Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 23, 2014, 02:19:15 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: SHB Observation  (Read 6991 times)
Metrobee
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 8

Location: Columbus, Ohio


« on: August 30, 2008, 03:50:15 PM »

I just made an observation regarding the SHB: Earlier this year I drilled a 3/4" hole in the center of the top brood box per some instructions I read in a beekeeping book. The theory was it would increase air circulation in the hive. Soon after drilling the hole I found my first SHB. For whatever reason, I didn't link the two. I began trapping them in AJ's beetle eater but was still finding them hiding under the inner cover. On August 21, I killed about 20 under the inner cover and found about 12 in the beetle trap. On August 24 I decided there might be a correlation between the hole I had drilled and the SHB problem as I had never seen a bee come in or out of that hole and theorized that it was unprotected and thus an easy entrance for the SHB. That same day I closed the hole with a wine cork. Today I went into the hive to administer a powdered sugar shake against Varroa and only found 1 SHB hiding under the inner cover and 3 SHB in the trap. My theory is that too many openings may give the SHB unhindered access into the hive. It might be interesting to do an experiment with hives having only bottom entrances vs. hives having both bottom and top entrances--would the SHB load be the same or different within the same bee yard? Of course, this all may very well be coincidental and have nothing at all to do with the hole I drilled and plugged up. Any ideas?
Logged
sc-bee
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1861


Location: Edgefield, SC


« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2008, 04:20:47 PM »

>Of course, this all may very well be coincidental and have nothing at all to do with the hole I drilled and plugged up.

A guy here in cooperation w/ a university changed his entrances to just a piece of PVC pipe. Don't think it makes a whole lot of difference. Some folks don't like SBB for the same reason you stated.

All I know is I hate them angry!
Logged

John 3:16
dhood
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 84


Location: SC, USA


WWW
« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2008, 08:06:30 PM »

You may be on to something there huh, if they will seek out unguarded entrances than you could do as you stated and build a trap that they will enter into. It wouldn't catch all of them but it may help in controlling the numbers.
Logged

ArmucheeBee
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 514

Location: Rome, Georgia


« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2008, 10:48:41 PM »

I have a little problem with SHB.  I have watched them late in the evening (seems like they are most active then) fly right into my bottom entrance which is only 3/4 x 3/4 inches.  They are so quick and the bees attack them but it does little good and they just run right in.  I also think my 1/8 SBB is letting the smaller ones in. 

Here is my question:  Why has no one invented a chemical scent trap for these things?  Do they find their sexual partners by scent?  We have scent traps for everything except SHB and wax moth.  Seems odd to me with Billions attributed to pollination.
Logged

Stephen Stewart
2nd Grade Teacher

"You don't need a license to drive a sandwich."  SpongeBob Squarepants
TwT
Senior Forum
Global Moderator
Galactic Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3384


Location: Walker, La.

Ted


« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2008, 01:45:27 AM »

if you want to catch some get a empty hive with a pollen patty, you can catch buckets full in a few days especially this time of year. seems the best attractant to them is pollen patties. down south you just put enough in to last the bee's a day or two, if you put a whole one in they will lay eggs on the pattie and a few days beetles and larva everywhere.
Logged

THAT's ME TO THE LEFT JUST 5 YEARS FROM NOW!!!!!!!!

Never be afraid to try something new.
Amateurs built the ark,
Professionals built the Titanic
ArmucheeBee
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 514

Location: Rome, Georgia


« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2008, 10:19:41 AM »

So could you put in the pollen patty, kill the adults by smashing them, and then put the patty in the freezer to kill the eggs, take it out and just keep doing this over and over?  Any chance the bees would go after the patty too?
Logged

Stephen Stewart
2nd Grade Teacher

"You don't need a license to drive a sandwich."  SpongeBob Squarepants
TwT
Senior Forum
Global Moderator
Galactic Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3384


Location: Walker, La.

