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Author Topic: How much beehives in the country  (Read 4819 times)
Finman
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« on: January 08, 2005, 12:09:51 PM »

In Finland we have
Beekeepers all, 3.400

   - professionals, 80

   - partly professionals, 400

   - for  hobby 2.900

hives 46.000

During few years 30% number of  beekeepers have diminished.

Half of the country is suitable for beekeeping.
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Jay
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« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2005, 12:19:37 AM »

Where do you fall into all those numbers Finman? Cheesy
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By the rude bridge that arched the flood
Their flag to Aprils breeze unfurled
Here once the embattled farmers stood
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Finman
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« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2005, 12:48:57 AM »

Quote from: Jay
Where do you fall into all those numbers Finman? Cheesy


Figures are from Home sites of Association of Finnish Beekeepers
Look down this page


http://www.hunaja.net/smlkoti/tilastot/tilastot.htm

Spesiaalitietoja  = special data

 

Mehiläishoitajia yhteensä, 3.400 = beekeepers together

   - ammattimehiläishoitajia, 80 = professional beekeepers

   - sivu- ja liitännäishoitajia, 400 = side and main keepeers

   - harrastajahoitajia, 2.900 = hobby keepers

Mehiläispesiä, 46.000 = hives
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Jay
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« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2005, 12:54:54 AM »

Cool pictures Finman. But actually what I meant was, what percentage is your apiery of the national average, or are you less than 1% with your own personal hives. You seem to have a lot of hives, that's why I ask. Cheesy
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By the rude bridge that arched the flood
Their flag to Aprils breeze unfurled
Here once the embattled farmers stood
And fired the shot heard round the world
-Emerson
Finman
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« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2005, 02:11:40 AM »

Quote from: Jay
Cool pictures Finman. But actually what I meant was, what percentage is your apiery of the national average, or are you less than 1% with your own personal hives. You seem to have a lot of hives, that's why I ask. Cheesy


I am normal hobby -beekeeper. I have had about 13-15 productive hives.
That is number which I can nurse during one day when I go to my summer place. During winter number is 17-18.

I may have more nucs but in autumn I put them together. 4-6 mating nucs together and I got one normal hive.
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Sting
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« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2005, 04:06:16 PM »

In Canada: (population: 32.5 million; area: 9.98 million sq. Kms. or 3.9 million sq. miles)

There are approximately 10,000 beekeepers operating a total of 600,000 colonies of honeybees.

The ratio of commercially-operated bee colonies to those owned by hobbyists is 4:1.  Therefore, we have 120,000 hobby colonies and 480,000 commercial ones.

3 out of 4 Beekeepers are hobbyists. 7,500 hobbyists and 2,500 pros.

Honey Production
Canada produces 70 million pounds (32 million Kg.) of honey annually. (Approximately one third of the crop is from the province of Alberta, one third from Saskatchewan and Manitoba and one third from the rest of country.) Half of all honey produced is exported, most to the USA.  We eat the rest.
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"Where the bee sucks, there suck I." William Shakespeare: The Tempest.

My apiary is about 17 kms. (10 miles) NW (back & left) of this web-cam view:  'See any of my girls?
http://www.parliamenthill.gc.ca/text/hillcam_e.html
Finman
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« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2005, 05:08:45 PM »

Quote from: Sting
In Canada:
There are approximately 10,000 beekeepers operating a total of 600,000 colonies of honeybees.

 Honey 32 million Kg..


In finland 5 milj inhabitants

We produce 0,3 kg honey/ inhabitant, Canada 3 times that figure= 1kg.

beekeepers per 1000 inhabitants  = In Finland  0,7  
Canada  0,26 .

Clear figures!

Honey crop per hive in Finland 35 kg/hive, in Canada 53 kg.  
Canada 53% more per hive.

Very GOOD!
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Sting
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« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2005, 05:13:59 PM »

We need to produce a lot of honey to feed to our hockey players so that they have plenty of energy to beat those pesky Rooskies.
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"Where the bee sucks, there suck I." William Shakespeare: The Tempest.

My apiary is about 17 kms. (10 miles) NW (back & left) of this web-cam view:  'See any of my girls?
http://www.parliamenthill.gc.ca/text/hillcam_e.html
golfpsycho
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« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2005, 09:10:56 PM »

STOP IT!!  yer killing me.... bahahahahahahahha.. pesky rooskies
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asleitch
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« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2005, 03:56:22 AM »

I'm told England and Wales (not Scotland and Northern Ireland which maintain their own statistics) that the number of beekeepers is around 30,000. The total number of hives is around 100,000 to 200,000. That works out at an average of 3-6 hives/person

Adam
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Finman
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« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2005, 05:46:55 PM »

Sweden


(ice hockey!)

inhabitants      9 000 000

14 000 beekeeper
145 000 colony.  
 
v. 2003 varroa contaminated 44%.
 
