Dont go far Finman. Your head butting no nonsense approach is needed here.
 Dissenting opinions are always needed on a board. Without it it turns into a fan club.
 
 This is what I think Im getting from your posts:

 1) Get your brood levels up as fast as possible before the nectar flow.
 2) Have your bees harvesting the best nectar producing plants you can put them on.
 3) Make sure they live through the winter.

 Simplified I know, but thats how I need to keep it. Heres what Im planning.

 I know Im starting with 4 packages. Maybe as much as 8 if things pan out.

 SSBs on all hives. Not so much because I think it kills mites, but for ventilation and an easy way to check on mites. I do have them made to run both the standard way and the long way, so Ill give that a shot straight off.

 Im running deeps for brood. I have an abundance of 1x12 so thats that.

 The 4 ordered packages arrive Apr 2. Now from what I can see the main flow starts around April 10 and on so I need to get them up and running quickly. Im not trying to get a crop this year, just the most out of the bees. So feeding on syrup with hive top feeders, and maybe something else.
 I dont know if pollen or pollen substitute would be effective because theres already some blooming going on. On the other hand they wont have to fly to get it. I need them making comb and laying, not flying at this time. So Im undecided.
 Adding Honey B Healthy is an option but I hear it works and it doesnt make a difference, so dunno. I probably will because I can if that makes sense.

 Add the second deep when they draw around 70% of the first. Ive read that some people just put the 2 boxes on straight off but that didnt make sense to me. I want my fledgling forces concentrating on one area at a time.

 Now heres a question if you can find it in this mess. Do I feed throughout the combbuilding process until they have the second deep drawn? Or will they tell me when its time to stop by not feeding on the syrup?

 Ill stop here. I have a feeling it could get to be too long of a post.
Logged
indypartridge
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1101


Location: Brown County, IN


« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2005, 06:44:56 AM »

If it's any consolation, you're not alone.  I'm in the exact same situation and feel the same way. I'll be starting my first hive this spring and have been reading books, watching videos and monitoring various bee boards all winter.  Obviously there's many ways of doing things, and what works for one may not work for another.
Logged
Lesli
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 420


Location: Upstate NY


« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2005, 06:53:54 AM »

Quote from: NCSteve
Dont go far Finman. Your head butting no nonsense approach is needed here.
 Dissenting opinions are always needed on a board. Without it it turns into a fan club.


Exactly. I don't want to argue, either, though.  The fact is that I don't know which approach is best. That's why I'm trying something different.

I'm reading the 1862 edition of Langstroth's The Hive and Honey Bee, and on the very first page of the very first chapter, he says, "Practical beekeeping in this country is in a very depressed condition...the ravages of the bee-moth have increased, the success is becoming more and more precarious.. While multitudes have abandoned the pursuit in disgust..."

So beekeeping has been here before, just about 150 years ago.  Then it was the wax moth, which today is pretty much a non-problem in strong colonies.
Logged

**************************
Lesli
http://beeyard.blogspot.com/
Finman
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 440


Location: Hopelessly Lost


« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2005, 07:21:50 AM »

Quote from: NCSteve
I know Im starting with 4 packages. Maybe as much as 8 if things pan out.

easy way to check on mites. .


You see the mite level when you open drone combs. Make them 1/3 spaces in foundation that they can draw drone comps. You can take them of and you will catch about 50% from mites.

 The 4 ordered packages arrive Apr 2. Now from what I can see the main flow starts around April 10 and on so I need to get them up and running quickly.
[/quote]

Because bees get food from field, it is not necessary to feed them. If you have 1-2 weeks bad weather that they cannot go out, feeding accelarate larva nursing.

But at spring the temperature of hive is most important. Are your nucs 5 frames or what? - You can give them terrarium hearter 15 W and nuc will develope 3 times faster than naturally.  (cold nights)

You can get normally honey during this summer.  If you have 5 frames nuc, it takes  2 month that hive is able to catch honey.  Dont give up  that vision.

When you enlarge hives, put new deep under the brood box.  If you have warmer, bees like to go to the lower box to make larvas. When hive has 1,5 boxes brood, it has good possibility to keep hive warm.

DONT FEED SYRUP it they get food from field. It only takes space from eggs and accelerate swarming.


In my case, we have none flowers in April when I start to give pollen and pollen substitute. Willow starts  1. of May. In my cottage area farmers have destroyed most of willows. I have just lack of food. I have too many hives in one place at spring.

Quote
Add the second deep when they draw around 70% of the first. Ive read that some people just put the 2 boxes on straight off but that didnt make sense to me. I want my fledgling forces concentrating on one area at a time. .


Add the second box when all frame gaps are full of bees. Put it down.

How much you get honey this summer? - It depends how much you have flowers at the distance of one mile and how much you have competitors or other bees to share your "honey mine".
Logged
NCSteve
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 29

Location: Hillsborough, NC


« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2005, 07:32:35 AM »

Heres what Ive gotten from the small cell discussion. I wont call it an arguement because no one called anyone a poopiehead or anything Shocked

 The Lusbys have been successful so far with regressing their bees to be smaller along with a couple other things. The reasoning behind the success seems to make sense. So people want to try it. Sounds good.

 On the other hand, it was tried before and found lacking and is in fact a ressurected approach. Smaller bees I mean.  If in fact just smaller bees was the answer to varroa, and feral bees are naturally smaller, wouldnt it stand to reason that they wouldnt have been decimated like they have been?

 Now, some people say that the Lusbys dont get the credit they deserve because the chem companies dont want us to change to a more natural approach. But lets face it. Most of our respective states and countries dont house the chem companies and really dont care about them.

