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Author Topic: D8 and my youngest gal  (Read 3255 times)
Cindi
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« on: June 19, 2008, 09:09:58 AM »

Well, my Daughter has finally got her way.  Her horse her Sister gave her has come home.  Eeeks!!!  Its been years since we have had horses, and we have kept them almost all of my life.  My Daughters both had horses as they grew up, eventing these in their Prince Phillips Games, Pony Club, trail riding, you name it, these gals of mine have done it (with their Mother and Father in tow).  Oh those early mornings, getting the horses ready to go to the games and events, the dreary, rainy days, the sunny days.  The things we do as parents to support our children.  The girls grew up, the interest in their horses lessened with the years, then parents finally took over the sole duties of looking after the horses.  The time came when I decided that I not longer wanted to go out in the winter, pack in hundreds of bales of hay, clean stalls, the farrier and vet bill costs.  Nope, not doing it any more.  The horses were eventually all sold.

I have missed having the horses, the sound of their crunching and chomping on food.  The scent of their breath and bodies, the scents of the stable.  But that was never enough to get me back into "horses".

A couple of months ago my oldest gal gave her Sister a horse.  She had too many and decided that her little Sister should have a horse again, a beauty of a Quarterhorse mare, and the personality that goes along with it, lovely.  D8, sounds like a tractor, right, well, she loves to push on stuff, and that be mostly humans, when she wants that face rub.  She loves her forehead to be scratched, just a little quirk I guess. 

My youngest gal has kept the horse elsewhere.  I know that she longed to bring it home.  But every day morning and night she would tend to the horse, letting it in and out of the barn, running electric fencing to keep her safe.

The summertime has come.  OUr property out the back has grown some beautiful grasses.  We had it cleared two years ago, all the deciduous trees removed, leaving behind beautiful groves of conifers.  I have seen her looking out the back, that yearning and longing in her eyes.  My eyes have done that yearning and long too.  The day came that she asked if she could bring the horse "home".

Oh how can a parent resist those beautiful eyes of their children.  When they look up at you for approval, for desire of the parents to show them they love them, this can come in many forms......children have that way, they have that way of wrapping you around their finger.  It does not matter their age, they have that power, that spell that I speak of, as with the honeybee.  As parents, we are all held under the spell of our children.  Oh, they do have their ways.

My Daughter told me that I would never have to look after her horse, nor clean the stall, nor pack hay.  I believe her....and I trust her world.  She has grown up to be a beautiful woman.....that childhood irresponsibility is gone.   And yes, the horse came home.

She worked hard.  We put in 70 fence posts to be the guide for the electric fencing that she herself strung.  We had the use of her Husband's Brother, who brought a machine and pounded the fence posts in.  He just pushed the posts with the top of the bucket of his machine and they went in like nothing on this earth.  The soil is very soft and moist because of all the rain, that assisted with setting the posts too.  We have a fence post pounder, but let me tell you that is a hard work.  It has a handle on each side, a metal tube that fits over the end of the post, and it is a two person job to easily set a pole.  It weighs I would guess about 80 pounds.  To have pounded in those 70 poles with this apparatus would have taken a couple of days.  I take my hat off to my Son-in-Law's Brother, he is a good man, he treats us well.

The electric fence was strung, and all the other stuff that goes with setting up electric fence, my Daughter did it all, along with a little help from her Father to get the electrical part complete.  I take my hat off to her too.

So, D8 is home, we sit and watch her, she loves people and all the things that go on around our farm.  On the south bordering property is sheep, goats, a black llama, named Arthur, two horses and chicken yard fowl, on the northern neighbour property is two other horses.  She has the time of her life, watching, listening and having a great time.  What she is not too good with is Richard.  Richard nowadays stays most puffed up and he looks rather big.  He is protecting all his babies and is doing such a fine job.  When this mare sees the turkey, all puffed up, she is in bewilderment!!!  She is kind of scared, but at the same time, kind of curious.  In the picture you will see my Daughter on the horse, what the horse is gawking at so hard is Richard, all puffed up, and also him wondering what on earth kind of alien being has come to his property.  It is a hoot and a hollar.

