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Author Topic: Read a good book lately? I need one!  (Read 3545 times)
johnnybigfish
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« on: August 10, 2008, 09:22:54 PM »

 Has anybody read a good book lately?
 I need one. Im tired of getting a book and it being a lousy read.
I liked Stephen Kings recent book Duma key, but not many of hiis writings over the last 1o years or so. I just read "The Judas Strain".and it was ok,..I dont like political stuff or CIA stuff... not much for biographys...I have enough bee books to keep me busy. Any suggestions?

your friend,
john
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« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2008, 09:36:04 PM »

I don't know if you're into history or not, but I just finished Volume 1 and 2 of The Liberation Trilogy by Rick Atkinson, and they make for some pretty incredible reading. Book 1 is called An Army at Dawn and covers the war in Africa at the beginning of WW2. Book 2 is called The Day of Battle and covers the war in Sicily and Italy. Book 3 won't be out until next year, but it will cover the Normandy Invasion and the war across Europe.

I'm not generally a big history buff, and even when I like history I don't like military history all that much, but I really enjoyed the first two books a lot. Most military histories I've read either focused too much on the individual soldiers (so you couldn't tell what was going on with the war) or too much on the big picture (with nothing about the guys on the ground) but Atkinson really gets a good balance between the two and it makes for great reading.
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« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2008, 10:20:53 PM »

How about the biography on Johnny Cash?  I read it a few years agoo and really liked it. 
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Brian
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« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2008, 11:16:01 PM »

Never ever ask a librarian for a good book.....

You didn't say what you liked about the King book but it seems you and I fell off the King bandwagon around the same time. Here are some folks I used to fill the gap -

Chuck Palahniuk - maybe because of his unpronounceable last name this guy is truly messed in the head. I think his best book is Rant (about a "patient zero" that transmits a human form of the rabies virus. the story is told thru bits and pieces of "interviews" - it is a great, if sick, book with a real twist at the end) but his latest book, Snuff, was good too. He wrote Fight Club and Choke, both of which have been made into movies (and are also good reads).

Carl Hiaasen - a great combo of comedy, action and environmentalism. I know that sounds a bit weird so you will just have to trust me on this one. I really enjoyed Skinny Dip - a young woman pushed off a cruise boat by her lover boy washes up on a ex-private detectives island and revenge ensues. He has quite a few books and can keep you busy for awhile.

Joe Lansdale - some of his books I love, some - not so much. I loved Freezer Burn which took place around a carnival midway - I love books involving "freaks", carnivals, circuses, etc. and this one fit the bill. He is also a bit off his rocker but I like that in a writer.

I know you said you don't really want non-fiction but as a beekeeper I have to assume you are into nature a bit. The Orchid Thief by Susan Orleans was a great read and not all bogged down in dates and facts like a lot of nonfic can be. It reads very much like a novel.

I def have to recommend all of Mary Roach's books (even though they are all non fic) - she wrote Stiff (about what happens to us when we die), Spook (about the science of trying to determine an afterlife) and Bonk (about....sex). Roach is considered a science writer but trust me when I say you never had this much fun in science class (or learned so much). She is a wonderful writer about unusual topics and keeps you laughing about things you really shouldn't be laughing at.

I hope at least one of these will end up being a winner?!
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kathyp
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« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2008, 11:50:58 PM »

i have gone back to Ken Follett.  i read Pillars of The Earth when it first came out and loved it.  just finished finished World Without End, the sequel.  also read A Place Called Freedom.  all really excellent books!  i tend to go with authors until i burn out on them, then i try someone new. 

i am also doing the Sue Graffton alphabet mystery/murder books for some light reading. 

another good book i read this year was The Religion By Tim Willocks. 

Duma Key was good.  i'm with you.  i was off SK for awhile, but that was kind of like his old work.

David Morrell is good.  John Saul. Michael Connelly
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

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« Reply #5 on: August 11, 2008, 01:23:45 AM »

Just finished "Eat, Pray, Love". Forgot the authors name as the book is out being shared with someone in my office. This is just a wonderful, happy adventure about a women's travels and adventures in different countries.
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randydrivesabus
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« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2008, 06:04:35 AM »

have you read Omnivores Dilemma?
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« Reply #7 on: August 11, 2008, 06:22:25 AM »

Quote from: Jessaboo
Spook (about the science of trying to determine an afterlife)
If you're interested in the subject (and who isn't, to some extent?) there's a book called Life Before Life by Jim Tucker that I would heartily recommend. He's a researcher at UVA who has spent the last 20 years or so applying rigourous scientific method to studying claims of reincarnation. It's kind of dry (he's a scientist, not an author, after all) but it's a major mind-bender of a book.

Quote from: Jessaboo
she wrote Stiff (about what happens to us when we die)
I second that recommendation. That's a great book.

Quote from: Jessaboo
Bonk (about....sex)
Thanks, that's a good tip. I hadn't read that one, but I just Amazon'd it.
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« Reply #8 on: August 11, 2008, 08:20:11 AM »

Go to Your Public Library - and look it over, thousands of books on anything & everything !!

Brand new editions, 50+ year ago editions, and everything in between !!

Probably free if you live in the city limits, we live in the county so have too pay a $15.00 yearly fee for the wife & myself.
 BEST $15.00 a year we spend !!

