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Author Topic: Wild colonies  (Read 1729 times)
Finman
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« on: December 28, 2004, 03:03:51 AM »

I read that mites destroyed 90% wild honey bee colonies from USA ten years ago.

That happened in Finland to our "native" honey bees at the end of 20 years ago. They were difficult to handle and to give medicin.  Now it is easy to keep bees because those wild creatures are not mixing my "noble bee blood".

I know one wild bee colony inside the house wall and it has been there at least  6 years.

A friend told me that near that place is one colony in the tower of shurch. It has been there at least 20 years, he says.  

How these colonies manage with brood deseases and with mites, that is the mystery.  Colony seems to be Crainian.
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Anonymous
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« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2004, 06:46:40 AM »

Interesting point Finman.  Swarms often replace dead colonies without anyone knowing the difference.  The small cell proponents claim that feral bees, because of the natural small cell comb they build, reach equilibrium with the mites.  Study reveals that in nature, bees build lots of different sized comb, so I'm not sure small cell is truly the answer.  Maybe a combination of natural sized comb, hygenic, mixed with defensive behaviour.  Maybe it's all natural selection, and what's left in nature is truly resistant stock?
I was recently invited to remove a wild colony that had been in place for at least 4 years.  A racoon ripped the top off and destroyed the colony before I had a chance to get them.  Very dissappointing.  The bees that I found appeared very dark, and very small.  hmmmmm.  I wonder what that indicated?
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Finman
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« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2004, 07:41:11 AM »

Quote from: Anonymous
Study reveals that in nature, bees build lots of different sized comb, so I'm not sure small cell is truly the answer.


Bees and mites are millions of years old. How could they vanish from globe so easily, .........with smaller combs or with another natural way?

"It is lucky to live in Hope", said tapeworm.  wink
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Anonymous
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« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2004, 03:20:15 PM »

I had read that you must replace your brood comb every so many years because each time a bee hatches out the cell gets smaller. If that is true then it makes sense that cells for wild bees come in all different sizes. the cell size would depend on how old the comb is.
Since I had bees living in a couple of bee trees on my property for at least 3 years, I do believe in small cell size brood comb.
Cheesy Al
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Finman
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« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2004, 03:49:43 PM »

Quote from: trail twister
I had read that you must replace your brood comb every so many years because each time a bee hatches out the cell gets smaller.


It takes 3 years to get brood cells so old that light does not see through.
In southern climate brood generations are more, and combs get older and smaller  faster.

Quote
If that is true then it makes sense that cells for wild bees come in all different sizes.


I have seen old combs and little bees.  BUT When combs get too old, bees bite combs in pieces and carry rubbish outside. They build new combs.

But you really realise, that if to get rid off mites is so easy, why mites are still in colonies?

I may say superstition, but it it is better to keep mouth shut  wink

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Anonymous
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« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2004, 04:28:58 PM »

put your teeth back in finman.  I don't think cell size is the be all answer, but if putting them on small cell helps by shortening capping and pupation times, interfering with the mite's life cycle, why not give it a shot.  Obviously, we arent going to erradicate the mites, but if we can get the bees to keep them in check, then we can mop up the isolated mite positions and declare the war over.  Then we can start winning the peace.. bahahahahah... sorry... sometimes when I take off the aluminum foil hat.............
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