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Author Topic: What To DO about the Bees and Comb???  (Read 1104 times)
TapStoneBees
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« on: August 17, 2008, 01:38:02 PM »

Greetings,

Just wondering what ya'll think that I should do.

I have 3 hives that have each decided to build comb on the roof of the hive, under the inner cover.
I had left a shallow spacer in each for space for feeding, and they decided to build comb in the empty space.

Suggestions as to what I should do would be great and helpful.

Looking forward to the advice.
JT
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Bill W.
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« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2008, 02:55:07 PM »

How much comb?

If it is top to bottom in the super, you can cut it out and band it into frames.  If it is less, you may just want to remove it.

When you've got open space in the hive, you really need to inspect often and remove unwanted comb before it gets out of control.
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TapStoneBees
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« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2008, 04:14:27 PM »

There is quite a bit of comb.
Probably four or five frames worth with brood, pollen and honey.
I have never done the tie in on a frame. How do you do that and what do you use? What kind of wire??
Will Floral wire work, or light gauge copper wire??
Then do I just wire it into the frame instead of using foundation, tie this in?  Can I go through the comb to like sew it in??
Answers would be helpful.
Cheers,
JT
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rast
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« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2008, 05:04:00 PM »

 I have done it two ways.
 1  bare frames. cut the comb to fit keeping the up side of the comb up. Up being the the top of the combs the way the bees made it. Use 3 or 4 rubber bands vertically to hold it in place. Try to keep it centered vertically as much as possible.
 2  Frames that are prewired. Cut the comb to fit. Up side up. Lay the comb on the frame and carefully heating the wire with a battery push the comb into the wire until centered.
 3 Oh yeah, I forgot I used the hinged frame comb traps once, but I liked heating the wires better.
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rast
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« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2008, 05:06:39 PM »

 Oh yeah 2, I would ditch the spacer and correct the "bee space" after removing the comb
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Bill W.
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« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2008, 06:55:38 PM »

A picture is worth a thousand words:

http://www.beesbythesea.com/Bees_by_the_Sea_Apiary/Photos/Pages/Removals_2008.html#19

I brush off the bees, cut the comb to fit (I try to get it to fit tightly, so there is just a bit of resistance putting it into the frame), put the rubber bands on the ends of the frame, hold the comb in place, and then slide the rubber bands over it.  You can do this yourself, but it helps to have an extra pair of hands.

Brand new combs are very flimsy and easy to crush.  You have to be very careful with them.

You can find a lot more pics in the removal forum.
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jojoroxx
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« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2008, 04:28:57 PM »

I saw a video on you tube where the gent filled the air space in the empty feeder super with loosely rumpled newspapers to prevent the building of burr comb. It has worked for me, sometimes the bees nibble on the paper though.. Undecided
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Ross
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« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2008, 04:39:59 PM »

I would put an excluder under the spacer.  Make sure the queen is down below.  Let the brood hatch.  Remove the spacer, scrap the comb, let the bees have the honey back.
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TapStoneBees
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« Reply #8 on: August 18, 2008, 05:36:34 PM »

Thanks to all for the info,
I am going to try some of both, since I have enough hives to do it with.
Great learning experience.
I really like the tip too about the newspaper, sounds like a simple solution.

Again Folks,
Thank You,
JT
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