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Author Topic: Return supers to the hive for cleaning?  (Read 2152 times)
WLF1961
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« on: July 09, 2008, 09:00:06 PM »

Hello all, it's been a while since I have posted but I try to read every day on here and the info from you experienced bk is priceless and thank you for it. Unless I have missed it, or don't remember, I have not seen a post on supers after you extract them. I was thinking of putting mine back on the hives for a few days to let the bees them dry them up then take them off and do what with them I do't know,lol. What do ya'll do with all your supers for storage till next year? Thanks for any info as this is only my 2nd year and only had 1 last year, but 8 this year. Wayne
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Greg Peck
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« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2008, 09:27:57 PM »

If you are packing them away for the winter, set them out and let the bees clean them up. Then I put each super is a plastic garbage bag and place them in a freezer for several days. Then stack then in a storage room. There is a spray you can use also, certin sp? I use it for brood frames that I store over winter but I dont like the idea of putting it on the super frames even though it says you can.
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"Your fire arms are useless against them" - Chris Farley in Tommy Boy
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annette
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« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2008, 11:15:41 PM »

Place the wet supers above an inner cover and let the bees clean them up. By the next day you take them off and what I do is freeze the frames for a few days, then place them into 2 garbage bags and seal them up really good with duct tape. I purchased these very large plastic containers from Target and I plan on placing them in the plastic containers after sealing them up in the garbage bags. I don't believe you have to even place them into a container after the garbage bags, but I just want to make sure they will be ok.

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golddust-twins
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« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2008, 02:36:01 AM »

Annette is right it works like a charm.


                                          Corinne
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SgtMaj
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« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2008, 04:28:29 AM »

I think I remember reading somewhere that feeding honey back to hives can be a good way to spread AFB if you mix up which hives get the supers and give them back to different hives.  I can't remember where I read that though, so I might have that totally wrong.
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deejaycee
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« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2008, 05:40:23 PM »

No, you're right SgtMaj, but hopefully if you have AFB you are aware of it and are taking precautionary measures.   The issue is therefore more about feeding honey from other 'unknown' sources back to bees - aside from the economics, it's the reason that we buy and feed sugar syrup instead of buying and feeding honey from other sources.

(Our precautionary measures here in New Zealand, btw, are killing the hive and burning and burying all components of the hive - we have a complete eradication policy)

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johnnybigfish
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« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2008, 07:51:58 PM »

 Hey Annette!
Why do you freeze them? cant you just put them away like they are?
This is the first year for me also where I'm gonna have to store some boxes and frames Smiley

your friend,
john
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annette
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« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2008, 08:11:52 PM »

Hey Annette!
Why do you freeze them? cant you just put them away like they are?
This is the first year for me also where I'm gonna have to store some boxes and frames Smiley

your friend,
john

I freeze them for a few days to kill off any wax moth larvae that may be lurking in the cells and maybe any other insects that may be born once away from the hive. Once they are frozen, then there are no worries about any infestations in the wax combs when they are stored.
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WLF1961
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« Reply #8 on: July 13, 2008, 11:32:34 AM »

Thanks for the replies. But what do people do that have 40, 50 or more hives for honey? Thats an awful lot of boxes. Thanks
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jason58104
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« Reply #9 on: July 13, 2008, 12:01:27 PM »

Here in the frozen tundra I let mother nature kill the wax moths for me.  I put all the supers and extrator out in the middle of my yard and let the girls clean them up, then I store all of my dry supers in my unheated machine shed.  No problems so far
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Greg Peck
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« Reply #10 on: July 13, 2008, 07:10:26 PM »

There are other chemicals which can be used to store stacks of boxes. I forget the names right now but the bee-supply places sell them. I think you put a set amount of chemical in each stack and it keeps the moths out.
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"Your fire arms are useless against them" - Chris Farley in Tommy Boy
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annette
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« Reply #11 on: July 13, 2008, 09:44:45 PM »

There are other chemicals which can be used to store stacks of boxes. I forget the names right now but the bee-supply places sell them. I think you put a set amount of chemical in each stack and it keeps the moths out.

I have just learned of this product called Certan which is used to store supers and keep away any infestations. I plan on purchasing some soon.

Annette
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DBoire
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« Reply #12 on: July 14, 2008, 09:07:29 AM »

I like Annette's system,  I'll add the freezing this year.  I believe that the wax moths are actually looking for pollen, not honey. Either way I will freeze the mediums before I store them.

thanks Annette cheesy

db
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JP
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« Reply #13 on: July 14, 2008, 09:32:46 AM »

There are other chemicals which can be used to store stacks of boxes. I forget the names right now but the bee-supply places sell them. I think you put a set amount of chemical in each stack and it keeps the moths out.

I have just learned of this product called Certan which is used to store supers and keep away any infestations. I plan on purchasing some soon.

Annette

If you use Certan you don't have to freeze them. WLF1961, you mix it 19 parts water to one part Certan and put in a spray bottle or small pump sprayer and apply, doesn't hurt bees or honey.




...JP
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WLF1961
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« Reply #14 on: July 15, 2008, 12:18:55 AM »

OK, thanks JP. I used the freezing method last year also but only had 1 hive. This year I have 8 and was just wondering what others do cause if you had 20 - 50 hives or more the freezing is just not an option in my opinion. Thanks all for your replies. Wayne
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SgtMaj
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« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2008, 05:17:48 AM »

You can still freeze them, even if you have a large number, you just have to do it one at a time (or possibly several at a time if you have a large empty chest style freezer), then just bag them and store them at normal temp. wherever you've got room.
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