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Author Topic: Apiary Design  (Read 7031 times)

Offline thomashton

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Apiary Design
« on: December 18, 2004, 12:50:08 PM »
I was reading Keeping Bees today and in the section about selecting a site and designing your apiary, it suggested many things including putting your hives on a firm cement pad.

Has anyone here done that? I was considering it, but does the cement reflect too much sun, do the bees not prefer it, does it get too sticky if honey or necter is spilt? Anything you can think of that would say, "Don't do this because . . ."
After 18 months of reading and preparation, my girls finally arrived on April 11th (2006)!

Offline Horns Pure Honey

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Apiary Design
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2004, 12:58:06 PM »
I guess it all depends on what type of cement you use. If you use the smooth type that goes in a garage than it would be easy to clean up but might reflect to much sun. And the rough type is the other way around, to hard to clean up but absorbs the harsh sun rays. bye
Ryan Horn

Offline golfpsycho

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Apiary Design
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2004, 02:53:00 PM »
My bees were on cinder blocks on a cement pad.  I had no problems with weeds blocking entrances, no brood diseases, and very low mite counts.  I picked up screened bottom boards but never got around to installing them.  None of the wax ever got soggy, and they made a decent crop for the short season I had them.  I'm not so sure bees are as particular as to location as we seem to be.  Spilled honey is cleaned up rather quickly by the bees themselves, but I wouldn't suggest leaving any wax laying around.  You might end up with a chisel and hammer trying to get it off the cement.

Offline Horns Pure Honey

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Apiary Design
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2004, 03:53:25 PM »
So cement is ok. bye
Ryan Horn

Anonymous

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Apiary Design
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2004, 10:30:36 PM »
All of my hives are on 2 ft x 2 ft x 2 in thick patio stones (cement). I love them. When I set up a new hive I just level the qround (with a slight slope towards the front of the hive for hive drainage), lay down the patio stone, set two concrete blocks on top and set the hive on top of that.

If the ground is a little uneven the patio stone evens it out and prevents any moisture or weeds from coming up through. I haven't had any problems with the sun creating too much heat or any honey spills on the concrete as the bees do in fact clean it up in a hurry. I also believe that the concrete retains a little of the day's heat to keep the hive a little bit warmer into the beginning of the night.

Offline peterb

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Re: Apiary Design
« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2012, 03:27:40 PM »
I like the concrete/slab ground cover too.
I have an area of roughly 4x4 m in the corner of the garden, surrounded by fences at two sides. It catches the sun during the morning.
Bees seem to love it.
Each hive is located on a stand about 60 cm above the ground.
Main reason for this is to be gentle to my back when working on the hives.
I also think it helps to keep varoa under control. When I started the colony I got suffered from varoa.
Did the usual treatment, acid treatment in spring and since that no varoa anymore.
I think a clean floor space under and around the hive in combination of having hives higher than usual from the ground helps to get rid of varoa that drop out of hives.

Offline hardwood

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Re: Apiary Design
« Reply #6 on: August 13, 2012, 06:29:29 PM »
I've got a yard that has 16 4-way pallets of bees on an old house slab and love it! No problems from heat and I don't have to mow around them!

Scott
"In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag...We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language...And we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."

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Offline ScooterTrash

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Re: Apiary Design
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2012, 10:07:51 PM »
I don't suffer from insanity; I enjoy every minute of it.

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Offline Joe D

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Re: Apiary Design
« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2012, 09:01:00 PM »
The girls didn't fly today, but they were glad (I think) for the bee yard.  I have my bees on a concrete slab with a roof over them.  With Isaac beeing down in lower La, we have had wind and rain some yesterday and all day today.  Not as bad as Schawee or JP but the girls stayed on the landing boards.  They did get a mist when the rain blowed hard.  Well I was going to add a pic but couldn't find it.  Will try to get some and post when rain ever quits.  Ok got out between showers today and took a couple pics.
 


Joe



« Last Edit: August 31, 2012, 01:43:39 AM by Joe D »

Offline Maryland Beekeeper

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Re: Apiary Design
« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2012, 04:11:21 PM »
Thats nice Joe. Sitting through horrorcane Sandy I'm thinking I need to build a B house for the hives next year.
Cheers,
Drew

Offline beekeeperookie

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Re: Apiary Design
« Reply #10 on: December 17, 2012, 01:00:26 PM »
At my old place I used a shed that was not completely finished and cut holes on the sides of the shed to slide the bottom boards through.  I might do it again, it also can help camo your hives especially if your in a residential area.  If you use good venting, it could work