Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
April 17, 2014, 09:38:55 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat(1)  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: My Winter Project  (Read 4424 times)
beesharp
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 52

Location: Texas


WWW
« on: December 16, 2004, 11:48:24 PM »

I did a bee removal last weekend. I tried to talk the homeowner into letting them "bee" until spring and they would have much better chance to survive. They were adament that the bees were a hazard to their backyard (obviously they had been there for a long time, but never noticed...) and they had to go or be destroyed. It was a big hive probably 2.5' tall and thicker than a basketball! We had some great weather last weekend, so as a "community service" I removed the bees with little concern for their survival considering the time of year. As I was doing the removal, I got somewhat attached to the bees. They were just sweethearts to work considering the invasive bee-vac activities going on and how big the hive was - guessing they came from a spring swarm.



I was not able to salvage any comb because of the branches growing through the combs, so I just took the 5+lbs of bees. I had a top bar hive ready in case I picked up a swarm so I dumped the bees in there with the plan of feeding them and hoping for an easy winter/good weather. Unfortunately the weather didn't cooperate and the temperature was dropping into the 20's and the bees had no food stored or any comb at all. I screened the entrance to the hive and moved it into the garage where the temperture was more moderate and hopefully they would take some syrup and start building some comb. I don't even know if the queen is there and/or OK from the removal....



Since moving them into the garage and a couple attempts with feeders that don't drown a bunch of bees they seem to be doing ok - even taking some pollen substitute. For feeding I settled on syrup in a ziplock bag with razor-slits cut in the bag. The bees line up to the slits like cows at a trough!



Do I have the most understanding wife on the planet?

Well see how it goes, pretty slim chances for this bunch...interesting anyway.
Hopefully we'll get some good weather and they can go back outside!

Jim
Logged

Beth Kirkley
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 103

Location: Eastman, Georgia


WWW
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2004, 12:51:38 AM »

That's really cool how you're going through every attempt to help them along.
At some point they will need to start flying, if for nothing else than to have their cleansing flights to go potty. Smiley
But I'd think that if they build some comb, AND if you DID get the queen, they just might make it!

Beth
(and yes, you do have an understanding wife - LOL)
Logged

Horns Pure Honey
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 148

Location: Illinois


« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2004, 07:45:36 AM »

I love to see bees build wild comb but I rather have it in my hive! It would have been cool to get a taste of there honey, o well, I guess next time. bye
Logged

Ryan Horn
Beth Kirkley
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 103

Location: Eastman, Georgia


WWW
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2004, 07:50:55 AM »

That was a beautiful hive too. If I had been you, I wouldn't have been able to resist cutting away at that comb, even if it was choppy pieces. I would have tried to be careful, but I still would have had the same goals as a bear tearing into the comb - HONEY. Secondary goal would have been to get some pieces with brood to tie into the hive.
But I can see that comb being all woven through the tree limbs wouldn't have made it easy.

Beth
Logged

Jay
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 471


Location: Concord, MA


« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2004, 09:27:20 AM »

With that feeder on the top, it almost looks like an observation hive.  Maybe you could fasion a tube from the hive to the outside world and kinda make it into an observation hive of sorts!?! Cheesy
Logged

By the rude bridge that arched the flood
Their flag to Aprils breeze unfurled
Here once the embattled farmers stood
And fired the shot heard round the world
-Emerson
Anonymous
Guest
« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2004, 11:41:33 AM »

Nice save, hope they make it. I really think I would have taken a pair of pruning shears and cut as of the much branchs away as possiable and tied it into frames. But I read you are using a top bar system so tieing comb to it may have been rather difficult eh.
 Cheesy Al
Logged
beesharp
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 52

Location: Texas


WWW
« Reply #6 on: December 17, 2004, 08:44:15 PM »

The original plan was to save some some comb and tie it into frames. I brought empty frames, string and a 5-frame nuc with me. It seemed every piece I cut out had a twig in it or an odd curl shape. I ended up with a bunch of very small pieces, so that's when I decided to try them in the top bar hive. Also, there was very little honey and no brood this time year.

The latest update is there are probably 1000 bees walking around my garage floor laughing at my attempt to keep them safely & securely in the hive -  rolleyes This might not have been my best idea!

Jim
Logged

BigRog
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 111

Location: Richmond, Virginia


« Reply #7 on: December 17, 2004, 09:28:27 PM »

We are all pulling for you and this hive.
Looks good so far.

Much Luck
Logged

"Lurch my good man,…what did you mean when you said just now that 'You've got better things to do than run my petty little errands'…….?"
Kris^
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 560


Location: Williamstown, NJ


« Reply #8 on: December 17, 2004, 09:35:10 PM »

I think it's amazing that they built all that comb out in the open, not in some creviss or trunk.  Great picture!

-- Kris
Logged
Horns Pure Honey
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 148

Location: Illinois


« Reply #9 on: December 17, 2004, 11:05:16 PM »

Wouldnt the comb get water logged every time it rained? And what about the protection of there queen, there is no way they could produce heat for the winteer. bye
Logged

Ryan Horn
TwT
Senior Forum
Global Moderator
Galactic Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3384


Location: Walker, La.

Ted


« Reply #10 on: December 17, 2004, 11:41:39 PM »

nice picture and i bet that hive weighed alot to , sure was a pretty one.
Logged

THAT's ME TO THE LEFT JUST 5 YEARS FROM NOW!!!!!!!!

Never be afraid to try something new.
Amateurs built the ark,
Professionals built the Titanic
TwT
Senior Forum
Global Moderator
Galactic Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3384


Location: Walker, La.

Ted


« Reply #11 on: December 18, 2004, 01:00:02 AM »

here a story like yours and it has pictures to.

http://www.pollinator.com/feral/calamity.htm
Logged

THAT's ME TO THE LEFT JUST 5 YEARS FROM NOW!!!!!!!!

Never be afraid to try something new.
Amateurs built the ark,
Professionals built the Titanic
Horns Pure Honey
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 148

Location: Illinois


« Reply #12 on: December 18, 2004, 05:52:55 AM »

Thats a sad one there. It would be great to have a queen that could withstand mites. to bad, bye
Logged

Ryan Horn
Jerrymac
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6047


Location: Wolfforth Texas


« Reply #13 on: December 18, 2004, 09:03:47 AM »

Never said if he went up the tree to check into the rest of hollow for more bees, queen, brood.
Logged

rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

 Jerry

My pictures.Type in password;  youview
     http://photobucket.com/albums/v225/Jerry-mac/
Horns Pure Honey
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 148

Location: Illinois


« Reply #14 on: December 18, 2004, 12:07:15 PM »

Yeah I noticed that too, but wouldnt it be to dangerous to climb up to a large oak tree that is highly rotted. Last time I looked a oak is pretty darn high and I wouldnt want to fall from one. bye
Logged

Ryan Horn
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.138 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page March 21, 2014, 11:09:11 PM