Consumption 6500 ton,
own production 3300 ton  
honey per hive  23 kg
Consumption   0,7 kg /inhabitant,

production 0,4 kg /inhabitant,
 
beekeepers / 1000 inhabitants  = 1,6  

(Yied per hive is small/Canada)
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Sting
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« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2005, 10:29:54 PM »

OK: How about Australia?

Population: 20 million
Area: 7.7 million square kilometers (3 million sq. miles)

The following information is from the Australian Honeybee Industry Council web site (see hyper-link below)
____________________
Australia is among the top honey producing nations in the world, exporting about half of what it produces.
 
The main honey producing countries are:
Russia
United States of America
Argentina
Mexico
Canada
China
West Germany
Hungary
Greece
Australia

Australia’s main honey markets are the:
Federal Republic of Germany
United Kingdom

Most of the honey that is exported comes from main-stream commercial beekeepers who number about 2,000 and who may own between 40 and 2000 hives. Because the seasons affect the amount of blossom, beekeepers have to move their hives from place to place to find a good supply of nectar and pollen.

A strong hive has about 30,000 bees flying from blossom to blossom all day long. Each bee can visit thousands of blossoms in a single day.

The Australian honey industry produces 30,000 tonnes of honey annually.

There are around 673,000 registered hives in Australia, producing not only honey and beeswax but also live bees (queens and package bees), and other products such as pollen and royal jelly.

Around 467,000 hives are operated by beekeepers with a minimum of 200 hives, and these are considered to represent the commercial industry. It is estimated that an average of at least 30,000 tonnes of honey are produced each year in Australia, with nearly 45% of this total coming from beekeepers resident in NSW. Between 9,000 and 12,000 tonnes of honey are exported each year.

Commercial operators are reported to produce up to 145 kg of honey per hive per year (Manning 1992).  Figures from the Queensland beekeeping industry (personal communication) indicate that 5-year average production levels of 75 kg per hive per year can be expected.

http://www.honeybee.org.au/economics.htm

Very interesting.  But they don't play hockey, Finman.
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"Where the bee sucks, there suck I." William Shakespeare: The Tempest.

My apiary is about 17 kms. (10 miles) NW (back & left) of this web-cam view:  'See any of my girls?
http://www.parliamenthill.gc.ca/text/hillcam_e.html
Finman
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« Reply #12 on: January 12, 2005, 03:37:48 AM »

Sting:
Quote
[Commercial operators are reported to produce up to 145 kg of honey per hive per year (Manning 1992).  Figures from the Queensland beekeeping industry (personal communication) indicate that 5-year average production levels of 75 kg per hive per year can be expected.

http://www.honeybee.org.au/economics.htm

Very interesting.  But they don't play hockey, Finman.


They don't understand hockey but they have that tremendous rugby "catch where you can". It is best played in rain fall.

One professional beekeeper from Finland was in Australia and he reported that Aussi beekeeper get yield 11 month during year. We get during 2 month.  That is why they can keep much hives. - And they have landscapes

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Finman
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« Reply #13 on: January 12, 2005, 03:55:24 AM »

According new "something" following countries can import honey to Europen Union

Language is from Norway

Argentina
Australien
Belize
Bulgarien
Brasilien
Chile
El Salvador
USA
Guatemala
Indien
Israel
Jamaica
Kanada
Kenya
Kina (nytt land i listan enligt beslutet 2004/685/EG)
Kroatien
Kuba
Mexiko
Moldova
Nicaragua
Norge
Nya Zeeland
Paraguay
Rumänien
Ryssland
San Marino
Serbien och Montenegro
Schweiz
Sydafrika
Taiwan
Tanzania
Thailand
Turkiet
Ukraina
Uruguay
Vietnam
Zambia
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Finman
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« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2005, 07:50:25 AM »

Heather honey in Norway

http://www.scottishbeekeepers.org.uk/schools/hnorway.htm
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asleitch
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« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2005, 08:09:12 AM »

The links at the bottom of the page were very interesting. i have copied them again below.

# Here are a couple more links that will be of interest in this context - with english text, and excellent pictures on Per-Olof Gustafsson's swedish site: http://www.algonet.se/~beeman/biodling/ljung/ling.htm  moving bees to the heather
# http://www.algonet.se/~beeman/biodling/ljung/ling-2.htm extracting heather honey, including 3 pictures of the sjoelis honey loosener (2 close-ups)
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eivindm
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« Reply #16 on: January 12, 2005, 08:20:25 AM »

Quote from: Finman


For those of you that read this I can just mention that my grandfather had a Sjøli honey loosener which is absolutely needed for heather honey but very expensive.  He actually knew Mr. Sjøli aswell smiley  A very cool device for thick honey.
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