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Author Topic: My garden pics.  (Read 1912 times)
JordanM
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« on: August 22, 2008, 07:17:44 PM »

Here is the front of the garden.
[img=http://img153.imageshack.us/img153/3522/dsc00599bs4.th.jpg]http://
From front to back there is Nasterium, red popies, a pink flower, zinnias, cleomes wild flowers and canas.





Here is a huge row of sunflowers i just throw them all in right next to each other and they get pretty thick, i will take a picture of them when they are all in bloom.



These are wild sunflowers that came up on there own this year on the corner of the garden and they are the first ones to bloom.



Here is the pumpkins and gourds that  the bees love.








« Last Edit: August 23, 2008, 09:38:49 AM by JordanM » Logged

Jessaboo
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« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2008, 11:55:27 PM »

That's not a garden, that's a FARM!!

I envy your weed free rows! My stuff just grows everywhere - including weeds.

Love the pics of the sunflower with the three bumbles on it - two of them look like eyes and there is the faintest hint of a smile on the sunflower, too! Anyone else see it?

I have been meaning to ask someone with sunflowers the size of yours - will those stalks decompose well in a compost pit? They look like they would take years to actually break down.

- Jess
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2008, 01:03:51 AM »

That's not a garden, that's a FARM!!

Oh, yeah, she;s from New Jersey where anything bigger than a city lot is a farm.

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I envy your weed free rows! My stuff just grows everywhere - including weeds.

 Like weeds?  Mulch with hay...you'll have more orchard and quack grass than you can pull.

Quote
Love the pics of the sunflower with the three bumbles on it - two of them look like eyes and there is the faintest hint of a smile on the sunflower, too! Anyone else see it?

Hey, you're not the only one with a touch of whimmsy.

Quote
I have been meaning to ask someone with sunflowers the size of yours - will those stalks decompose well in a compost pit? They look like they would take years to actually break down.

- Jess

If it's organic it will compost in a matter of weeks.  If it's metals it takes a few decades while plastics takes centuries.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
JordanM
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« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2008, 09:13:19 AM »

That's not a garden, that's a FARM!!

I envy your weed free rows! My stuff just grows everywhere - including weeds.

Love the pics of the sunflower with the three bumbles on it - two of them look like eyes and there is the faintest hint of a smile on the sunflower, too! Anyone else see it?

I have been meaning to ask someone with sunflowers the size of yours - will those stalks decompose well in a compost pit? They look like they would take years to actually break down.

- Jess

The reason thre is no weeds is because i just got done rottertilling it and i hoe it every day.

You are quite a good observationist i didnt see the smiley face the first time i put the pictures on here but now that i look at it i can see it.

The stalks can get 4 inches wide if they are by themselves but the ones in the one row that are real close together usually get to be an inch and they decompose the first year the 4 inch ones take about 2 years, i usually dig them out and throw them in the mulch pile rather than rotter till them under and have big sticks next year.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2008, 06:15:35 PM by JordanM » Logged

JP
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« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2008, 09:44:35 AM »

Very nice!!


...JP
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Cindi
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« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2008, 01:59:28 PM »

Jordan, beautiful, beautiful pictures and the word "wow" says it all.  Lovely.  I grow the cannas that you are growing, I think the cultivar is "King Humbert" and that they are indeed!!!  Mine are not yet blooming, (I don't think), but should be soon.  I like how you have your flowers growing in those beautiful rows, and the cleomes are beautiful!!!  I grow cleomes too.

I have a patch of sunflowers that self-seeds and they were growing about two inches apart.  I had the dilliest of a time thinning them out.  But I did, I left about a foot and a half between each plant, I think I disgarded probably a thousand.  I am thinking that the flowers get bigger if the plants are thinned, that was my reasoning.  But I love how yours look.  Have the most wonderful and awesomely fabulous day, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Jessaboo
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« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2008, 05:44:53 PM »

Oh, yeah, she;s from New Jersey where anything bigger than a city lot is a farm.

You got that right Brian! I have a 12 x 18 garden and the neighbors call ME "farmgirl"! Actually I am from South Jersey - if you've never been here I will tell you that there is a huge difference between "South" Jersey and "North Jersey" (ie: New York)- we have quite a few farms not very far from me. After all, Jersey is "The Garden State"

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Like weeds?  Mulch with hay...you'll have more orchard and quack grass than you can pull.

Like my gardening guru says, "Straw is for gardens, hay is for horses"

Quote
Hey, you're not the only one with a touch of whimmsy.

Well, you've certainly made THAT clear!! It wasn't so much my touch of whimsy I was concerned about as my sanity...

Quote
If it's organic it will compost in a matter of weeks.  If it's metals it takes a few decades while plastics takes centuries.

I try to stay away from those plastic sunflowers. The bees don't seem to like them.  Smiley

- Jess
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Cindi
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« Reply #7 on: August 24, 2008, 10:10:04 AM »

Quote
like weeds?  Mulch with hay...you'll have more orchard and quack grass than you can pull.

Like my gardening guru says, "Straw is for gardens, hay is for horses"

Quack grass.  Cooch grass.  Are they one in the same?  I remember many years ago when we first moved to our place (about 18 years ago), the previous owners had horses, we had horses too, I always manured the gardens, always had lots of grass weeds.  This is going a little off topic I know, but I have to say something.  It brings about a memory about cooch grass.  I had spent eons of time removing this grass that grew specifically in one part of the garden.  The farrier was over one time, he was an old dude, many years my senior (think I have caught up to him now, hee, hee).  I was telling him about the grass.  Backtracking.....My Sister had been over one day and had said to me, oh, you have lots of cooch grass.  Well, to me, grass is grass, plain and simple.  Quack grass, cooch grass, I don't know, I  like that name anyways, kind of a ducky kind of sound, I do like certain words alot, words intrigue me.  Anyways on with the story.  So I was telling the farrier about the "cooch" grass.  He looked at me with this funny look, remember, this was about say now 16 years ago.  He said to me, "I haven't heard that type of grass called that for a long time, we called it quack grass.  So.....tell me more about this quack grass.  Is it the green grass that has the long, long, long, tough, tough, white underground roots?  Sorry for ramblin' and a little off topic, but my curiosity gets the better of me and I have a compelling need to know things.  Have the most wonderful, beautiful day, lovin', livin' this great life we all love, live and share  Smiley Smiley Smiley  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
mtman1849
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« Reply #8 on: August 24, 2008, 02:57:22 PM »

Great garden good job
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #9 on: August 25, 2008, 11:45:46 PM »

Quack grass = crab grass = cooch grass pluss a few other localized names.  All depands are where you're at, or where you're from.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
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