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Author Topic: Difference between organic and bio beekeeping  (Read 5055 times)
drone1952
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« on: October 08, 2007, 12:59:40 PM »

Sorry for asking you but can you help me the difference between organic and bio beekeeping. I’m a little bit confused. So, can you help?
George

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Kirk-o
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« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2007, 05:44:37 PM »

Well Buddy it depends on your definition.Organic Natural to me means I beekeep without the use of any chemicals .I don't treat for mites or anything.I have small cell and natural cells in my hives.You can go to Beesource.com or Organic Beekeepers on Yahoo and if you want the Practical hot Scoop go to Bushbees.com that should fix you up.I don't know about the Biological Beekeeping definition though
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2007, 07:21:25 PM »

>Sorry for asking you but can you help me the difference between organic and bio beekeeping. I’m a little bit confused. So, can you help?

There is no clear cut definitions.  I think the trend to "bio" is because "organic" is now the property of the government and they get to define it so narrowly that no one can meet that definition.
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drone1952
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« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2007, 09:53:23 PM »

Hi,
As far as I know reading in Bee-l contribution Bio Bekeeping use the principles based on R. Stiener (?) findings.
George
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Vetch
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« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2008, 11:21:17 AM »

Hi,
As far as I know reading in Bee-l contribution Bio Bekeeping use the principles based on R. Stiener (?) findings.
George

The Rudolph Steiner movement uses the term 'biodynamic' for agricultural practices that meet their ideas.  I think it is trademarked and you need to be certified to use that term. Biodynamic is stricter than definitions of 'organic' in many ways. 
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spacebee
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« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2008, 10:57:24 AM »

Biodynamic food is certified by an organization called Demeter, based in Germany.
I think 'bio' - pronounced 'bee-o' - is used in parts of Europe and is synonymous with 'organic'.
I have seen 'bio' used elsewhere - '§¤«£¿æ' - for example - but I don't think there is an official definition for the term.
'Organic' certainly has a legal definition in Europe - and now, I think, in the USA, and cannot be used on a food label unless the manufacturer is certified by an approved certifying body, who will ensure that the appropriate standards are maintained.
 
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hellnogmo
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« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2009, 12:42:57 AM »

It seems Juliette Levy, Steiner and consideration of the bioregion is bio beekeeping.
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« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2009, 01:01:39 AM »

Hey Gang:

To the new people here, please add your location to your profile found 5 spots over from the HOME button below your avatar photo. Thanks. Welcome to the forum and if you receive warning messages concerning a website address specializing in biological beekeeping - heed the message, certain sites for administraive reasons are NOT allowed to have links posted to them here and it is important to follow the warnings.

Otherwise, best wishes and enjoy the forum.
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BjornBee
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« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2009, 08:59:07 AM »

Most states have very clear outlined standards and procedures for being certified organic. It has to do with what goes into your hives. It has to do with treatments and feed. It has to do with land use studies. And so.

I always scratch my head when someone mentions smallcell, top bar hives, or a certain type hive, in connection of describing organic. Organic has nothing to do with what size cell you keep, what type box you keep, etc. Organic hives can be certified (if at all possible ) in standard hives, or any other hive that comes to mind.

People need to keep in mind such things as the J. Berry article last month in Bee Culture. In attempts to get clean beeswax, she went all the way to Brazil (or was it Argentina) to a place where no mite controls are used and no beekeeper induced chemicals are used. (A place where much "organic" honey comes from). She brought back comb and had it tested. So dirty and riddled with chemicals was the comb that she could not use it for testing.

I recently had my pollen tested, and in one yard in particular, three types of chemicals found there way into the pollen. And just like those hives in Brazil, I use no chems myself. But the chemicals are there.

So for anyone even mentioning they have organic honey, organic hives, your probably fooling yourself, without testing. And I would be very cautious about making any claims. Part of the certification process is doing a land use study to list ALL chems used in and around the apiary location. Why? Because time and time again, it is seen very clear that whether you put the chems in the hives means little in whether your producing "organic" product. It needs to go beyond that simplified and misused idea that because one does not use miticides, one can claim or beat around the bush of being "organic".

You don't want to be certified organic, then step up to the plate and have your honey, comb and pollen tested. I bet you will be surprised to find out that your so-called "organic" hive falls far short of anything close to the standard.

I'm not a backer of the standard for organic. I question if anything being brought into this country is even organic. But we should at least be up in understanding what organic is. Because sooner or later, someone is going to have a problem with some honey or pollen that was sold with vague claims of being organic.
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