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Author Topic: Outdoor Furnaces  (Read 2739 times)
Pond Creek Farm
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« on: August 22, 2008, 10:10:02 PM »

I am considering heating with wood after receiving a $4000 propane bill for the coming year.  Do any of you have any experience with these appliances?  I have forty acres of hardwood to cut the wood from.  I like the idea of using Missouri oak rather than oil.  Any thoughts?
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Brian
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« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2008, 11:38:57 PM »

$400 for a year's supply of propane?  That would only pay for 45 days of heating my house last winter Cry

Does this count as an outdoor furnace?
<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/dbroberg/2238183892/" >[/url]

We used it tonight. It's also great for wiener roasts and s'mores.
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Pond Creek Farm
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« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2008, 12:04:41 AM »

Not Four hundred: Four thousand.  I like the weenie roasts too, but I was thinking along the lines of a water heating wood furnace for heat exchange with the house.
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Brian
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« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2008, 07:30:36 AM »

I've heated my house (and hot water) with a central boiler outdoor wood furnace for 12 years now.   It is the only heat I use.   What is nice about them is you can burn any kind of wood.  I find pine and hemlock works great in the Fall and Spring when you don't need a lot of heat but need to keep it going.  The soft wood doesn't build up coals like hardwood, otherwise you end up with 2 feet deep of coals.  Furthermore,  a lot of tree removal guys have trouble getting rid of soft wood and will cut it and drop it off right in my yard for free. 

I know there are a lot of brands out there, many more than when I purchased mine 12 years ago.  But I would strongly suggest spending the little extra on the Central Boiler brand.  The have been in it for many years, have an excellent proven product and keep up on the new technology.

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deantn
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« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2008, 08:59:15 AM »

Thought mine was bad at almost $2500.00 a year to heat and cook .
Burning wood is a bigger job than you think it is. Cutting the tree down then cutting it up, hauling it, stacking it, splitting it and cleaning up debris afterwards. Loading wood stove and cleaning it out, desposing of the ashes, etc.
Good luck with the adventure it is.
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« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2008, 09:56:31 AM »

Thought mine was bad at almost $2500.00 a year to heat and cook .
Burning wood is a bigger job than you think it is. Cutting the tree down then cutting it up, hauling it, stacking it, splitting it and cleaning up debris afterwards. Loading wood stove and cleaning it out, desposing of the ashes, etc.
Good luck with the adventure it is.

And every one of those tasks manages to keep you warm!! grin grin
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octagon
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« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2008, 11:40:13 AM »

My furnace and hot water will cost about 6200.00 this yr. We burnt wood from 64 til about 1987, when the last kid left, we retired the wood stove.wish i was younger, i'd burn it again. I do cut about 10-12 cord to sell every yr though. this yr it's about 250 per cord around here. I'll sell for 200. picked up in my yd, I don't have the ambition to load it anymore.
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« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2008, 11:57:40 AM »

My furnace and hot water will cost about 6200.00 this yr. We burnt wood from 64 til about 1987, when the last kid left, we retired the wood stove.wish i was younger, i'd burn it again. I do cut about 10-12 cord to sell every yr though. this yr it's about 250 per cord around here. I'll sell for 200. picked up in my yd, I don't have the ambition to load it anymore.

I burn between 10-12 cord a year.  If I did the math right, you would be saving yourself a boatload of money if you didn't sell the wood you cut, but burn it instead.
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octagon
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« Reply #8 on: August 23, 2008, 01:30:27 PM »



I burn between 10-12 cord a year.  If I did the math right, you would be saving yourself a boatload of money if you didn't sell the wood you cut, but burn it instead.

 true, but my wife runs a home for senior citizens in one side of the house and the BOH and insurance companies would never allow it. It takes one senior to pay the over head. heat, water,lights, dish. land and school taxes. and everything is deductable.
 I should just cut 35 cord to sell and it would even out, but then i'd have to buy a couple mules or a team to draw out the wood and at my age, i don't want to wrestle with them any more. right now i'm drawing it out with cable and snatch blocks with a 35 yr old chevy PU.
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« Reply #9 on: August 23, 2008, 09:11:34 PM »

Gotcha,   I'm just hoping I'll be able to still cut 10-12 cords when I'm retired too.  It is a lot of work,  but I look at it as good exercise to keep me health.  Why pay to go to a gym when I can cut and split wood.  Where abouts in NY are you located?


rob...
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octagon
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« Reply #10 on: August 24, 2008, 12:35:52 AM »

Gotcha,   I'm just hoping I'll be able to still cut 10-12 cords when I'm retired too.  It is a lot of work,  but I look at it as good exercise to keep me health.  Why pay to go to a gym when I can cut and split wood.  Where abouts in NY are you located?


rob...
over the bridge in dutchess county on the Ct. border near Millerton.
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« Reply #11 on: August 24, 2008, 09:05:27 AM »

If you've never tried heating your home with wood before, I'd suggest getting one or even two cheap and simple woodburning stoves first. Try those for a year or two, and then consider upgrading to a full-blown outdoor furnace set-up. It's just my personal experience, but from what I've seen people who gradually shift away from propane or electric heating tend to have more success than people who dive in whole-hog before they really get a taste for it.

