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Author Topic: Swarm Control Methods  (Read 3840 times)
afar
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Location: Scotland, Uk


« on: December 19, 2004, 04:56:36 PM »

Swarming is big problem of a beekeeper, I use Horsley Swarm control Board, but some beekeepers snelgrove swarm control board, which is a expenssive to build, but Horsley Board easy to operate.
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Finman
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« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2004, 07:23:47 AM »

Quote from: afar
Swarming is big problem of a beekeeper, quote]

It surely is. I cut a wing from queens at spring. I helps that bees cannot escape.
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Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2004, 05:00:04 PM »

I was reading and it says that you can put a special openning on the entrance so only the workers can go but this would have to be removed for spring cleaning of the drones. Bye
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Ryan Horn
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« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2004, 09:39:42 AM »

Quote from: Horns Pure Honey
I was reading and it says that you can put a special openning on the entrance so only the workers can go but this would have to be removed for spring cleaning of the drones. Bye


That is at least 50 year old method.  UH, not working.

The best methods  to manage with swarming

1) Find a stock which is "slow" to swarm.
2) Do not save the queen which is daughter of swarm.
3) Give space at right time

4) If there are capped queen cells, it swarms. Put hive to new place 2 m apart and put a new hive in the old place with foundations. And put into the new hive  queen and that cake on which she is just laying eggs.

Old bees fly to new hive and the rest from colony stay in old hive and keep brood warm. They cannot swarm any more.

The most important thing is that if you not let bees to swarm, queen stops egg laying. So you will not have maximal volume of bees for main blossom.

It important that queen continues egg laying.

When hive is devided, they cannot collect honey. But when honey yield begins, put the old and the new together.  So you have there  a new queen. Kill the old one or do a nuc.

If you have a stock wich is eager to swarm, nothing can save you from disaster and lack of honey.

Beekeepers have many kind of tricks, but this is the clue in swarming.
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Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2004, 06:31:21 PM »

I also saw another idea that is suppose to work but it is very difficult to understand. It talks about swapping things around and making a new hive and in 3 days put the two back together. It also says you can destroy all swarm cells. But all of these methods can fail if the bees make an effort to go. bye
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Ryan Horn
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« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2004, 02:03:31 AM »

Quote from: Horns Pure Honey
I also saw another idea that is suppose to work but it is very difficult to understand. It talks about swapping things around and making a new hive and in 3 days put the two back together. It also says you can destroy all swarm cells. But all of these methods can fail if the bees make an effort to go. bye


Not in 3 days. - Swarming depends mostly on that there is not enough food on field or it is bad weathers.  It takes at least 1-2 weeks.

Conditions must be so, that swarming fever does not come any more. Put together again means that bees can collect honey efficiently.

Last summer this method did not helped. When I put them together, they started again queen cell raising. Weather was very valgue.
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Anonymous
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« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2004, 05:26:36 AM »

Cheesy Dear Finman,
I have noticed that you have good knowledge about all aspects of beekeeping, why do'not you start your own website and let us benefite from your experience. Regards Afar - Scotland
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Finman
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« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2004, 08:21:08 AM »

Quote from: Anonymous
Cheesy Dear Finman,
I have noticed that you have good knowledge about all aspects of beekeeping, why do'not you start your own website and let us benefite from your experience. Regards Afar - Scotland


No jaa... I have nursed bees since 15 years old, now 42 years. Why I am hanging here, is to take care my English language.  I know that I am a good beekeeper in amateur class.

When I was young one of the best beekeeprs in Finland teached me personally many years. I just want to deliver experiences.

And the best thing in this forum: Here is relaxed feeling. Thanks to forum keeper John Beemaster


What I have planned is to start forum "City maintenance - Beautiful city.
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Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #8 on: December 26, 2004, 08:02:01 PM »

I wouldnt want you to go Finman, I am learnning so much from you. I am going to Holland next year to visit a freind and we are going to travel around Europe. This will give me a better picture of what you have to deal with to raise bees. Thanks for all the great info, bye
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Ryan Horn
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