Ted


« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2008, 10:38:05 AM »

not sure but you can try, I believe that some bee's can handle SHB's and others can't (could be wrong but thats what I believe), it just like some bee's being resistant to V-mites and T-mites, I haven't had a problem with SHB's or mites, maybe because the hives I have are mostly from removals, now I see SHB's in my hives but no problems with them. I do kill what I can like most everyone. 
Logged

THAT's ME TO THE LEFT JUST 5 YEARS FROM NOW!!!!!!!!

Never be afraid to try something new.
Amateurs built the ark,
Professionals built the Titanic
Metrobee
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 8

Location: Columbus, Ohio


« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2008, 10:57:32 AM »

Update: My latest hive inspection revealed zero SHB's hiding under the inner cover and 3 were drowned in the trap. All this since I reduced the number of entrances from 2 to 1. I agree about the scent traps, it would be great for one to come out on the market. It wouldn't necessarily need to be positioned in the hive either, the trap could hang outside the hive in the beeyard and act as a lure to beetles in the hive to go out and seek the trap as well as to those heading for the hive to make a pit-stop at the trap.
Logged
rast
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 553

Location: Mascotte, Fl.


« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2008, 08:56:32 PM »

 My observation so far, four hives get full sun, (Fl.) two only get late PM sun. The four getting full sun have no beetles detected. The two shaded ones have beetles. I have read elsewhere that they don't like full sun. 
Logged

Fools argue; wise men discuss.
    --Paramahansa Yogananda
greenismycolor
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 149


Location: Double Springs, AL


« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2008, 01:16:11 AM »

Hi all

What happens to the Beetle in the winter months?

green
Logged

Believe!
sc-bee
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1861


Location: Edgefield, SC


« Reply #10 on: September 13, 2008, 09:21:40 PM »

They winter in the cluster Sad!
Logged

John 3:16
greenismycolor
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 149


Location: Double Springs, AL


« Reply #11 on: September 14, 2008, 01:44:19 AM »

thanks sc-bee....but that is not what i wanted to hear grrrrrrrrr.... :(I only have one hive left from these little booooggggers + robbing by hornets, bumble bees, yellow jackets. It is war!!!!!

green
Logged

Believe!
SgtMaj
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1464


Location: Corryton, TN


« Reply #12 on: September 14, 2008, 02:16:26 AM »

SHB's are kinda like wax moths... although, yeah, they pile on, they are more a symptom of an already weakened hive, as opposed to the (sole) cause.  If all else is right, they'll kick SHB's butts.
Logged
sc-bee
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1861


Location: Edgefield, SC


« Reply #13 on: September 16, 2008, 09:52:24 PM »

>If all else is right, they'll kick SHB's butts.

I disagree!!!

I feel this is true in some cases not all. Just like having bees in full sun. I think it helps but dosen't necesdsiarly elimnate them. Soil content sometimes has a bearing on the issue. I think alot depends on the agression of the bee. Some bees just don't chase and corral them. At least that has been my observation.

A stong hive definitely does help.

What have others  observations been?
Logged

John 3:16
TwT
Senior Forum
Global Moderator
Galactic Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3384


Location: Walker, La.

Ted


« Reply #14 on: September 16, 2008, 10:31:28 PM »

from what I have seen its the bee's that handle or doesn't handle the SHB, SHB's can take over a strong healthy hive in a week but this is rare but does happen but a strong hive does help, sun helps but I think soil helps more, SHB's just don't like red clay, I can have a weak nuc here and not have a problem but in most area's it would be doomed fast.

me and a few others here in Ga have been talking about this awhile, certain bee's handling SHB's and others don't, from what we seen there are just some hive's of bee's that beetle's dont affect like they do others. but any week hive in certain area's are doomed know matter what bee it is.
Logged

THAT's ME TO THE LEFT JUST 5 YEARS FROM NOW!!!!!!!!

Never be afraid to try something new.
Amateurs built the ark,
Professionals built the Titanic
greg spike
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 69

Location: Gainesville, GA


« Reply #15 on: September 17, 2008, 07:59:56 AM »

I had a minor outbreak a few months back. One thing I observed, they hide well in the bottom rail of split bottom frames. Sure, the bees will probably plug them up, but it takes time, giving them time to reproduce. I'll only buy groved frames from now on.

