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Author Topic: Where is the best location for frame of honey to feed Nuc?  (Read 1198 times)
DBoire
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« on: July 02, 2008, 04:00:13 PM »

Where is the best location for frame of honey to feed Nuc?  I originally thought that the best location would be adjacent to the bees/brood, & did so.   After a week, I haven't noticed any colony strength increase.  Undecided 1200 eggs/day X 7 days = more bees, however, todays inspection yielded a egg count of less than 1/3 frame with none on the open frames opposite side of the honey frame.   So I moved the honey frame to #9 position.  Any thoughts?
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qa33010
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« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2008, 10:51:12 PM »

   In a nuc position one or five is your best bet as they are the outside two frames.  If there are not enough nurse bees to take care of the brood you will not have immediate results.  The age of the existing bees are also important, as the younger are the better caregivers.  I would keep checking and see if you need to add a frame of capped brood getting ready to emerge, which, of course, you could do now if it is available.  I would put the frame of brood next to your 1/3 frame.  There may be other reasons as well that I can't think of at the moment.  Sorry.

   You did say #9 position.  Was that a typo, or is it a ten frame hive box instead of a five frame nucleus box?
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DBoire
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« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2008, 10:34:43 AM »

Thanks for the thoughts,.. I should have clarified,  I have moved a 4 frame Nuc into a 10 frame box that I use 9 frames in.  So in summary , 4 frames moved into 9 frame box.  I had originally placed the honey frame adjacent to the brood but the queen didn't seem to be crossing it to lay in the 4 frames on the opposite side( I waited about 7 days).  I moved the honey super to a location one off from the box wall opposite the brood, the #9 position, or if you will for a 9 frame box, the #8 position.
Hope this makes more sense.
D
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2008, 10:54:55 AM »

If you have a ten frame box you better put in ten frames or you will have a mess. The queen would not cross the honey frame probably thinking it is the end of the hive, and besides laying on the other side would split up the brood nest. Not something the bees like to do.
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« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2008, 12:58:34 PM »

If you have all drawn comb, then yes, put the frame of honey on the outside.  However, at this point in time they should be taking advantage of the honeyflow and may not be using the frame of honey.  Regardless, if they need it it is warm enough that they can easily walk over a few frames to get it.  In the fall/winter/spring, then you want it by the brood.
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2008, 04:44:21 PM »

If you have a ten frame box you better put in ten frames or you will have a mess. The queen would not cross the honey frame probably thinking it is the end of the hive, and besides laying on the other side would split up the brood nest. Not something the bees like to do.

Nine frames are meant to be used in harvestable honey supers only.  Using them in the brood chamber will result it a lot of bridge and burr comb that the queen will likely also use as brood comb. IMO, the person who came up with the idea of 9 frame super did a big disservice to beekeepers as the technique is more often misunderstood and, hence, wrongly applied (as in your case).  You will actually get more honey by shaving the frame end bars 1/16 inch on each side and placing 11 frames in the box than you will using 9 frames.  It is also easier to handle the frames and manipulate the hive with 10 or 11 rather than 9.

If using 11 frames and foundationless it is also easier to get small cell without regression.  I suggest you vist Micheal Bush's web site and read up on 11 frame vs 9 frame.
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DBoire
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« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2008, 09:47:07 AM »

Thanks for the comments/insights.  My experience is in physics and I find beekeeping is much more variable & the science is elusive.  I've been working at this for only four years & I havee alot to learn.

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« Reply #7 on: July 05, 2008, 11:27:20 AM »

Brian, I can almost cram 9 frms in my 8frm boxes, can I do that for the brood boxes too?  Do they need the extra space on either side that I have now?  It would keep things more even, I won't have to fret that I didn't get them all even on either side..they use the 1 & 8 for storage anyways..  Jody
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #8 on: July 06, 2008, 05:26:36 PM »

Brian, I can almost cram 9 frms in my 8frm boxes, can I do that for the brood boxes too?  Do they need the extra space on either side that I have now?  It would keep things more even, I won't have to fret that I didn't get them all even on either side..they use the 1 & 8 for storage anyways..  Jody

Micheal Bush shaves the end bars and puts 9 frames in his brood boxes.  Is that a good enough recommendation? 

The only problem I see with 9 frames in an 8 frame box is rolling the bees during inspection which can be relieved by removing the 3rd frame instead of the 1st.  I've always removed the 3rd frame--it gets me to the heart of the brood box faster and gives me more manipulation room for the remaining frames.  Slide the 1st and 2nd frame to the wall, pry the 3rd frame away from the 4th frame and lift it out, then leave it out during inspection and replace when finished.  If all frames are replaced as they are inspected, except for the removed frame, work is quick and accurate and buttoning up is just a matter of putting the 3rd frame back and snug up the frames.
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