I am pleased.  I love to have a horse here, it has enhanced my experiences out of doors even more than how cool they already are.  I can see soon another one coming, how could my Daughter ride alone?  Hee, hee, oh, to get on the back of a horse again.  My preference is to ride bareback, that I would do, a saddle is OK too, but the communion with a horse without a saddle is a wonderful thing, even on those winter days, one is kept warm.  Kathy and Jody you both will know what I mean.  I remember you, Jody, speaking of when you would lay on your mare, as she grazed on the grass.....

Have the most wonderful and beautiful day, lovin' and groovin' on our great lives.  Cindi









The finishing touches on the fence, after returning from a bareback ride, you can see that by the horse dust on her pants!!!

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« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2008, 09:57:31 AM »

Beautiful mare, Cindi.
We still have 2 horses, although I think I would happy to give them away, as health problems and a lack of hay to be found last year and maybe this year, have been something to work through.
We ended up feeding an alfalfa cube, sweet feed, and extruded pellet mix last winter. It cost a small fortune. So far, no hay has been in paper this year either.
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« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2008, 10:03:43 AM »

Double Bee, thank you.  We had a mare many years ago that we had to feed extruded pellets to.  She was a horrible keeper, a thoroughbred to be more exact.  I have been thinking of the alfalfa cube, my oldest Daughter swears by it, and it takes up so little space.  We have no shortage of hays around here, I think it is our moist climate, it makes the grassy stuff grow like wildfire.  I hope things work out that you can get food for the beasts more easily.  Beautiful and most wonderful day, love our lives we live and share.  Cindi
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« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2008, 10:07:09 AM »

Beautiful mare.  Great post.  And, here I thought I was going to read about your daughter on a runaway piece of heavy equipment.  grin
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Lawrence Underwood

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« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2008, 10:37:23 AM »

What does it cost to keep a horse?  I was thinking of getting one.  We have plenty of room on the farm and food available since we have cattle and other horses, but that's all my wife's grandparent's property.  They wouldn't have an issue with me keeping the horse on their property but I don't want them to be burdened by having to provide food for it or take care of it in any way.  I would want to pay them for the feed. Are vet bills high?
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« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2008, 10:22:10 AM »

Bassman1977.  I honestly don't know what the cost would be in these days.  I remember when we had horses, I would say about 7 years ago, I figured that it would be about $50 per horse, that would be hay, grain, etc., etc.  I am sure that it may be different now.  But if there is pasture, there is no need to hay in the summertime and I guess it would depend on the cost of the bale of hay, etc.  I think my Daughter told me the other day that D8 consumes about 1 bay of hay a week, now maybe a bale of hay might be $6 or so, I didn't ask her.

About the vet bills.  That would depend on the health of the beast, generally, I am thinking that horses are pretty healthy.  They should have their hooves trimmed every couple of months though, I know that the farrier charges $30 here for the trimming.  Now putting on shoes, no clue the amount, I do know when we kept horses, it was about $100, no clue if the prices have gone up.

Jody has had a horse, she may be able to answer your questions.  KathyP has horses, maybe she will chime in......think about getting a horse, they are a work and a wonder, and oh they smell so good.....I am not kidding....the scent of the horse is something that is special and no other odour is the same, especially when the horse's body is very warm, like after a ride...beautiful day in this great life, have this day as a special day, love our earth.  Cindi
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« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2008, 11:51:26 AM »

Wow, I could've had a D8!!!

Beautiful horse Cindi, mare, whatever you call it, that sucker looks huge!