As far as control, I did signboard/borax traps, ground treatment with DE and crowded my weaker hive. I think the crowding really worked best. I went from seeing 10-20 beetles to one or two. The DE killed the five or six ant mounds within a ten foot radius of the hives, so hopefully it's getting any larvae that manage to get out.

I just don't think 100 percent control is possible.
Logged
sc-bee
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1861


Location: Edgefield, SC


« Reply #16 on: September 17, 2008, 09:18:35 AM »

Some folks are also opposed to screened bottom boards because they think it allows two much free access. I will remove screened bottom boards if I begin to see too many shb.
Logged

John 3:16
ArmucheeBee
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 514

Location: Rome, Georgia


« Reply #17 on: September 17, 2008, 11:41:58 AM »

sc-bee

I am starting to wonder if my SBB are letting the smaller SHB in the hive, too.
Logged

Stephen Stewart
2nd Grade Teacher

"You don't need a license to drive a sandwich."  SpongeBob Squarepants
Scadsobees
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3198


Location: Jenison, MI

Best use of smileys in a post award.


« Reply #18 on: September 17, 2008, 01:00:47 PM »

sc-bee

I am starting to wonder if my SBB are letting the smaller SHB in the hive, too.

Different areas, I find that my SBB actually keeps the beetles OUT of the hive.  The 1/8 inch screen will let all of the beetles except maybe some really large ones through.  The bees will chase the beetles out of the hive, through the SBB, where they will actually freeze to death.  We aren't freezing yet but will be soon,  I usually find a few on the bottom board .
Logged

Rick
sc-bee
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1861


Location: Edgefield, SC


« Reply #19 on: September 17, 2008, 09:24:33 PM »

Freezing is the one thing I don't have to worry about Smiley!
Logged

John 3:16
dhood
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 84


Location: SC, USA


WWW
« Reply #20 on: September 17, 2008, 11:14:52 PM »

I have hives with SBB and ones without. I have seen them go right thru the screen. But based upon what Iv'e seen this year, the ones with the SBB are dealing with the SHB's better.
Logged

ArmucheeBee
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 514

Location: Rome, Georgia


« Reply #21 on: September 18, 2008, 07:48:28 AM »

I'm about to move my weak hive into a OB hive in the garage (enclosed).  Do you generally see a reduction in SHB because of the length of the entrance (tube) that goes to the outside?  Mine is about 1.5 feet thru the wall.   I am going to try to remove all the SHB I can find on the frames before I put them in the OB.  My probelm will be when I see a SHB through the glass and will not be able to SMASH IT!   Because the hive is at the house, I may cork and uncork the tube each night and morning until it gets cold enough that SHB are gone.
Logged

Stephen Stewart
2nd Grade Teacher

"You don't need a license to drive a sandwich."  SpongeBob Squarepants
Scadsobees
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3198


Location: Jenison, MI

Best use of smileys in a post award.


« Reply #22 on: September 18, 2008, 02:28:14 PM »

I'm about to move my weak hive into a OB hive in the garage (enclosed).  Do you generally see a reduction in SHB because of the length of the entrance (tube) that goes to the outside?  Mine is about 1.5 feet thru the wall.   I am going to try to remove all the SHB I can find on the frames before I put them in the OB.  My probelm will be when I see a SHB through the glass and will not be able to SMASH IT!   Because the hive is at the house, I may cork and uncork the tube each night and morning until it gets cold enough that SHB are gone.

No change...the SHB scoot through the tube like anything else!

My observations: SHB like the warmer area, they will stay there all day long, corking would be ineffective.  Make sure that there are no areas where the bees can't get to.

If you can go with Plexi instead of glass then you will have the opportunity to drill holes and remove/kill the little beasts.  (it is more $$$).  I have two small areas that the bees can't get to: one along the side between the glass and the wood, and that was nice because they'd squeeze in there, then I'd just push the glass in and smash the beetles.  The other are was next to a frame and I drilled some small holes and vacuumed them out Smiley

The key is to keep them well fed and not stressed, that will get the SHB going more than anything will.

