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Author Topic: Buckwheat  (Read 3580 times)
Keith13
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« on: August 07, 2008, 09:56:41 AM »

Does Buckwheat grow in the deep south? If it does what variety or species rather grows down here?

Thanks,
Keith
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kathyp
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« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2008, 02:26:32 PM »

http://www.jeffersoninstitute.org/pubs/buckwheat.shtml

i think you can grow it about anywhere.  it won't take frost, so it's done when the weather gets cold.  it is drought resistant for sure!  i love it and will turn over an entire field to it next year.  thanks to cindi for getting me started on it!!
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Keith13
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« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2008, 02:43:25 PM »

Thanks Kathy!
Where did you get your seed from? Also I don't plan to harvest when the buckwheat is done, so will the local wildlife ( turkey, doves, etc.) eat the seeds? Also will the deer eat buckwheat? I have to watch what I plant with them, they mow everything down

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Keith
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randydrivesabus
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« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2008, 07:54:09 PM »

the buckwheat will reseed itself and reappear in the future. not as thick as the first time around because there will be more weed competition.
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pdmattox
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« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2008, 10:32:42 PM »

It grows great here in north florida and will definatly reseed itself over and over. A added benifit is that it requires no fertilizer and can be planted as a cover crop.
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EasternShore
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« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2008, 07:15:30 AM »

Hey folks, Need to know how much the buckwheat costs, in general. My landowner has about 75 acres to plant and I would be willing to pay for seed if he plants it. How does it help my bee's?
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MarkF
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« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2008, 09:43:17 AM »

Where I am it was selling at 79cents/lb.
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randydrivesabus
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« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2008, 11:31:55 AM »

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/afcm/buckwheat.html

more than you ever wanted to know about buckwheat.
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greg spike
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« Reply #8 on: August 08, 2008, 06:03:07 PM »

Good thread guys, I was curious about buckwheat in the south too. Much obliged if someone with direct experience growing it in the Dirty South would drop some knowledge on us.

(The crop produces seed within one month after planting and continues to flower and produce seed until killing frosts occur.)
....from the alternative field crop manual.

Can it really bloom continuously?

At what temps. do flowers wilt off?

If planted too early, will flowering resume when fall temps. drop off?

I do love buckwheat pancakes, but is buckwheat honey good on em?
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kathyp
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« Reply #9 on: August 08, 2008, 06:21:35 PM »

i paid 45 dollars for 50 lbs.  had to special order it.  next year i'll by 100 more lbs and finish that pasture. 

here is how it worked at my place.  i planted in an the old cow pasture where i keep my hives.  nothing had been done to this pasture in 5 years except mowing.  i did a superficial rototilling.  just enough to break up the surface.  i scatter planted just before a rain storm, but the next week the temps went to 100 and the week after down to 60.  there was some rain between planting and very early june, then none.  in spite of minimal rain after germination and early growth, the bloom was prolific.  we have had only a couple of days of minimal rain since the 9th of june.  even so, and with no irrigation, the buckwheat is still blooming and the bees are still on it.  the main bloom is done, but there is a chance of more growth if the rain comes and the frost hold off until the end of september.

we had snow and freezing temps into april and early may.  i hope that a normal spring next year will allow for earlier planting next year, and a better crop.  my plan is to break the ground up a little again, finish planting the pasture, and over seed the area already planted if there is extra seed.  otherwise, i'll just leave it and see what comes back up.

pretty impressive crop.  minimal work to plant.  no maintenance.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
MarkF
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« Reply #10 on: August 08, 2008, 07:13:26 PM »

Kathy how many acres did you do and what sort of honey yield did you get.
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kathyp
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« Reply #11 on: August 08, 2008, 07:31:39 PM »

i only did about .5 acre in the buckwheat as a test.  next year will be about 2 acres and if that goes well, maybe another 2 or 3 the next year.

as for yield, probably only a few pounds this year.  i messed up this spring and didn't feed as long as i should have.  the spring was so bad, and i didn't keep as close an eye on things as i should have.  because of the bad weather/forage, and my inattention, they hives were set back badly.  i lost one and almost lost a 2nd.  it is from a couple of good swarms that i'll get whatever honey i get.  my overwintered hives were sad this year sad
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
MarkF
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« Reply #12 on: August 08, 2008, 07:50:22 PM »

I am planning to do the same thing next year. I have my pigs turning over a field (about 1 acre) for me this year in the spring I'll harrow it and sow with buckwheat. And put the pigs to work on the next field. one of the links above said the an acre of buckwheat could yield 150lb of honey to a strong hive.
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greg spike
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« Reply #13 on: August 13, 2008, 09:54:00 AM »

Thanks for the rundown Kathy.
   I think i'll try planting it next year.
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dpence
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« Reply #14 on: August 13, 2008, 11:28:03 AM »

How are you guys planting it?  I broadcast mine and then lightly till it under.  Has anyone used a grain drill?  Just curious.  The window for planting it in Missouri is over but I have some that is in bloom now and the girls are working it. 

David
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Melilem
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« Reply #15 on: October 08, 2008, 01:12:41 PM »

That's a lot of buckwheat honey...
We looked into buckwheat and found Japanese folks that would provide the seed and pay you to grow it. Apparently the Japanese love buckwheat. Buckwheat honey is dark and strong flavored. I don't care for it.
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charlescfry
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« Reply #16 on: October 09, 2008, 07:57:44 PM »

you can drill in buckwheat, but i would broadcast it (use a fertilizer spreader) and disc it in - especially if i was doing 75 acres. follow the recommendation of the local extension office on rates and planting dates - it is common enough they will have info.

do NOT buy the seed from some on-line place that sells it by the pound. you can find a local ag supplier that will sell you seed at lower costs than these places that think a 50# bag is a lot. if it were available, i would find a mill that sells "bin run" buckwheat and just use that - no need for a special variety if you just want cover and bee crop.

as mentioned, the plant dies at frost (or anything close to frost!) but if you don't harvest it, you will definitely have more buckwheat the next year! it will rapidly reseed and keep coming back.

if you have never seen it, it is an odd looking seed - sort of a pyramid shape, pointy and hard, with a tough seed coat. might not feed so well in some drills - another reason i would just spread it.
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Charles Fry
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EasternShore
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« Reply #17 on: November 06, 2008, 04:56:25 PM »

Was told by master beek that buckwheat in my area does not provide nectar. His reasoning was that it needed cool nights. Comments?
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Anything worth doing is worth doing well.
We are the keepers, it is our duty to preserve life.
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