...JP
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« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2008, 12:36:06 PM »

Thanks for the info Cindi.  That's a lot less than I have thought.  I will be able to get food for the horse at cost from the farm (like I said I don't want to mooch off my wife's grandfather and uncle who do most of the work on the farm).  Now, what type of horse should I get...  I like the horses that Mr. Bush has.  They are something else.  Maybe a Clydesdale...  grin I've always liked those.  Eh...plenty of time to think about it.
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« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2008, 11:37:40 PM »

Cindi, both are beautiful.  I do so miss my Haley.  Not the work but the smell, feel & companionship.  They are such characters.  Has D8 done the "orca" snort & thunder around yet? I love that.  Haley would do the Morgan trot that she would never do for me!  Do you guys have to vaccinate for West Nile there?  Bassman, I'd say its bout 75 a month here for hay & grain.  Grass hay is cheaper but there isn't any selenium in the ground & there aren't any nutrients in it after about4 months so you have to substitute w orchard or timothy or add some alfalfa.  Hay is like gas now for pricing, $10-13 a bale shocked  They usually go thru 1 a week.  Haley was on old fart food, palletized w everything she needed cause she couldn't chew her hay anymore, just left green goober blobs.. tongue  (even after floating her teeth)  She didn't have many molars left in back.I still gave her timothy for something to do, they need to chew.  Shoes were $75 every 6-8 weeks, trims $30  Shots are about $30, for equine influenza, tetanus & some other things, west Nile $35, worming every 8 weeks, $6-20 depending on what you use or got on sale. ( I always stocked up on specials, grand openings, customer appreciation days...)Then there are the treats...although Haley would eat most anything, even hamburgers, spaghetti,fried chix, chili,dog biscuts...she loved my homemade pina coladas & cranberry salad!  I am partial to Morgans, not the park horse show type, the old Justin Morgan ones.  Haley was one of those, treetrunks for legs, great hooves.  They have a little smoother gait, not the jarring you get on some horses. I could drink a pop while jogging or cantering she was so smooth.  Trot was smooth too..for trot!  Frisians are cool looking...Clydesdale's would break your bankbook w/shoes, a good $200 a pop.  They tend to not have good feet (always exceptions, just as a general rule) so you HAVE to keep shoes on em, there's a lot of weight on the front feet, bout 60%!Geezzzz, looks like a book here!!  Can't wait for more pics & stories!  Jody
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« Reply #9 on: June 22, 2008, 01:11:16 AM »

Great story Cindi, Great thread as a matter of fact. It is funny the things in our lives that were so much work but brought us so much joy in the process. I never did own horses or work around them much. I worked a neighbors dairy farm growing up, hauling hay, changing sprinkers etc. I could not wait until the day I got to leave the area and get away from what I thought was the dumbest animal that God ever created. (Dairy Cows). However, there is always a however!! On a recent trip to one of the few still operating dairy farms in the area with my younger brother and about 20 of my scouts, my brother and I both had to admit that we would give all we had right now to be able to raise our kids and such on a good old dairy farm. I know that it sounds cliche, but I will never forget asking the owner of the dairy farm why he would ever have chosen to raise the dumbest animal that God ever created, his response was "I am not raising cows, I am raising kids"
I think that it took me about 20 years to figure out what he meant. Now with my 13 yr old daughter, 9 yr old son, and 4 yr old daughter, I think that I understand.
Cindi, it does my heart well to hear you talk of your children. They are lucky to have a mother like you to continue to play a part in their lives. Don't believe for a second, that they don't love the part you play. whether they ever admit it or not.
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« Reply #10 on: June 23, 2008, 09:18:26 AM »

Frantz, thank you for those kinds words.  Yes, my children are the most precious things that I could ever have, imagine.

Jody, yes, it is nice to converse with someone who has kept horses here.  I love the Morgan breed.  They are a beautiful one for surely.  My youngest Daughter's horse was a Morgan, he was a beauty of a dude, but very spirited.  It was a shame when she no longer was interested and wanted to sell him so she could buy a car, that she did.  I regret this to this day, but oh well, there should be no regrets, just lessons learned.  In those days, we could not have afforded to keep her horse and help to pay for a car too, so a hard choice had to be made.  His name was Beau.