Rick
Logged

Rick
ArmucheeBee
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 514

Location: Rome, Georgia


« Reply #23 on: September 19, 2008, 10:07:15 AM »

I put the bees in the OB hive last night.  It went really easy.  I only lost about 30-40 bees that I could not round up.  I see one SHB now.  I have the white PF 120 frames and that makes them really stand out.  I also have two black PF frames.  Don't buy those if you have SHB.  You can see queen eggs easier but not beetles.  So tonight after they calm down I'm going in with my little flat bladed screwdriver and smashing some SHB. 

I also may move my queen.  She is on an old comb frame of honey I put at the very top of eight frames and there is an empty frame in between her and the drawn frames.  I wanted to weed out this frame after the brood hatches and get rid of it.  I wonder if she will come down on her own?  Any thoughts.  8-frame med. OB.
Logged

Stephen Stewart
2nd Grade Teacher

"You don't need a license to drive a sandwich."  SpongeBob Squarepants
SgtMaj
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1464


Location: Corryton, TN


« Reply #24 on: September 20, 2008, 06:18:34 AM »

Re the SBB, if you're concerned about it, seal it off with a mite count board and something to cover the open side.  When I built my SBB, I made the open-side face forward, and built a removable landing pad that seals the SBB off.  The seal isn't 100% perfect, but it would prevent most things from coming through.
Logged
greg spike
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 69

Location: Gainesville, GA


« Reply #25 on: September 20, 2008, 11:34:23 AM »

Yeah, but even if perfectly sealed a sbb could give them tons of room to hide inside the hive. They don't seem to have much of a problem getting through the front door.
Logged
SgtMaj
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1464


Location: Corryton, TN


« Reply #26 on: September 20, 2008, 10:20:06 PM »

True, but you could coat the mite board in some kind of substance that kills them when they come in contact with it.  Would have to be very strong though, wouldn't want half-dead beetles tracking whatever it is through the hive.
Logged
SlickMick
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 590


Location: Brisbane, Australia


« Reply #27 on: March 10, 2009, 07:46:43 AM »

if you want to catch some get a empty hive with a pollen patty, you can catch buckets full in a few days especially this time of year. seems the best attractant to them is pollen patties. down south you just put enough in to last the bee's a day or two, if you put a whole one in they will lay eggs on the pattie and a few days beetles and larva everywhere.

This brings up the potential to use a control measure for the SHB outside the hive by lacing the pollen pattie with an appropriate bait.

Of concern however, (disregarding the use of a chemical bait) would be the introduction of large numbers of SHB into the region of an apiary. I sure would not want to have to deal with increased numbers in the vicinity of my hives having sufficient numbers at present for me to be continuously vigilant. It may however present an opportunity to attract the SHB away from a hive/s if bait stations were positioned around the perimeter of the apiary.
Logged

On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #28 on: March 10, 2009, 06:48:33 PM »

if you want to catch some get a empty hive with a pollen patty, you can catch buckets full in a few days especially this time of year. seems the best attractant to them is pollen patties. down south you just put enough in to last the bee's a day or two, if you put a whole one in they will lay eggs on the pattie and a few days beetles and larva everywhere.

This brings up the potential to use a control measure for the SHB outside the hive by lacing the pollen pattie with an appropriate bait.

Of concern however, (disregarding the use of a chemical bait) would be the introduction of large numbers of SHB into the region of an apiary. I sure would not want to have to deal with increased numbers in the vicinity of my hives having sufficient numbers at present for me to be continuously vigilant. It may however present an opportunity to attract the SHB away from a hive/s if bait stations were positioned around the perimeter of the apiary.

And run the risk of poisoning your own hives that attempt to make use of the bait patty.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
SlickMick
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 590


Location: Brisbane, Australia


« Reply #29 on: March 10, 2009, 07:10:50 PM »

That is true embarassed unless the bait station allowed only the SHB access ie a 1.5mm entry.
Logged

On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.382 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page July 20, 2014, 08:20:11 PM
anything