 For instance, NC beekeepers account for about 10 million dollars annually
just in bee products. Not including the crop growth that active pollination accounts for which could go as high as 20% on some crops.
 If they can find an easy way to keep the bees up and running, I believe theyd use it. After all, more bees = more money. More money= more taxes to them.

 So Im on the fence. People have had success going the small cell way, but until its tested and accepted by the majority I dont see things being changed. But the more that try it to see if it can work worldwide help the process along.

 Edit: Saw Finmans post. Ill have questions after work.  wink
Logged
Finman
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 440


Location: Hopelessly Lost


« Reply #13 on: January 20, 2005, 08:07:32 AM »

Quote from: NCSteve
Smaller bees I mean.  If in fact just smaller bees was the answer to varroa, and feral bees are naturally smaller


As far I have had bees, big ones are the best honey collectors. I have no mite problem, however I have had mites in my hives 17 years. This not religion. I just handle them.

 Is a big human better worker than the tiny one: "While the big one turns at the same time the tiny acts"  ....hehe hehh
Logged
golfpsycho
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 244

Location: salt lake city


« Reply #14 on: January 20, 2005, 08:54:42 AM »

I believe the small cell idea was spawned when people began noticing the mites prefered drone cells.  Drone comb can be used as a "trap" to remove mites, but I don't think they can be removed or maintained at levels low enough to prevent the colony from infection with the virii they carry.  In addition, raising drones beyond the level the bees naturally want is expensive.  That's alot of brother in laws lined up at the dinner table, and they don't help with the rent or mowing the lawn...not to mention all the energy it takes the bees to raise them.
I'm fooling around with some small cell, and I keep reading some different bulliten boards to see how they are managing the mites, but when it comes down to it, I have oxalic at the ready to knock them down.  I don't plan on losing my bees
No finman for a while?  What fun is that??  Guess he's got that proto thing going on for the superman gig.   hehehehehe
Logged
Jay
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 471


Location: Concord, MA


« Reply #15 on: January 20, 2005, 02:49:59 PM »

Quote from: Finman
You can give them terrarium hearter 15 W and nuc will develope 3 times faster than naturally.  (cold nights)


Finman, I have heard you mention the terrarium heaters now several times, but am not sure which one, what kind or where to put them in the hive exactly. I like the idea of "develop 3 times faster than natrually."

Maybe you could post a picture of one of your heaters and a description of where in the hive you place them so I could get a better understanding of what you mean. Please!?! Cheesy
Logged

By the rude bridge that arched the flood
Their flag to Aprils breeze unfurled
Here once the embattled farmers stood
And fired the shot heard round the world
-Emerson
Finman
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 440


Location: Hopelessly Lost


« Reply #16 on: January 20, 2005, 03:05:37 PM »

Quote from: Jay

Maybe you could post a picture of one of your heaters and a description of where in the hive you place them so I could get a better understanding of what you mean. Please!?! Cheesy


http://www.reptilica.de/shop/product_info.php/cPath/22_25_38/products_id/35/lang/english/index.htm

Here is picture. It is 3,5 m long cable and just put on the floor of hive.  The temperature is at surface about 40C.

I have those in my every hive at spring.  Marvellous development together with pollen feeding.

If you want give extra warm during winter, it must be only 6W to small hive (2 -3 frames) . Normal hive does not need warming.
Logged
Jay
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 471


Location: Concord, MA


« Reply #17 on: January 20, 2005, 03:39:39 PM »

Thanks Finman!  Do you put the whole cable on the floor of the hive or just a part of it?  If it's the whole 3.5 meters, do you just coil it back and forth on the bottom? Thanks again for the info! Cheesy
Logged

By the rude bridge that arched the flood
Their flag to Aprils breeze unfurled
Here once the embattled farmers stood
And fired the shot heard round the world
-Emerson
Finman
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 440


Location: Hopelessly Lost


« Reply #18 on: January 20, 2005, 04:36:05 PM »

Quote from: Jay
 Do you put the whole cable on the floor of the hive or just a part of it? D


Just round the floor. 50 cm of it is cold.  Cabel is waterproof.

Queen lays eggs in  frames from corner to corner.
Logged
NCSteve
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 29

Location: Hillsborough, NC


« Reply #19 on: January 21, 2005, 09:09:51 AM »

I went to my first beeclub meeting and Ill have to say I feel much better.
The reading Ive been doing let me contribute right away, I just had to make sure I prefaced what I said with, "I dont  KNOW anything but..." Smiley

 Back to pondering.

 So on a new hive the temp is important. Using a SBB, the temp plays a more important role. So Im thinking Ill just slide in the sheet if the nights are cool, so the hive can maintain the proper temperature easier. Yes?

 On the feeding. So youre saying I dont need to feed if I have a flow, even on a new hive?
 Is feeding in the spring only done before the flow to get the bees producing earlier so their numbers are up for the season?
 Then again in the fall after the flow to get ready for winter?

 Adding the second brood box. Ok thats the first time I heard to put it under the first. I dont see the need for a warmer in April so will the bees still go down? Im confused, because the talks that go on about brood box reversals state that bees dont like to go down. Im gonna need help on that part methinks.

 Onto Drone brood. Ok I get that varroa like the drone larva. Should I run a frame with drone foundation in the hives?
 If I do which frame number is best?
 I understand that as soon as its capped, remove it and freeze it.
 Do I then check all the capped larva or just some to get an idea of mite count?
 Do I have to clean it out or will the bees do it if I put it back?
 While Im freezing/checking the capped comb, do I replace the frame with another empty drone comb?
Logged
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.435 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page November 30, 2014, 09:53:53 PM