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Author Topic: Where do you set your supers?  (Read 2062 times)
charlescfry
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« on: August 07, 2008, 10:38:53 PM »

OK - when I take the time to really look at a hive and pull it apart, I always end up wondering where to set the supers. Frames are in them and I want to pop the whole thing off and set it... where?!?!?!

I always seem to mash bees, disrupt frames, etc. Just how do you place your supers full of frames so you can take a look deeper into the hive? What am I missing here? Placing them on the ground is uneven and awkward... stacking more than one can be tippy... well, you get the point.

Thanks for the advice and opinions...
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Charles Fry
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pdmattox
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« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2008, 10:44:57 PM »

Well not sure of the method for a hilly location but here in the flatlands of florida we take the hive apart and set the boxes on the narrow end (front of the hive) down. Maybe if you took a piece of ply wood and a brick (or something) to make level area for you to do the same.
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SgtMaj
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« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2008, 10:50:13 PM »

How many hives do you have?  If you don't have many, you could just bring an extra hive-stand out with you to set them on.
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the kid
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« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2008, 10:51:44 PM »

we take off the cover put it upside down on the ground ,,,,   I lean the inner cover agest the hive ,,,,,    I put the next box I take off I on the cover ,, this way If it happens to have the queen in she cann't drop on the ground ,,,,   and I put the next on top of the first ,  and just keep stacking  til Im done
this way you have less chance of droping the queen
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sc-bee
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« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2008, 11:01:14 PM »

Usually on the top(not inner cover) stack as you go, this also helps keep them clean----sometimes I lay them on the side as mentioned above, but have tipped them and had a mess!
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John 3:16
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« Reply #5 on: August 07, 2008, 11:02:57 PM »

Put them on edge -and set them on the hive closest that is the right hieght -i have found that when working many hives it is easyer to take one or two steps without bending over -than to all of a sudden have something go  click in your back and then a electric shock shoots down your leg and it is hard to drive for a week because it is to hard to push in the clutch-but intill it happens to you just set them on the top you have already removed good as places as any -there is no wrong way to do it inless you put it somplace upside down - and yes i have done that to cheesy RDY-B
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sc-bee
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« Reply #6 on: August 07, 2008, 11:19:16 PM »

So have I rdy-b  shocked!
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John 3:16
SgtMaj
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« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2008, 11:29:22 PM »

Know what's good for back problems?  Boot camp.  I used to have BAD back problems... like when it went out I couldn't walk that day.  I haven't had it happen since boot camp, which was more than 13 years ago.
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Dane Bramage
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« Reply #8 on: August 07, 2008, 11:49:07 PM »

I usually set them on top of the adjacent hive(s).  I also often carry around a longish (convertible) hand-truck (especially when harvesting).
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sc-bee
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« Reply #9 on: August 08, 2008, 12:04:22 AM »

Wow, ain't that neat Wink!
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John 3:16
rdy-b
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« Reply #10 on: August 08, 2008, 12:06:36 AM »

yea wheres a brother get one of those cool RDY-B
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SgtMaj
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« Reply #11 on: August 08, 2008, 01:12:42 AM »

yea wheres a brother get one of those cool RDY-B

From Uline...
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jojoroxx
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« Reply #12 on: August 08, 2008, 12:18:06 PM »

I have an issue with this one too. I work on a hillside as well and we dug out a level area where I have a couple pallets that I placed the hives on .... I can see already I should have stabilized it more, perhaps raised it up on pier blocks (ANTS!!! - difficult to control on a pallet-) and given myself more space to put stuff....

I do like the idea of using the other hive.

I'd never considered, or heard of setting them on their side!?!?!? Won't the bottom end of the frames shift when you tip it sideways, and possibly crush bees? Maybe I'd have to see it in motion.

Verrrry cool forum, it is peaceful and i always learn something!

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SgtMaj
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« Reply #13 on: August 08, 2008, 12:25:07 PM »

I'd never considered, or heard of setting them on their side!?!?!? Won't the bottom end of the frames shift when you tip it sideways, and possibly crush bees? Maybe I'd have to see it in motion.

Not if you only tip it in the direction that leaves the frames up on end so that either the left or right side of the frame is facing down, and don't go past 90 degrees or they'll fall out the top of the super.
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kathyp
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« Reply #14 on: August 08, 2008, 12:43:49 PM »

i have an aluminum hive stand that i can move along the row of hives.  sometimes i just flip the lid over and set the box on that.  depends on how motivated i am and how deep i'm going.
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« Reply #15 on: August 08, 2008, 01:13:52 PM »

On the telescoping cover.  If it is upside down you can set the box on it a quarter turn offset so that there is plenty of stability but not too much contact, off the ground.  Then continue to stack up on it, boxes stay in order for re-assembly.

If I've got to change box positions, I'll take the one that I want to move out of the stack and lean it against another hive, only contacts 2 edges, minimum bee carnage.

Harvesting is a whole different animal...then I don't worry about smooshing bees 'cuz they should be mostly out.

Rick
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Rick
rdy-b
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« Reply #16 on: August 08, 2008, 05:08:17 PM »

I have an issue with this one too. I work on a hillside as well and we dug out a level area where I have a couple pallets that I placed the hives on .... I can see already I should have stabilized it more, perhaps raised it up on pier blocks (ANTS!!! - difficult to control on a pallet-) and given myself more space to put stuff....

I do like the idea of using the other hive.

I'd never considered, or heard of setting them on their side!?!?!? Won't the bottom end of the frames shift when you tip it sideways, and possibly crush bees? Maybe I'd have to see it in motion.

Verrrry cool forum, it is peaceful and i always learn something!


when i set them on a hive close by i set them on the short side -so i guess i actually set them on end -I guess- any way it helps keep the top of that colony clean from honey   that may leak out so as i dont invite problems that exposed honey can bring after i walk away - such as robing and of course ants-the suppers are very easy to manage this way weather on top of a close by colony or on a clean top lying on the ground -after awhile handling the boxes with ease becomes second nature  cool RDY-B
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annette
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« Reply #17 on: August 08, 2008, 06:00:15 PM »

I have an issue with this one too. I work on a hillside as well and we dug out a level area where I have a couple pallets that I placed the hives on .... I can see already I should have stabilized it more, perhaps raised it up on pier blocks (ANTS!!! - difficult to control on a pallet-) and given myself more space to put stuff....

I do like the idea of using the other hive.

I'd never considered, or heard of setting them on their side!?!?!? Won't the bottom end of the frames shift when you tip it sideways, and possibly crush bees? Maybe I'd have to see it in motion.

Verrrry cool forum, it is peaceful and i always learn something!




Please enter this photo into the beekeeping for dummies book. He is looking for new photos for his cover. This is absolutely beautiful and you can see the bees shiney eyes. Just love it.

Annette
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