Bee-Bop
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« Reply #9 on: August 11, 2008, 09:45:43 AM »

ours are paid for through the county tax system.  i'd be ticked to pay for a library card!!

also look and see if you have an online download system through your library.  the military has one if you qualify.  it's a great way to get reading done while you do other stuff.  just takes a little practice to listen and work.  at first your mind wanders, but listening to audio books is a skill like any other.  practice smiley
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
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« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2008, 11:16:09 AM »

"The Innocent Man" by Grisham. True story and a good read too.

My favorite books of all times are the james herriot books- All Creatures great and Small, The lord god made them all, All things bright and beautiful and All things Wise and wonderful. Easy read, makes  you laugh and cry and grin and all good human emotions

I also really enjoyed, Unduanted Courage, about lewis and Clark
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« Reply #11 on: August 11, 2008, 05:58:22 PM »

Chasing the bloom isn't a novel by any means but is s pretty good story if you like a beekeeping story.
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johnnybigfish
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« Reply #12 on: August 11, 2008, 07:48:53 PM »

....Oh boy,.....
 I'll get Janelle in here when she comes in to print all this stuff for me. I'm not a big reader but I need to get back to doing it. I read several books mentioned here. Ive never heard of mary roach but she sounds like my kinda girl! I saw EPand L,( Annettes book) on Oprah! grin( Oprah,.....see why I have to get back to reading???).."Pillars" was GREAT!
 My wife listens to books she gets from the library, but she is always late getting them back. I used to really like the "Ashes" books by William Johnstone, But after he started rebuilding europe(after he rebuilt America) it was getting a little out of hand.
Ok,...I'm building a list now..If I could only read and walk at the same time without getting run over I'd be doing great!
thanks to all of you!

your friend,
john
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kathyp
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« Reply #13 on: August 11, 2008, 09:42:47 PM »

if you like Pillars of The Earth, you'll like World Without End.  every bit as good as the first.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #14 on: August 12, 2008, 10:22:19 PM »

"The Innocent Man" by Grisham. True story and a good read too.

My favorite books of all times are the james herriot books- All Creatures great and Small, The lord god made them all, All things bright and beautiful and All things Wise and wonderful. Easy read, makes  you laugh and cry and grin and all good human emotions

I also really enjoyed, Unduanted Courage, about lewis and Clark

His latest, Playing for Pizza is a real change of pace from the majority of his writings.  Pro-American style Football in Italy.  I think I've reall all of Grisham's books.  James Patterson's Alex Cross and The Women's Murder Club series, Jonathan Kellerman's Alex Delaware series and Tony Hillerman's Joe Leaphorn series are always a good bet for a recreational read if you like police and suspense.  I also like Piers Anthony's Xanth novels for a good laugh and lots of puns. 

Side Note: His next Xanth novel is suppose to have a character named Alexi Thema, submitted by your's truly, whose talent is stealing emotions.   Since I suffer from the condition I thought it might make a good character for Piers...he was estactic about the name and talent and said he would use it.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
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« Reply #15 on: August 16, 2008, 01:28:48 AM »

    There was a book written a while back called "A Murder in Coweta County" .  It's been a long time and I've forgotten most of it.  I remember I liked it and I'm not much of a fan of that type of book.  If memory serves it was made into a movie starring Johnny Cash.  But my memory is iffy at best sometimes.
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Everyone said it couldn't be done. But he with a chuckle replied, "I won't be one to say it is so, until I give it a try."  So he buckled right in with a trace of a grin.  If he had a worry he hid it and he started to sing as he tackled that thing that couldn't be done, and he did it.  (unknown)
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« Reply #16 on: August 18, 2008, 04:12:40 AM »

i guess the three authors i read the most would hafta be tony hillerman(mystery)  anne mc caffery(scifi) and louis la mour(western historical)  but there are other good ones out there,  btw mc caffery's sone picked up on some of her less mentioned creatures and wrote two novels around them the one i read was real good
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« Reply #17 on: August 18, 2008, 09:04:05 PM »

 I love to back to old classics every decade or so. Huck Finn, Tom Sawer, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, etc. Just enjoyable, relaxing reading.
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« Reply #18 on: August 19, 2008, 07:04:17 AM »

The Old man and the Sea, Hemmingway, the best book ever written. Short, sharp, beautiful to read in the sun on a lazy day. This book is sublime.

We Were Soldiers, Once and Young, the second best book ever written.

A Fortunate Life, A.B. Facey, the finest Australian book ever written.



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bassman1977
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« Reply #19 on: August 19, 2008, 09:24:31 AM »

I recommend anything by J. A. Jance.  I read a lot of her books while in Iraq.
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #20 on: August 20, 2008, 11:43:29 PM »

I like anything by John Nance.  Aviation is in his blood and he writes well.

If you liked Huckleberry Finn, Tom Sawyer, and Rascal (Sterling North) you'd love my memiors.  It's a good mix of all three done in the 1950's and 60's.  I'm just about ready to send it off to an agent...so many to choose from and I want one that would also be interested in my short stories, westerns (fiction but historically correct), Fantasy, and Sci-Fi stuff.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
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« Reply #21 on: August 21, 2008, 10:39:28 AM »

Brian, one day I wanna read all your stuff!!!!  Cindi
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