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Author Topic: Dexter cattle????  (Read 1497 times)
poka-bee
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« on: May 29, 2008, 09:39:27 PM »

I've been thinking again shocked  As usual, it's about something that poops.  Does anyone here have Dexter cattle?  Can you tell me about them if you do?  Been reading on the internet but it's always different talking w/real people!  I have a little more than an acre of pasture that's growing up quite nicely now that Haley is gone.  I'll have to cross fence some to rotate grazing. Tbones are $10.99lb this week. & it isn't even organic or natural.  We don't eat much beef cause it's so darned expensive.  Is if feasable to get a cow & breed every 1-2 years?  Sometimes you can get one that's bred w/calf a/side.  I would be sharing some of the costs w/family members so we can all have healthy meat.  I could also milk while there is a calf, we don't drink a whole lot so she wouldn't have to put out a lot of extra.  I like the idea of Dexter cause they are an old breed, and smaller=easier to handle, easier on pasture.  These do well on grass & hay, there wouldn't be any hormones or antibiotics unless used for an injury or illness PLUS they are just so darn cute.  grin  Do they eat nettles?? **hope**hope**I miss my Buckley weedeater!! Can you tie em out like goats & horses?? Would the smaller type cattle be easier on fencing?  I have field fence w/2 strands of hotwire, which by the way I'm gonna wrap the chix house with!   Thanks in advance!  Jody
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kathyp
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« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2008, 10:40:11 PM »

http://www.minicattlecountry.com/

i was looking at these mini cattle.  talked to the guy for a bit.  they seem like a good deal for a smaller place.  i wanted milk and they produce to much for me, but for beef, they might be just the right size.
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doak
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« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2008, 07:39:29 PM »

poka-bee, have you gave rabbits any thought. If it is meat you are after and doesn't have to be beef, then rabbits is the way to go. I am thinking very much about getting back in. Yes, I had over 200 at one time.
You also get the free fertilizer and you can put it strait to the garden with out composting it. Not so with chicken and cow paddies. You can also leave it under the hutch and use 2x's or 4 inch cement blocks and put some peat moss or other kind of bedding for starting and raise some fine red wigglers.
After about six month you take the top layer off and get the bottom layer out of the worm bed, "This is worm castings", then put the top layer back in with the worms still in and you are starting the cycle all over again. Again, it is said to be some of the finest plant food there is.It is claimed that pound for pound for feed the rabbits will out do any other meat animal there is. I know, the down side is to have to do this to "peter bunny". Make it easier and get the breed that looks like wild wabbits.
But, The white pink eyed ones are a big favorite. New Zelands.
doak
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johnnybigfish
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« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2008, 08:43:49 PM »

The little cows sure got my attention but after i saw the cost i about fell out of my chair!
your friend,
john
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #4 on: June 07, 2008, 10:25:15 PM »

The little cows sure got my attention but after i saw the cost i about fell out of my chair!
your friend,
john

My pocket book had an epileptic fit at the mere mention of price so I'll keep the goats for milk and the rabbits for meat.
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kathyp
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« Reply #5 on: June 07, 2008, 10:29:08 PM »

the only way the minis make sense is if you milk them or breed them.  to buy them to raise for meat is spendy.  i was looking for milk and maybe a cross bread for meat when she had to be bread again.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
doak
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« Reply #6 on: June 07, 2008, 11:31:14 PM »

Jersey or Gurnsey would be you next best bet, "IF" you could find some way to dispose of the extra milk.
doak
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #7 on: June 08, 2008, 01:34:32 PM »

>Does anyone here have Dexter cattle?

I've met some.  Does that count?

> Can you tell me about them if you do?

The ones I've met were personable, gentle pets.  From what I've read they are good milkers (for their size) and good meat.  They can even be trained to pull like an oxen (but of course less of a load).

IMO the only problem is that you have to milk them every day twice a day.  It's easy enough to get someone to throw some food to your horses, but milking is a bit more of an art.  So you are tied down a lot.

>  Been reading on the internet but it's always different talking w/real people!  I have a little more than an acre of pasture that's growing up quite nicely now that Haley is gone.  I'll have to cross fence some to rotate grazing. Tbones are $10.99lb this week. & it isn't even organic or natural.  We don't eat much beef cause it's so darned expensive.  Is if feasable to get a cow & breed every 1-2 years?  Sometimes you can get one that's bred w/calf a/side.  I would be sharing some of the costs w/family members so we can all have healthy meat.  I could also milk while there is a calf, we don't drink a whole lot so she wouldn't have to put out a lot of extra.  I like the idea of Dexter cause they are an old breed, and smaller=easier to handle, easier on pasture.  These do well on grass & hay, there wouldn't be any hormones or antibiotics unless used for an injury or illness PLUS they are just so darn cute.

Therein lies one problem.  I can butcher a cow I don't know. I have trouble butchering one that looks at me as it's friend.  It seems dishonest.

> Can you tie em out like goats & horses??

From what I saw, I would guess they would be calm enough for this.  But I haven't tried it.

> Would the smaller type cattle be easier on fencing?

I don't know.  Ponies are harder to fence in than horses...

Dexters used to have a genetic issue, but I'm guessing with DNA testing they should have bred that out by now...
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Michael Bush
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