Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 22, 2014, 08:15:00 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat(2)  

Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Brian, this one is for you, the beginning of the hatch  (Read 7651 times)
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #20 on: October 13, 2008, 09:34:44 PM »

Quote
The AustralorpeX have interesting markings, some have black legs and some have yellow, what does that mean?  Anything?  Tell me, please!!!

Pure bred Australorps have black legs, any other color (or combination) indicates a cross breeding.   But since I have no Australorp roosters all of yours are cross breeds showing the different variations of coloration.

Keep us posted in this post on the chicks.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #21 on: October 28, 2008, 11:53:01 AM »

Brian, today is the one month birthday of the chicks.  I will go and get some cool pics today.  They are getting pretty big, in another couple of weeks they will go to meet all their nest mates.  It is still too cold to put them outside I think, oh but they are getting really interesting looking.  I will make comments on the pictures when I bring them on here tomorrow morning.  Have a most wonderful and beautifully awesome day, Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
winenutguy
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 58


Location: Bellingham Washington


« Reply #22 on: November 02, 2008, 02:31:07 PM »

Hi Cindi;
I just had to comment on how wonderful your chicks look and what a neat pen you and your husband made.  Would it be O.K. if I steal your idea?  We hope to start construction on our coop next weekend.  My wife's daughter has a boyfriend that is very handy with tools so we are going to recruit him to help.  I'll pass along some pics when we start.  Thank you very much for sharing these pics and your suggestions.
Best wishes, Marcus
Logged
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #23 on: November 03, 2008, 08:10:24 AM »

Marcus, thank you for the kind words, you have at it, copy anything that your lil' heart chooses.

This pen was built for the chicks that we incubated.  They had outgrown their original one and needed something bigger.  It was a late hatch and the weather was too cold to put them outside yet.  So they lived in this pen inside (with a heat lamp in case they became too cold) until this week.  They are now over a month old (born September 28), are totally feathered out, so they can go to their brooding pen at my Sister's yard.  When they are about 6 weeks old and go off of starter crumbles, they will join their friends in the adult chicken coop.

Growing like bad weeds, these guys are having the time of their life with actual earth that they can mosey around and churn up, and doing a mighty fine job of it too. I have pictures of them that I will be adding to the thread.  Good luck with your coop plans.  Have a great and wonderful day, Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #24 on: November 03, 2008, 09:33:33 AM »

Brian, the chicks are now about 34 days old.  They have moved to the brooding pen outside, still have a heat lamp for at night and oh they are lovin' life.  They are growing like bad weeds and all feathered out.  There are quite a number of pictures here, but I found it important to show you some great aspects of these birds.  Enjoy the pictures.  Have a great and most wonderful day, great health wishes for us all.  Cindi

This one was taken on October 17, they were only 3 weeks old then and oh did they ever love to face off with each other, all the time, cute



One of my incubated chicks is the one that looks like it has make up on.  There are 4 of the ones that have the lighter coloured faces.  They are your chicks.  They seem to hang out as a group, not mingling with the others very much.  What is their breeding?  No leg feathers.  Brahma/Orpington?  Please define if you can.  I am not quite getting this yet, hee, hee  Smiley Smiley



This is the only one that does not have any markings, state breed please?



This one has the less feathers on the leg, I think it is a rooster



This one appears to be a hen, she has more feathers on the legs than the other ones



A closeup of the feathery legged one





Just a pretty picture looking down on one of them



Always very interested in looking at the camera



The one that I think is a rooster, it has less feathery legs, but is getting those long tailfeathers



The Australorpe/Brahma crosses are getting a very few little feathers on their legs.  There is 3 roosters and one hen of that breed.



The chick that had the stripes on its back and black markings on its head, which you originally thought was the only purebred Brahma is now undistinguishable from the other Brahama/Xs.  They all look the same now, funny thing eh? 
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #25 on: November 03, 2008, 06:25:27 PM »

It's normal for the Brahma cross coloring to differ a bit when chicks but look very similar as adults.  The white on the bellies and chins of the Australorps is normal as chicks, as adults they are solid black.  The brown ones are also brahma/orpinton crosses with maybe a little Silke/Cochin thrown in.  It is likely the Australorps with feathered legs are crossed with the bantams. 
Orpington's are clean legged birds, Brahma's are feathered, the crosses can be either ranging from heavy to light feathering.  Feathering on the legs is called Muffing.  A feathered legged bird is referred to as being muffed.

Post some more pics in another month.

Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #26 on: November 04, 2008, 08:58:07 AM »

Brian, thank you for more clear definition and definition of leg feathers as muffed.  That is good to know, correct terminology when speaking "ling" is nice to have in the hand.  I will post more pictures in a month's time.  Have a great and wonderful day, great health wishes to us all. Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
EasternShore
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 361


Location: Chestertown Maryland

Tending 50K angry insects is just .........crazy!