We had that ding dang Thoroughbred horse of my oldest gal that had to be fed extruded food.  Her teeth were even floated too, but she still had to have the extruded food to keep weight on her body.  And oh, her feet!!!  Nasty.  Thoroughbreds have a place in this world, but not on a farm where they are used for trail riding, they are good for flat work only, in my eyes.

I think that I posted that D8 is 14.1 h.h.  My Daughter was telling me last night that she is 14.3 h.h.  That seems a little more logical, for a Quarterhorse.  We have been talking about getting another "pony" for the kids here, hee, hee.  I told her no ponies, I could ride one quite comfortably that is no less than 14 h.h. at the shortest.  Kids grow so fast, the point of getting a too small horse doesn't work.

My oldest gal is getting front shoes on D8 on Thursday, that bill is going to be $100.  Holy smokers!!!  Prices have gone up, we used to get 4 shoes for that price.  D8 came from a place where the weather is very dry, she did not need shoes there.  In the Lower Mainland we are the rainforest.  When she was riding the other day, D8 had a bit of tender front feet, her feet must have softened up with the humidity, so now she needs fronts.  That will be every 6 weeks, like you were saying Jody.  Oh brother......the bills are now mounting.....thank goodness she is taking every bit of responsibility on her own.

EXCEPT....now my bee house is going to be turned back into a box stall.  Eeeks!!!!  Just when I thought it was clear to come out of the water.  My bee barn is set up so beautifully.  Now it will be turned back into a box stall.  Oh well, the things that we do for our kids (and still do, for gracious sakes, she is 33 years old!!!!).  My Husband is going to build on an addition to the side of the existing box stall, my bee stuff will move over there.  In reality, I don't need such a big room for my bee stuff, it is just so nice and clean and white.  Now it will be all brown from the bottom to the top.  Horses have a way of flinging dung all over, hee, hee.  Thank goodness I love this young lady, or else I would tell her to hit the road and find another box stall to put her horse in.  And we thought that we were done with construction out there. 

This will be funnnnneee to have the turkeys in the next box stall over to D8.  She is still freaked out at Richard when he sees him puff up and make that whomping sound as he is doing it.  And he is mostly all puffed up because he is the protector of the turkey hens and their babies.  Oh he is a wonderful dad, he just puffs, whomps, follows them around everywhere, and watches with his watchful eye.  And he has beautiful eyes.  I love them.  They look black, and the contrast of the beautiful red on his head most of the time and the other colours that are on his head and waddle (like from a pale creamy colour, to different shades of blue, to completely fire engine red in a few moments, still blows me away).  Richard still loves me, and hangs out with me a little bit too, when he can tear himself away from all his children that always get into so much trouble, hee, hee.

Jody, how old was Haley?  I don't think you ever said.  Can you yet talk about what happened to her?  I would imagine, just old age.  I bet she was a beauty.  Oh, I know I am ramblin', but a'ramblin' I must go.  Most beautiful day, love our days we live, livin' them like there was no tomorrow.  Cindi
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« Reply #11 on: June 23, 2008, 12:18:24 PM »

