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Author Topic: linseed oil instead of paint  (Read 3016 times)
filmmlif
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« on: January 07, 2005, 08:44:41 PM »

has anyone ever just used linseed oil on the deeps instead of paint? i want a natural look and have heard linseed alone works great. any info out there?
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golfpsycho
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« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2005, 10:19:20 PM »

Just use it  on the outside.  Nothing on the inside, and it will be fine.  Remember to dispose of the applicators properly, whether you use a rag or towel, brush or whatever.  Linseed oil can become spontaneously combustible if left on rags or towels.
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filmmlif
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« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2005, 11:07:35 PM »

will the linseed oil last or is there stain a better way to go.
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golfpsycho
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« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2005, 11:43:51 PM »

I think it will last a similar time as paint.  You'll have to reapply it as it wears off
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Finman
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« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2005, 03:40:17 AM »

I keep paint necessary because its duty is protect wood against contamination and rain.

Hand are in honey and has propolis. Rain spatter soil against wood.
Bees defecate on walls after winter.

I dot not care, what hives look like. I want only much  honey!

1/3 of my boxes are polyuretan. Also they are painted.
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Jay
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« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2005, 12:49:39 AM »

Linseed oil does not have the u.v.blockers that are in stain so your maintenance may be higher than with stain.

Golfpsycho is right about the rags spontaniously combusting so be careful of your used rags or use boiled rather than raw linseed oil. With the boiled linseed oil you don't have the danger of the rags bursting into flames like you do with the raw linseed oil. Hope this helps, good luck! Cheesy
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asleitch
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« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2005, 03:30:45 AM »

I use linseed oil on my hives, and haven't had any problems. I just slap it on with a paintbrush, and wipe the excess off after half an hour with a rag. I thought you could get combustion of rags from Boiled Linseed Oil? As it's faster drying the reaction is faster and more heat is generated. Anyway either dunk your cloths in water, or lay them out flat (pref. outside). I stand my paintbrushes upside down in a glass jar.

The wood soaks it up on the first application - normally I'd put two on the first time I use it.

Here's a brand new one glued, finished and oiled.



Here's it is later in the season!

I reckon you'd get two seasons without refinishing.

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JWW
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« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2006, 03:03:54 PM »

I worked in a paint store for many years and the old timers that bought linseed oil used to say that applying linseed to wood, "once a day for a week, once a week for a month, once a month for a year and once a year for a lifetime". In using it on hives this old saying could be modified but the point was it works great as a wood preservative. I'm going to use it on my new hives.
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Finsky
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« Reply #8 on: March 05, 2006, 03:25:04 PM »

White color of hive is usefull because sun does not make   hive hot.

Here I have 40 years old latex paint on deeps.  Hot hive is serious problem when bees ought to carry in heavy load of nectar. They stop working.

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Michael Bush
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« Reply #9 on: March 06, 2006, 11:13:49 AM »

Lindseed oil works fine.  The wood will still eventually turn silver gray, but it will take it longer.

Not all lindseed oil seems to do it but some will catch a cotton rag on fire if you leave the rag setting around.  I would definintely NOT put it in the garage or leave it anywhere you wouldn't want it bursting into flames.
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Michael Bush
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