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Author Topic: When do I begin??  (Read 4353 times)
kevin
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« on: July 03, 2008, 08:54:20 AM »

Total Newbee here in Versailles, KY  but have quickly discovered there is a whole lot of beekeeping in the Bluegrass.  Going to the local association mtg on Tuesday and will join the state association.  We also have a Dadant branch in Frankfort . . .  I had no idea!

I am thinking I should read my "dummies" book and purchase one of the starter kits (Brushy Mnt. i think) and order some bees in Feb. and then hit the ground running (working with bees not from bees) and hopefully be enjoying some honey next year.  I have two black locust trees and the neighbor has fruit trees so I wish I had thought of this years ago.

Thanks for the site
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Keith13
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« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2008, 08:58:56 AM »

Watch buying some of the starter kits I did that and ended up with a bunch of stuff I don't use
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DaveKow
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« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2008, 09:18:33 AM »

Watch buying some of the starter kits I did that and ended up with a bunch of stuff I don't use

I agree.  Read, read, read before you buy equipment.

"Dummies" is the book that got me hooked.  Which was right around this time last year.  I have read a lot since then and still don't know what's going on.  Lucky forum members are always here to assist.  Kinda like "bee" tech. support.

Good luck!

Dave
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Ross
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« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2008, 09:19:16 AM »

Best place to start (other than a mentor) is http://www.bushfarms.com/beesnewbees.htm
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Those who don't read good books have no advantage over those who can't---Mark Twain
derrick1p1
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« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2008, 10:18:21 AM »

Yes, read read read.  Don't buy a starter kit.  Reading (and certainly checking out www.bushfarms.com) will give you a better idea of what you actually do need.  And keep coming back here.  You'll learn so so much by reading posts and visiting the archives. 

Best of luck, and Welcome!
Derrick
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I won't let grass grow under my feet, there will be plenty of time to push up daisies.
kathyp
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« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2008, 10:25:21 AM »

agreed.  no starter kit.  the things you  need to start are really basic.  use the money to buy extra supers so you'll be prepared for expansion or swarm catching  smiley  when you are ready to buy, post here.  you will get many good suggestions.  you can take what looks like it will work for you.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
tlynn
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« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2008, 12:30:39 PM »

From another new-bee...evaluate your hive location before you place them.  We don't have a very large back yard and I wanted to give them as much space between them and our walkways as possible so I located my first hive at the edge of a grapefruit tree.  Course I didn't really consider the 2 pound bombs that would later drop on the hive and also learned from local beekeepers that hive beetles like shade a lot more than sun.  So I had to move the hive south a couple feet away from the branches and into the sun.  Not a big deal but if I realized I needed to set it on the opposite side of the yard I would have to do it in 3 foot increments due to the bees' little gps that would keep bringing them back to empty space if I just up and moved it more than 3 feet.  Also I faced them southeasterly with a view of sky over our house which I guess has helped them to choose a flight path up and over our house instead of over our fence to the west and across the neighbor's back yard.  I don't really know how much you can influence their flight path but at least in our case being in a residential neighborhood it worked out well.  I'd rather them do cleansing flights over us than our neighbor's pool.

Tracy
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Robo
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« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2008, 05:02:40 PM »

Don't wait until February to order your bees.  Order them as soon as your supplier will take orders for next year.
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johnnybigfish
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« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2008, 06:34:12 PM »

 Hey Kevin!
I really like the dummy book! As a matter of fact, Its a good book to help you understand what all the other books are telling you!
 Ive said the same thing about wishing i has started this years ago. I feel that beekeeping is a hobby that you really have to have patience with. patience you dont get until you start getting older,..At least this pertains to my case. I'm ate up with this beekeeping stuff!
 I'm thinking about how youre going to bee thinking bees so hard till you get them, and thats when page 2 goes into your bee book. Getting bees, especially for people who decide to start before its easier to get bees, is something you HAVE TO wait for, usually...Its not like just pulling out a credit card and getting that new set of speakers, or going out and buying a car. These kinds of things take just a few minutes anymore.
Waiting for the bees all winter reminds a person that there are things in life you have to wait for.
 ...But the day you finally get your bees and hive them,.......Its like MAGIC!...Kinda like a MIRACLE!!....Its like there IS a Santa!!...At least thats how it made me feel!...And theres the aspect of how you will see all things that you never even thought of taking a second look at, like tiny flowers and other little bugs that you never noticed before! It presents a God experience sort of! You feel more in tune with living things in general!...Funny thing now for me...Every plant I see, I see as bee food now! Thats a trip, eh'?
  I come to this forum Every day after work to see new stuff people put here, you know, questions and answers.....For me, the people here have become a higher priority than most other people in my daily life!
I dont go to the local bee club much but there are occasions where I do call a member from time to time about one thing or another.
I just Luvvvvvvv evrybody here!! grin
Ok,..I better cool it before I start asking everybody here for their addresses so I can mail them Christmas cards!!

Anys, welcome to the forums!
Read lots of bee stuff!
 Watch bee shows on TV!
 Go rent "Ulees Gold"! (Theres bee stuff in the movie, along with a good story)
And, most of all, have fun!

your friend,
john
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annette
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« Reply #9 on: July 03, 2008, 06:42:10 PM »

John

You just have such a wonderful way of expressing yourself. You are right on the money!!! Yes, I also spend so much time just looking around me and noticing nature more. Listening more (especially if I hear a buzz!!) Looking at all the beautiful trees and bushes and flowers and wondering if they are of interest to the bees. Of course, when I do see the bees on the flowers/bushes/trees, etc. well it is like a religious experience and I feel all is well with the world. The little baby girls are happy!!