Cindi  Turkeys are so cool!  We had 2 that Amanda's dad was going to eat for Thanksgiving & Christmas.  Well, they followed him everywhere & sat in his lap. They sure knew who to suck up to! ( I could never whack em..) He loved those turkeys but a raccoon or something got them so bad I couldn't save em.  The neighbors had 2 also, 1 Tom.  He was so fun to watch, the strutting, colors changing.  Amanda got really good at the Ouk Ouk noise they make & they would come running, Ouking back.  She still does it at any turkeys she sees to get em riled up!  I fostered a rescue a few years back..he was GINORMOUS!! shocked No idea how old he was but was so impressive & got along w/goat & horse fine. Children are truly Gods blessing to us. I am so honored that he trusts in me to be the caretaker!  Amanda & Chels are my greatest joy & achievement.  It is interesting when they are adults, still your child but not, you know?  I love seeing the family traits continuing hopefully to the grandchildren..someday! Haley was between, 30-35 Vets guess. She died from colic, that was age related I'm sure.  She only had 3 bouts in the 18 years I had her, always remedied w/the walking, pain meds, oil, never lasting more than a few hours  This last year she had 3-4, taking longer & longer to remedy  This time when I got up to feed she had been running/rolling already, who knows how long, sweaty, heavy breathing, shaking, mud on face, blanket, she was in great pain.  I did the usual, pain meds, walking, brushing as it relaxes her.  No change by 9am so called vet.  Got heavy duty shot, did more walking.  It relaxed her a bit but was still having the rounds, I'm imagining like labor pains, like waves.  By 2 she was worse, he said to lunge her a bit faster than walking.  She wouldn't move any faster & wouldn't drink any water the whole time, she would put her face in & splash but not drink.  I even tried molasses in warm water.  By 4pm I called the vet back & he came out around 5.  Did the oil, super pain meds. asked if I was going to do surgery, I said no cause of her age & finances.  By 7pm she still hadn't "gone" 9pm more pain meds, still walking her.  Went to bed, when I got up at first light she was down & I knew she was almost gone.  Considered calling the vet but she didn't have much time, nothing was going to help, you know that we know when they are "over the edge". I didn't want her to be alone when she died so sat in the rain, keeping it out of her eyes, stroking & talking w her, remembering all the things we had done together. I don't know if she really knew I was there.  Her ears did move, she did seem to relax, I like to think she was reassured @ not having to die alone. She gave a couple of louder gurgling sighs & was gone.  It's weird, once she was dead, she looked so small.  She was a big lady, 15.2hh Solidly built w a HUGE ego & personality but w/the life out, she was small.  I think that she had twisted her gut sometime before I had gotten out the night before w/her rolling & flopping down. Geezzz, now I'm bawling again..thought I was past it! Anyways, then was the age old problem...what to do w/1200lbs of dead horse..they aren't like a goldfish, hamster or parakeet!  I really didn't want to call the renderer's, they have no respect for the animal & was gonna cost $150.  We rented a small backhoe for 1/2 day, $250.  Thank goodness she died in the middle of the sandy part of the pasture next to but not on where I buried the goats.  Bruce asked if I wanted to say something but I had said all I needed to while she was dying & was in "get er done" mode before the neighbor girl got home from school.  It was an awful day, but as we were pushing her in the hole, through my tears I heard bald eagles, then saw a pair flying over the pasture & the sun came out.  Then heard barn/tree swallows in the sky above me, one of my favorite signs of spring, their chittery squeaks making me smile.  The smell of the fresh "alive" after winter dirt was very calming..weird huh?  Shortly after Haley went I got my chix & bees, get much joy getting to know em & watching the antics..well bees don't have antics but as you know, are very interesting & entertaining in their own way!  I don't know if I will get another horse, her personality was so great, she was an ornery old bat, we were much as an old married couple, she knew what she could get away with, I knew how much I could, not that both of us didn't try pushing the line just to see.  She was so used to my antics that when I got the bee suit & lumbered out of the house waving my arms growling like JP's avatar she didn't even flinch...Very disappointing, I was hoping for the orca snort, stompling, flaring of nostrils or the poufty tail (like D8's w Richard)..nada, nothing just looked @ me with the patient look, you know, the one you get w/your kids or husband when you come running in the house with "an idea rolleyes" It's going to be a beautiful day here in the PNW so out to play in the dirt!  Jody
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« Reply #12 on: June 24, 2008, 09:03:26 AM »

God Bless you Jody, You and Cindi are the type of mothers that this world needs more off. Not just mothers of children, but mothers of the earth and all things in it. True stewards of the blessings that God gives us for the short time we are here.
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« Reply #13 on: June 24, 2008, 02:04:57 PM »

Frantz, peace, you are a fine soul.