WWW
« Reply #27 on: November 06, 2008, 04:50:49 PM »

Brian, have you had any issues with your turkey being in with your chickens? I just lost a red and was worried. PM ME please..kinda bummed out.
Logged

Anything worth doing is worth doing well.
We are the keepers, it is our duty to preserve life.
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #28 on: November 06, 2008, 08:34:20 PM »

I haven't experience any problems with having the turkeys in with the chickens, the size of those birds roosting on top of the chicken house keeps the hawks away.  The raccoons, now that's a different matter, so far I've lost 4 of my 6 Australorps to raccoons.  They climb over the fence and haul them off.  I think I'm loosing the Australorps because they like to roost outside on top of the pen around the chicken yard.  I just put in an order for enough poly netting to screen over the entire chicken yard to keep the predators out and the chickens in. 
Those Australorps have a tendency to be a bit wild acting (they are tame just act wild in nesting and roosting habits).
The netting will also keep the turkeys off the hot tin roof.  When a 30lb turkey lands on a tin roof it sounds like a thunder clap.
I have netting over the pigeon fly pen (aviary) and have, on occassion had a plummiting hawk use it for a trampoline.  But now that I temporarily have my brother's Impeyan Pheasants in the pigeon aviary too, to hawks don't do that any more.

It seems the secret of keeping hawks out of your fowl pens is having fowl too big for them to handle. the bigger ones protect the smaller ones.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #29 on: November 06, 2008, 10:03:51 PM »

Brian, I think EasternShore might have been referring to disease transference between the species, not something the birds may be doing physically to each other.  Maybe this was a misinterpretation, or maybe I just interpreted what his query was.

I had heard from somewhere that turkeys and chickens should never be kept together because of disease transference, I think one in particular was something called "blackhead", I am thinking it referred to the head blackening after death, not sure.

Anyways, I did do some looking at the Backyard Chicken forum about turkeys and chickens together, because I have them together too, and this did cause concern.  Some members there were saying they should not share the same areas, others say that they have had turkeys and chickens together for years with no problems.  That was comforting to me, because there was no way I could or would be interested in keeping the two species in separate areas, that would be a great difficulty.  That being said, Eastern Shore, is that what you meant by saying if there were any problems keeping turkeys with chickens.  I feel badly for you that you lost your red, the turkeys are very special birds for surely.

Now Brian, what a bummer about losing the Australorpes.  That must have peed ya right off!!!  I can't stand racoons.  I have lost stock many, many years ago from racoons.  Actually about 30 years ago, when I firstly began an interest in Muscovy ducks.  I had a wretched racoon come several times and pull the Muscovys right over their pen fence and out to the bush.  I stopped keeping birds for a good many years, to return to them during the past couple, only because the interest was sparked by my Sister.

What a job you are going to have to put that netting over the chicken yard eh?  I don't envy that.  Too bad that the Australorpes have such a wild side that they don't want to inside at night time, away from the side of the pen.  This is very disheartening to lose birds, I feel for ya.  Have a great day and life, great health.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
bassman1977
"King Bee"
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1787

Location: Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania


« Reply #30 on: November 07, 2008, 12:46:11 PM »

Dip those chicks into some marshmallow creme and sprinkle sugar to make marshmallow peeps  grin  Yum!

They are cute.  Too bad they didn't stay that way.
Logged

(\__/)
(='.'=)
(''')_(''')
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #31 on: November 07, 2008, 08:38:08 PM »

Brian, I think EasternShore might have been referring to disease transference between the species, not something the birds may be doing physically to each other.  Maybe this was a misinterpretation, or maybe I just interpreted what his query was.

I had heard from somewhere that turkeys and chickens should never be kept together because of disease transference, I think one in particular was something called "blackhead", I am thinking it referred to the head blackening after death, not sure.

  Cindi

I addressed the disease transference between species on a different thread.  It happens, sometimes, within species which is why having an incubation pen for your new poultry is prudent.  A 2-3 week waiting period can make a lot of difference in disease transference as it is most common when birds have been stressed by relocated.  Bees have the same problems, you stress a hive when moving it and you'll find things like chalkbrood, nosema, etc, more prevelant in the hives that were just relocated.  That is also one of the reasons commercial Beeks experience more disease issues than the hobbiests.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #32 on: November 27, 2008, 10:46:40 PM »

So on the 16th of this month, the incubated chicks that came from Brian's eggs were moved to join all their friends in the big chickenhouse.  They were born on September 28, so now they are coming up two months old torrow.  Oh what a day of fun that was.  The chickens, ducks and turkeys had the times of their lives looking at these strange new barnyard friends.  It is now been 11 days since they were moved to their new home, and they are just yesterday beginning to actually venture out of the house into the yard, step by step, off to the wild blue yonder.  The chicks are fully feathered out, beautiful and are beginning to look much more like adults these days, those pictures will come here soon.  I am proud of my babies, hee, hee.   Worked hard to bring them up, but well worth the effort.  Enjoy the pictures, and have that great, wonderful day, and health.  Cindi

This is them in the cage before we let them out



Richard couldn't understand why all these little birds all went into a corner, he was pretty curious too.

Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #33 on: November 28, 2008, 09:57:36 PM »

Need to see them a little more clearly please.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #34 on: November 29, 2008, 10:11:55 AM »

Brian, yep, I know.  Today I'll go out there and get some more closeups.  These birds are lookin' mighty fine.  There is three that are definitely the light Brahma look, four that are the AustralorpeX look, and I think that there are about 4 or so of the plain brown BrahmaXOrprington or something, then there is the single one (a hen) that must be the Orpington, and then 3 of mine. There is 15.  I have to tag the brown ones pretty quickly, they are getting so big they are beginning to look like my other younger brown ones that are only a couple of weeks older.  Anyways, I'll work on that today for you.  They are just beginning to venture out of the chickenbarn, that is almost 2 weeks that they have been too chicken to come out, hee, hee, like that pun.  I find the AustralorpeX are the most curious.  Yesterday when I let all the chickens out and then went to get some extra little foods for the young ones, one of the black ones followed me all the way to the food house, that was quite cute, guess he got caught up in the thought of the yummy little crumbles that he knew I was going to bring in for them.  They much prefer the crumbled over the laying pellets.  Beautiful and most great day, Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
winenutguy
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 58


Location: Bellingham Washington


« Reply #35 on: December 07, 2008, 11:55:55 AM »

Hi All;
Well, we started construction of the coop yesterday.  With the help of one of my wifes daughters boyfriend (whew!) we have made good progress.  I hope to be 90% done by the end of today.  A big thank you to Brian and Cindi for your suggestions!  I hope to download pictures soon.  Best to all!  Winenutguy.
Logged
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #36 on: December 07, 2008, 12:41:45 PM »

Marcus, yeah!!!  Go, go, go, can't wait for pictures!!!  You may even have some suggestions for us on improvements. Have that wonderful and most awesome life and day, health.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #37 on: February 20, 2009, 04:30:05 PM »

Wow, how time passes.  These chickens from Brian's eggs are now a few days short of 5 months.  One of the roosters is crowing.  Only have heard one so far (well, not that I'm there all the time).

Out of the 15 incubated eggs, there was only two hens (Brian, what the blipity blip went on there, smiling).

Heather, (the Light Brahma hen, I think she is purebred) who was so tiny and had to be brought into the house to heal (which she is, I will show more pictures soon on that thread I made  about her, she is a tough little cookie that is trying hard to get 100% better, almost, almost, she'll do it).  The only other female is one of the AustralorpeXLight Brama.  All the rest, men!!!

I have sold almost all the roosters, save 6, I have to make a decision on what to keep.  How many roosters can there be in a chickenyard, I haven't quite figured that one out yet.  This is important to answer this question, very important.......

I will lean on you Brian for what you would suggest.

I have two white roosters.  One looks very much like the purebred Brahma you have Brian, with the light brown feathers in his cape and saddle, very long feathers, he has a thin and big comb.  The other white one is a much bigger bird than his counterpart and has a small, comb, looks kind of like a rose comb, but not as thick.  He is white and black with absolutely no other colour, like the beige on the counterpart rooster.  Don't know which one to keep of these two.







There was 4 AustralorpeXbrahma.  I have kept the hen, and sold a rooster.   Again, two totally different types of combs, slight different looking with the cape feathers, both beautiful.

AustralorpeXbrahma roosters







The AustralorpeXbrahma hen



There was 8 of the BrahmaXOrpington roosters, I have two left.  I think that I am keeping both.  I don't have a picture of them.  They are far more bigger than the other roosters and oh man!!!  Are they ever heavy, way more heavy than the other roosters!!!  Beautiful day in this great life.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
poka-bee
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1651


Location: buckley wa

I am NEVER bored!!


WWW
« Reply #38 on: February 20, 2009, 05:32:33 PM »

Cindi, you have boys coming out your ears!  Are you gonna eat any? You are lucky to have the processor, I would go st run or let mine brood if I had someone to whack & clean em for me! You can tell in the pics who is a roo by the way their legs go, even in a pic there is that strut!  Just ordered Marans, Wellsummers & more EE's, they are fun! People love the different eggs. The lady that cuts my hair wants some so we will split.  I order pullets cause they are not 100% & I will probably get a roo & any of those will go well!  J
Logged

I'm covered in Beeesssss!  Eddie Izzard
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #39 on: February 20, 2009, 05:44:41 PM »

Jody, ya, go figure, 2 girls out of the bunch of boys (15 boys)!!!  I'm not too sure what to do with the extra roosters, I know I don't need too many and one would probably be just fine.  You know I am downsizing my birds.  I just cannot figure out what rooster I would need to keep.  I like all four different crosses and I think one is a pure Light Brahma breeding.  But I really don't think I can keep four roosters to 6 hens, I think that would be a bad scene.  Have a greatfully wonderous day, Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.978 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page July 21, 2014, 06:26:44 PM
anything