Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
April 20, 2014, 07:19:05 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: wild bees  (Read 3496 times)
bbqbee
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 26


Location: Hamilton, Montana


« on: June 18, 2008, 06:41:16 PM »

howdy... I have not posted in a long while but I do have a question for you all.

2 weeks ago I captured a swarm and they are doing great. my ? is this - I know that the bees came from a large old cottonwood tree that has produced swarms for years. a commercial bkpr always gets the call to get them but they are still in california so she had me go and get them.

#1 the bees are small compared to the kona bees  I have set up next to them
#2 the bees are 50% black the queen is almost all black
#3 they are a little touchy but settling down nicely

My thoughts ...   They have survived a long time in this tree
                       There are few wild bees here in western montana left
                        they are surrounded by commercial bees in the summer
                        they must be mite resistant

what do you guys think

I think I would like to raise some queens from them!!!

                       
Logged
Jerrymac
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6047


Location: Wolfforth Texas


« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2008, 07:07:36 PM »

Um... What is the question?

Most long time survivor bees are black and they are smaller because they have not been on artificially larger celled man made foundation/comb. Keep them as close to natural as you can and they will do great without chemicals.
Logged

rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

 Jerry

My pictures.Type in password;  youview
     http://photobucket.com/albums/v225/Jerry-mac/
bbqbee
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 26


Location: Hamilton, Montana


« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2008, 07:16:52 PM »

no real question... just wanted some thoughts - suggestions

thank you
Logged
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6347


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2008, 08:56:10 PM »

I would keep them on natural comb or HSC and not treat them.   I've had good luck with ferals on HSC and no treatment.   If they do well and you like them,  make some queens from her.
Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


Shawn
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1214

Location: Lamar Colorado


« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2008, 12:33:29 PM »

They had natural size comb, small cell. I believe Russians are more black than the Itilians but I only have Itilians.
Logged
doak
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1788

Location: Central Ga. 35 miles north of Macon


« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2008, 06:24:57 PM »

I think the Black German bee run's a little small and on the dark side.
Vader/doak
Logged
qa33010
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 910


Location: Arkansas, White County


« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2008, 12:33:04 AM »

     My ferals are all colors and the queens vary.  I use starter strips only so they can build what they need.  If I get the land I want/need I plan on using ferals for queen production, when I learn how.  I don't treat and if they don't survive, they don't survive.  So far, three years, I have had two hives abscond and two starve with stores they couldn't get to.  I picked up three swarms, one of which didn't make it and a cutout that the land owner wants me to get later this summer, when the aster/goldsenrod blooms.

   Now that I've bragged about the hives I have tongue to your request.  I would definitely look at raising queens from them if they were mine.  The little dinky mean black bees that I haven't seen in numbers for years (small swarm two years ago in backyard but they left).  If you think it's necessary, you can always breed for a more gentle line.  My Russians are normally black and a silver though I do have one that came with a little gold in it and are still that way.  If that tree has never been without a hive in the past IMHO 5 years you definitely have survivor stock to work with.  I would try hard to keep new blood coming in from other survivor or hygenic stock.  That's my opinion, take it for what it's worth. evil cheesy
Logged

Everyone said it couldn't be done. But he with a chuckle replied, "I won't be one to say it is so, until I give it a try."  So he buckled right in with a trace of a grin.  If he had a worry he hid it and he started to sing as he tackled that thing that couldn't be done, and he did it.  (unknown)
SgtMaj
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1464


Location: Corryton, TN


« Reply #7 on: July 24, 2008, 04:13:16 AM »

My only thought is that they aren't mite resistant, but since they are building natural comb which is much smaller than the large commercial size, that gives them enough of an advantage in the struggle against varroa to allow them to live just fine.  Don't know about tracheal mites... they may have simply been lucky there.
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13475


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #8 on: July 24, 2008, 08:16:31 PM »

>what do you guys think

They sound like the typical feral survivors I'm finding.  Small, because of natural cell size, and darker seems to be what is surviving.

>I think I would like to raise some queens from them!!!

I would.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
KONASDAD
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2011


Location: Cherry Hill, N.J.


« Reply #9 on: July 25, 2008, 03:42:28 PM »

my ferals are smaller and darker too. They have mites just like my italians so far. I have maintained small cell and look forward to seeing them survive so i can breed form them. the ferals also fly earlier in the day, in worse weather and are very gentle. they do not make as much honey and collect lots more pollen as well. Just a few observations. They dont propolize as much either so far, but fall is around corner.
Logged

"The more complex the Mind, the Greater the need for the simplicity of Play".
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 14810


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #10 on: July 29, 2008, 04:00:37 PM »

i have wondered if the act of swarming helps control the mites in the hives.  the brood cycle is broken in the swarm, and perhaps in the original hive if all that is left is swarm cells.  i have never seen a report on the idea.
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
KONASDAD
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2011


Location: Cherry Hill, N.J.


« Reply #11 on: July 29, 2008, 04:31:49 PM »

i have wondered if the act of swarming helps control the mites in the hives.  the brood cycle is broken in the swarm, and perhaps in the original hive if all that is left is swarm cells.  i have never seen a report on the idea.
I agree w/ this observation. In both the swarm, and in what remains behind, their brood cycles are broken. Perhaps swarming can be considered a hygenic behaviour too. Undesireable by the beekeeper, maybe helpful to the bees.
Logged

"The more complex the Mind, the Greater the need for the simplicity of Play".
deejaycee
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 110

Location: Hawke's Bay, New Zealand


« Reply #12 on: July 29, 2008, 04:52:51 PM »

i have wondered if the act of swarming helps control the mites in the hives.  the brood cycle is broken in the swarm, and perhaps in the original hive if all that is left is swarm cells.  i have never seen a report on the idea.
I agree w/ this observation. In both the swarm, and in what remains behind, their brood cycles are broken. Perhaps swarming can be considered a hygenic behaviour too. Undesireable by the beekeeper, maybe helpful to the bees.

I also concur.  In fact swarming is a recognised and effective response to high colony mite load in one of the tropical species of bees.. Can't recall if it is apis cerana or apis dorsata though.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.171 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page March 15, 2014, 02:04:08 PM