Jody, you are such an excellent writer.  I read your story and you made me bawl.  You took me right there to that time in your life where you had to say goodbye to your mare of so many years, 18, that is a bond that must have been very, very strong.

Colic is a nasty.  I have had several experiences with my horses and colic, and I know the hours spent on those dark and rainy winter nights, walking the horse.  It always seemed to happen in the dead of the winter.  My Sister lost a mare to the colic last year.  Yes.  The hole in the ground is enormous that must be dug.  They dug it by hand.

When I was a young girl, (now, when was that anyways).  I had a gelding, his name was Jack.  I was still living under my Parents' roof.  I was 17.  One night I was in a hurry to go out and "play" with my friends.  I had given Jack some beet pulp and did not put water in it to soften it first.  Bad girl.  My friends were awaiting me and I just didn't take the time.  That was a lesson learned that I will never repeat, nor forget.

Jack got very sick and by the time I had come home, probably around 10:00 PM or something, my Mother told me he was very sick.  To make a long story short, the beet pulp had lodged in his throat.  We had a vet that lived in our area, he was not very good at things.  I know that.  But he was better than nothing.  He came and gave this poor gelding a shot to try to dislodge the beet pulp.  These memories are rather foggy, probably repressed memories or something like that.  The beet pulp never did dislodge.  I walked this horse all night, long into the morning and it never cleared.  We called the vet back and he said there was no hope for him.  Maybe in these days, something could have been done, but we are talking almost 40 years ago, medicine has changed so much. 

The vet told us that the horse MUST be put down, oh this poor young girl, I feel sorry for myself, I did a wrong thing, but didn't deserve my ol' steed to die.  The horse had to be euthinazed (spelling).  The vet did not have capacity for this deed.  We phoned the local police and the officer, (I still remember his name) came out and shot the horse.  Dead.

Now, we had that carcass.  Someone came a dug a hole with a machine and then left.  My Brother and Father tried to put the horse in the hole.  Be ding danged, if that horse would not fit!!!  OMG.......they had to cut off Jack's legs.  I still remember clearly the horror and the sound of this sawing of poor Jack's legs right off.  He then fit into the hole.  I was not present then....I had gone to the house, crying and bawling my eyes out.  A terrible thing happened that day, and it was all my fault.

I never did get another horse.  My Sister kept hers and she took good care of it.  When my two girls became a little bit older, each of them got their own horses.....and then the fun began.  I could let go the pain of that terrible day in my life, that it took many, many years.  It still brings sadness when I think of Jack.  My buddy, my pal.  Jody, I know your pain.  It will take a lifetime for you to get over it, and you probably never will fully get over it, but keep on smilin', girl.  AND....have a beautiful and most wonderful day, lovin' and livin' this wonderful life you live.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #14 on: June 25, 2008, 03:36:19 PM »

We've been pounding posts all spring here as well. Now that my daughter's mare, Mexi, has some good grass, I'm also thinking she needs some company. I need a big gelding that I can ride.
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« Reply #15 on: June 25, 2008, 04:26:29 PM »

Cindi, we are having a bawlfest!  Reading your post made me start all over again.  What a lesson learned for you, doubly as hard as I know you have the love, respect & caretaker personality even so young. Did see some humor with the legs deal, sounds exactly like something that would happen in our family!  We did have to "maneuver" Haley w the bucket on the backhoe..she was too heavy for the poor thing to lift & the back end came up..I had a flash of "OH MY, NOT BRUCE TOO!!  JUST GOT HIM FIXED!!"  I thought the teeth dealies were going to pop her or something...thankfully nothing happened & we pushed, shoved from a couple of angles then used the blade to plop her in.  Some archaeologist thousands of years from now is going to have a field day w this yard...all different species in the same places.  We are on an old riverbed so rocks, rocks rocks, just a couple veins of sand so thats where 24 years of pets/barnyard/vermin are!  I can't dig holes w/o disturbing someone & can't remember who is where!  More fun in the sun!  Jody
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