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Author Topic: Plastic drone frame  (Read 2060 times)
Jim Stovall
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Jim Stovall


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« on: August 05, 2008, 11:18:38 AM »

I just got a supplemental catalogue from Brushy Mountain, and there's a "plastic drone frame" as one of the featured items. It says, "Put one in each colony and reduce your mites naturally by removing and freezing." Does anyone have any experience with this to say how well it works? I had never seen this before and had never heard anyone mention it.

Thanks,

Jim
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Bill W.
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« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2008, 11:32:13 AM »

I have a couple hives that have drawn it out fully and pulling the drones seems helpful.

However, most of my hives have ignored it, or drawn a few cells and put honey in them.

I don't plan to buy any more.
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Scadsobees
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« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2008, 12:42:46 PM »

You can get the same effect by placing an empty frame (no foundation) in the middle of the hive tight between 2 brood frames.  The bees will fill it all up with drone brood.  Once it is mostly capped, freeze and return it.

The tricky part is getting them at the right time to freeze... a little early and they won't be capped, therefore no mites trapped...a little late and you have a bunch of extra drones.

The nice thing about using a foundationless frame is that you can also cut out the drone brood and use for fishing bait if you want to.

Rick
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Rick
Michael Bush
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« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2008, 09:10:40 PM »

Try a search.  This has been discussed many times before.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
SgtMaj
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« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2008, 12:20:19 AM »

The nice thing about using a foundationless frame is that you can also cut out the drone brood and use for fishing bait if you want to.

Rick

Rick, Not a bad idea at all!  I like it.  I'll bet the bluegill do too.
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Parksguyy
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« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2012, 09:05:48 AM »

Hey there, new beek here and I use them in both my hives, I run with double brood chambers.
Initially, the bees drew the foundation out and filled it with honey, like any other frame ... so that had me concerned.  I have them placed in position #4.  Shortly afterwards, I noticed the one in the bottom brood chamber were now full of brood, at this point I was inspecting my hives every week, so I knew when that brood occurred.  I pulled them after 21days, froze them for two days and then reinstalled them.  I dropped the drone frames that were in the top chamber into the emply slot in the bottom and will basically rotate those frames in that manner.  After frozen, I did inspect the brood but found no mites!  If one does the count should be very low given that these were new nucs and would have been treated prior to me getting them.  I also use screened bottom boards as well ... I don't want to regularly treat with chemicals for mites, and don't seen the need using this intergrated pest management tools).  Just ensure you pull your frames around day 21, if not you just increased your mite load!
     
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Jim 134
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« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2012, 10:25:03 AM »

You can get the same effect by placing an empty frame (no foundation) in the middle of the hive tight between 2 brood frames.  The bees will fill it all up with drone brood.  Once it is mostly capped, freeze and return it.

The tricky part is getting them at the right time to freeze... a little early and they won't be capped, therefore no mites trapped...a little late and you have a bunch of extra drones.

The nice thing about using a foundationless frame is that you can also cut out the drone brood and use for fishing bait if you want to.

Rick


 And mites!   shocked


   BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
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JPBEEGETTER
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« Reply #7 on: October 23, 2012, 03:16:09 PM »

 So what Jim , Fish like mites also  he he JPP
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