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Author Topic: Queen Rearing  (Read 30842 times)
TwT
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« on: January 02, 2005, 09:08:33 AM »

I plan on getting ready this year to make my own queens for 2006, has anyone ever use the Jenter or Nicot systems, I would rather choose one of these two so i dont have to graft. I just would like to hear what you all think so I know witch would be the best for me. has anyone in here tried to raise there own queens smiley
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« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2005, 04:29:37 PM »

With all the talk about possible bee shortage I thought I would resurect this one. Besides the question put forth by TwT I was wondering if there is someplace that explains how to go about doing this.
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« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2005, 01:43:08 AM »

here in forum there is plenty of text about queen rearing. Take search .....
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TwT
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« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2005, 03:14:24 AM »

hey jerry this site has alot of info on queen rearing

http://website.lineone.net/~dave.cushman/breeding.html
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« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2005, 03:36:39 AM »

Quote from: TwT
hey jerry this site has alot of info on queen rearing

http://website.lineone.net/~dave.cushman/breeding.html


AWFULL SITES! Beekeeping book is squeezed in some sencences.

The way "most do so and so" is no value, it  is not value following if you want to be good. Sorry..
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TwT
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« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2005, 04:08:05 AM »

that is just to get a taste finman , we know we need to get some books on queen rearing to learn the tricks of the trade, more than 1 book to, i just ordered a book called  Queen Rearing Honey Bee's by Roger Morse, and im looking at get another by Laid Law (I think thats his name)but thanks for the comment wink
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« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2005, 04:13:23 AM »

How many queens you are going to raise?  - it depends?

Have you good queen from where to take larvas or eggs?
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« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2005, 04:21:26 AM »

If my hive is going to swarm, I change good larvas into queen combs.  This way I get 10-15 queens. I it good number for mating nucs. Then I divice raising hives into those maiting nucs and carry them to 5 km distance.

Next summer I am going to adapt Hopkins mehod  http://www.beesource.com/pov/hayes/abjmay91.htm


30-40 queens are enough

Raising hive must be big, 4 boxes. One box is not enough. Daughters will be small. I have tried many times. Swarming cells is another question.
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« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2005, 04:42:30 AM »

good post finman, what do you do with your queens you raise, use them yourself or sell some, I would like to start raising about 50-100 then maybe later raise more, just have to see how it goes.
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« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2005, 05:27:13 AM »

Quote from: TwT
good post finman, what do you do with your queens .


I change all my productive queens every year. The dead rate in raising process is over 50%.  Somethimes I get nothing from a part. And I discard many after that when I see what kind of bees I got.

If  bees are angry or brood is sporadious, I throw them into bush. Many are gone during mating flight.
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« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2005, 07:54:25 AM »

If one raises queens by the method mentioned in the link offered by Finman
http://www.beesource.com/pov/hayes/abjmay91.htm
How would you then go about making a new colony with some of the new queens?
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« Reply #11 on: January 09, 2005, 11:08:56 AM »

Quote from: Jerrymac
How would you then go about making a new colony with some of the new queens?


Usually I have a langstroth box devided in 4 nucs. One frame brood in each and one food.  It is easier to take them 5 km dintance. If you leave them into same yard, bees return their original hive and you have lost the queen.

Nuc must be stabilized 3 days before you put the queen. There is difficulties to put in the nuc. Losts will happen.

Now I have noticed that easiest way to form new nucs is to divide queen raising hive into small pieces and take them another to the hive yard  to 5 km distance.  If you have in the hive 40 frames you can make 40 mating nucs. and the queen will be nuc's own.  

I have a ponit on a farmer's land which I use as mating yard.

It seems grude but you must get those nuc frames and they have unfriendly bees against new queen.


Also I often take old queen away and I get them a new queen when bees have capped their own queen cells. They gather honey more when they have egg laying brake.

I have bees enough and I may many games with them.  It depends what is going on.

Now I started to use terraium heaters, and it resolved many problems. Usually 2 frame nucs are too cold for brood. But for mating they are good.
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« Reply #12 on: January 09, 2005, 08:06:15 PM »

Are you talking about mating Nucs? If you are I guess I don't understand that process. Where do the drones come from for mating? And if someone has only a few hives, would there be a possibility for too much inbreeding?
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« Reply #13 on: January 09, 2005, 08:17:42 PM »

heres a site with some info on queen rearing

http://www.beeclass.com/DTS/Appliedqueenrearing.htm
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« Reply #14 on: January 09, 2005, 10:13:48 PM »

OK  So the mating nuc isn't where you lock the poor girl in and let the drones have their way with her. She still flies out to mate. Just the name "mating nuc" seemed to be where it takes place.
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« Reply #15 on: January 10, 2005, 01:28:47 AM »

Quote from: Jerrymac
. Where do the drones come from for mating? And if someone has only a few hives, would there be a possibility for too much inbreeding?


In normal hive there are hundreds of drones. They fly in on the sky long disances.

Queen flyes over 5 km to go over distance of its own drones. It try to avoid inbreeding. Queen copulates with 8-16 drones during one or two days. Even rainy day can be between those days. I have seen that.

Even in Finland we have difficulties to find place where is no other beekepers's drones on the sky.  When I go in any direction in my summer place, I will meet other hives at the distance of 10 km.

But that 5 km distance is more theory than true. When I have that mating place and I had big Monticola bee hive there,   most queens mated with it's own yard drones. My friend have 40 italian hives  at the distance of 8 km and I had 10 italian.

Also I have wild dark bees 5 km to north in the tower of shurch. I have not noticed that queen have brought that blood from that direction.

If you use every year same stock, dander of insemination is true.

You can see a little filament in the arse of queen after mating trip. It happens at the hottest point of the day about  14-15 a'clock.

When I walk in the nature I can see few bees in most places. Even honey catching worker can fly 4 km distance and during summer wild swarms can move 5-10 km from starting point.


When we had "dark German race" in Finland 15 years ago, they were quick to copulate with all queens. Now varroa have vanished these totally. - thanks to varroa. It is my friend! Those dark Gemans were worse than varroa!  (killer bees somethimes)
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« Reply #16 on: January 10, 2005, 08:46:17 PM »

At least they were good for something, huh Finman? cheesy
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« Reply #17 on: January 11, 2005, 09:21:37 AM »

I use the Nicot system and here is my method
http://robo.bushkillfarms.com/beekeeping/queen-rearing
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« Reply #18 on: January 11, 2005, 09:32:40 AM »

Happy New Year Robo Smiley
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« Reply #19 on: January 11, 2005, 12:32:47 PM »

You can see a little filament in the arse of queen after mating trip.

OK, I laughed at this. Maybe because a server emergency kept me up all night (ah, the exciting life of a sysadmin!).

Anyway, the books call it "mating sign," which is a pretty mild way of saying the drone's sexual organ and a bit more.
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