Plus, that way if you find you don't like it in the first year, you've invested a lot less with a woodburning stove or two, than with all the plumbing and things required with a boiler system.
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Irwin
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« Reply #12 on: August 24, 2008, 09:43:55 AM »

All heat sources are different. Wood will heat me up faster then oil or electric. It takes me about four cord's a year. Wood is a dryer heat then oil so I would put a tea pot of water on the wood stove. I had to live where there was electric heat only and I had a problem with the grandkid's getting cold's went back to wood and the problem was gone.
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« Reply #13 on: August 24, 2008, 10:44:56 AM »

There is no comparing indoor wood stoves with outdoor wood furnaces.  At least from the "feeling" stand point.   I guess having a small indoor will get you the experience of cutting wood and such, but that is about it.   In fact,  you might be turned off by an indoor woodstove because of the smoke, dirt, ashes that end up in your house.  With the outdoor wood furnace,  you get none of the mess in the house,  and the heat "feels" the same as your furnace because you are just pumping hot water from the outdoor furnace to your current heating system.
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RogerB
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« Reply #14 on: August 24, 2008, 11:16:40 AM »

We've heated 1800 Sq Ft with a Taylor outside heater for 5 or 6 years.  We had heated with an insert previously.  As Rob said, it's a lot cleaner than hauling the wood through the house.  Another advantage is the size of the wood. If you can lift it, you can burn it.  They aren't very efficient but if your wood is free and your health is good it's a no-brainer.    Our combined gas and electric Duke Energy bill in the Cincinnati area last winter ran about $140 to $150.

Although I've never had a breakdown, one of the strong selling points of the Taylor was that all the parts are carried buy Grainger.

The negative is that I'll be 67 in October and I wonder how much longer I can keep this up.

Roger
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« Reply #15 on: August 24, 2008, 11:27:21 AM »

I see people around (new people, up from the city) here buying those out door furnaces and don't see where they are saving any money.
 6 to 12 thousand for the furnace, then it has to be be hooked up. they have to buy wood for about a thousand dollars a load for what the driver tells them is 7-8 cord after it's cut, split and stacked.(and it's going up every day) I see other people buy 800 dollar stoves at Farm T and after a few weeks they find out that burning wood is not fun, it's like having a part time job on top of their reg job, the stove winds up out by the Rd with a sign, must sell-600. so they can buy fuel oil. they didn't know green wood from seasoned wood, nor do they have any idea what the damper or draft is for. they just bought everything that the 25 yr old cleck said they would need and the clerk had never had anything to do with a wood stove except move them on the floor and stack the shrink wrapped wood outside the store that is 7 dollars for four pieces of wood.
 Maybe if they had their own wood, they may save after a few years.
  another thing that is being brought up at the town board meeting around here lately is people are complaining about their neighbors with the stoves because the smoke is going in their windows, they may even pass a law against them or make it so rough with rules and regs,ins, that it wouldn't pay to own one.  
 I fire my old stoves up a couple times a yr when no one is home but me just to say that i used it to fall under the new laws if they're passed, but i burnt wood for over 45 yrs here,(i was burning wood when oil was 14 cents a gallon) and some people up in the village think i still burn it as they see wood stacked all over the place.
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« Reply #16 on: August 24, 2008, 11:36:08 AM »

We've heated 1800 Sq Ft with a Taylor outside heater for 5 or 6 years.  We had heated with an insert previously.  As Rob said, it's a lot cleaner than hauling the wood through the house.  Another advantage is the size of the wood. If you can lift it, you can burn it.  They aren't very efficient but if your wood is free and your health is good it's a no-brainer.    Our combined gas and electric Duke Energy bill in the Cincinnati area last winter ran about $140 to $150.

Although I've never had a breakdown, one of the strong selling points of the Taylor was that all the parts are carried buy Grainger.

The negative is that I'll be 67 in October and I wonder how much longer I can keep this up.

Roger

 I have a friend that is only 62 and he was taken sick in Feb, 08, he just now returned home from the hos and nursing homes,Aug 19th , but he's in the same fix, two giant wood burning stoves that take a 4 ft, piece of wood and are hooked up to the oil fired furnace so that the fan pushes the heat up to the house.
  he's a big guy, 6'5" tough and thought nothing could ever happen to him and i kept telling him over the yrs that he should make thing so his family could take over if anything should happen to him. Now he's on the list for kidney.

 he's a welder and had another giant home made stove in the shop, now both are useless.
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