So Kevin good luck with your new adventure.

Annette from Placerville California where we will be into the 100's once again by the weekend. Yuck!!

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Sean Kelly
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« Reply #10 on: July 03, 2008, 07:30:56 PM »

Did you know that the cover picture on Beekeeping for Dummies was taken by our very own Beemaster?  Yep, it's true!!!

Why wait to get started?!?!?!  Swarms are running rampant right now!  Get a hive, a smoker, a suit, and a hive tool and go catch a swarm!!!  That's all you're getting when you buy a "package" is a ready made swarm.  Just go tell your local fire + police department that you want to be listed as a swarm catcher and the calls will ROLL in!!!

Good luck and welcome to this awesome hobby obsession!!!

Sean Kelly
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"My son,  eat  thou honey,  because it is good;  and the honeycomb,  which is sweet  to thy taste"          - Proverbs 24:13
DaveKow
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« Reply #11 on: July 03, 2008, 08:05:55 PM »

I forgot to mention youtube videos.




And John, amen!

Dave
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derrick1p1
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« Reply #12 on: July 14, 2008, 10:12:09 AM »

johnnybigfish, hit the nail on the head imo.  Seems I look at many things differently now.  I look at people and nature (and how interconnected everything is) differently now as well. 

good luck!
Derrick
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I won't let grass grow under my feet, there will be plenty of time to push up daisies.
rast
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« Reply #13 on: July 14, 2008, 11:25:40 AM »

 Don't make the mistake I made. Be consistant with whatever size box you start with for a number of reasons you learn down the road. I wish I had started with all mediums so I could have swapped brood and egg frames around. Most starter kits come with deeps and they are heavy when full. I would also inquire around about just buying a going hive from someone reputable.
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tadu
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« Reply #14 on: July 14, 2008, 11:28:26 AM »

Hi, read is ok but the best is to find someone close to you and help him for free. Old people needs a young person to carry uppers and talk....
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jojoroxx
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« Reply #15 on: July 14, 2008, 03:57:25 PM »

I too started with the "kits" and am beginning to regret it somewhat.

1.The deep bodies are extrememly heavy

2.The frames come with plastic foundation.

When I learned beekeeping many years ago it was with wax foundation that we wired in. It would sometimes collapsed during extraction...So when the kits came equipped with the plastic foundation I thought maybe it would be better. Then my mentor came to assist me one day and he grunted in disgust when he saw the plastic foundation. His words? "Is the whole da#n world made out of plastic now?"

Also if one wants to use crush and strain for the harvest, they would have to scrape the comb off the foundation. But with wax foundation we can just cut it away and have beautiful comb honey to put in jars whole...(i guess i scrape and strain 4 now... Cry)
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Keith13
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« Reply #16 on: July 14, 2008, 04:55:05 PM »

I too started with the "kits" and am beginning to regret it somewhat.

1.The deep bodies are extremely heavy

2.The frames come with plastic foundation.

When I learned beekeeping many years ago it was with wax foundation that we wired in. It would sometimes collapsed during extraction...So when the kits came equipped with the plastic foundation I thought maybe it would be better. Then my mentor came to assist me one day and he grunted in disgust when he saw the plastic foundation. His words? "Is the whole da#n world made out of plastic now?"

Also if one wants to use crush and strain for the harvest, they would have to scrape the comb off the foundation. But with wax foundation we can just cut it away and have beautiful comb honey to put in jars whole...(i guess i scrape and strain 4 now... Cry)

You are right about heavy. I'm 6'2" 215 and not a whole bunch of fat but the first time I picked up a full deep I thought it was still attached to something those suckers are heavy.

I use plastic and I'm not crazy about it I finally got the girls to draw it out but I had to pretty much dump the wax on em

I sorely wish I had ordered all mediums which I do do now( ha ha I said do do)

my opinion,
Keith
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jason58104
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« Reply #17 on: July 14, 2008, 06:55:50 PM »

Read, read, read,  The Hive And The Honeybee is a good place to start.  Subscribe to the American Bee Journal.  Join your local bee club.  There is so much to learn and so little time.  Enjoy your journey!
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klesage121
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« Reply #18 on: July 15, 2008, 07:46:57 PM »

I was told The Beekeeper's Handbook would tell me everything I would need to know but some of the stuff just goes woosh right over my head so I think as recommended I'll look into getting the dummy book cause right now I sure feel like I fall in that hole.
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #19 on: July 15, 2008, 09:52:32 PM »

I was told The Beekeeper's Handbook would tell me everything I would need to know but some of the stuff just goes woosh right over my head so I think as recommended I'll look into getting the dummy book cause right now I sure feel like I fall in that hole.

There isn't a book about beekeeping in print that will tell you everything.  Something always gets omitted.  In others the author is writing is like his method of beekeeping is the only way.  And almost all of them give bad info about queen excluders, feeding simple syrup, and removing queen cells.  Get 4 beekeeping books, read them all, notice the differences and similarities, then realize that there is even more left unsaid than was said.  But the combination of the 4 books should give you a good start of understanding your ignorance.
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