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Author Topic: Recommended Books  (Read 2533 times)

Offline Jay

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Recommended Books
« on: December 17, 2004, 12:05:24 AM »
Awhile ago, someone asked what books anyone would recommend and we all chimed in with the ones we liked best. Although I think this thread was lost in the crash, I did write down most of the books on the list and here they are as I remember them. If a book you like paticularly, is not here on this list, please add it to this thread! :D

Of course, Beekeeping for Dummies by Howland Blackiston with great pictures by our own beemaster John Clayton!

Beekeeping A Practical Guide by Richard E. Bonney

Hive Management by Richard E. Bonney

The Beekeepers Handbook ( third edition ) by Diana Sammataro and Alphonse Avitabile

The Hive and The Honeybee

The Honeybee by David Gould

Keeping Bees by John Vivian
By the rude bridge that arched the flood
Their flag to Aprils breeze unfurled
Here once the embattled farmers stood
And fired the shot heard round the world
-Emerson

Offline Horns Pure Honey

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Recommended Books
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2004, 08:46:51 AM »
There are a TON of books I know and like but I will have to do it after school, bye
Ryan Horn

Offline beesharp

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Recommended Books
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2004, 02:42:18 PM »
How to Keep Bees and Sell Honey from the Walter T. Kelly company is always on my favorite list especially considering the ~$5 price!

Jim

Offline thomashton

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Recommended Books
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2004, 05:32:25 PM »
I had a question about a particular book. In Beekeeping for Dummies, the book Observation Hives is recommended. It is published by Root publishing, the same company that published Starting Right with Bees. Has anyone read this?

My wife and I will be building a new home late next year and I was thinking that instead of a fish tank, I would like to put an observation hive in. It would be different, I could see bees year round and probably be an amazing conversation piece.

Anyway, found a book by the same name on Amazon and only one copy was for sale by a third-person seller. He wanted 117$ for it. Any good info out there on set up and maintenance of observation hives so I can begin planning early.
After 18 months of reading and preparation, my girls finally arrived on April 11th (2006)!

Offline thomashton

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« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2004, 05:42:08 PM »
Here is the book I was talking about. Seems it is out of print.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0936028122/qid=1103319446/sr=1-2/ref=sr_1_2/104-1172035-7219935?v=glance&s=books

Observation hives: How to set up, maintain and use a window to the world of honey bees

by Tom Webster
After 18 months of reading and preparation, my girls finally arrived on April 11th (2006)!

Offline thomashton

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Recommended Books
« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2004, 05:47:26 PM »
Sorry for another post. Here is the book for real with a picture and everything. Cost 14.40 pounds. Anyone know if this is worth $20 plus shipping to the states for 108 pages?
After 18 months of reading and preparation, my girls finally arrived on April 11th (2006)!

Anonymous

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Recommended Books
« Reply #6 on: December 17, 2004, 06:44:32 PM »
Observation hives are pretty simple to make, with plans and tips available all over the internet.  Beespace rules are critical, because they will build burr comb anywhere there is space. and muck up the glass obscuring the view.  We had one on a corner table in the family room for a number of years.  Just be sure you build in a way to feed them, and a way for them to remove debris and dead workers without them having to lift them the entire height of the hive.  On the one we had, the entrance was a pvc pipe right through the wall, connecting to the base of the hive.  Right next to that was a screened area, which would accept a feeder jar.  Started it with a single frame of brood and attached bees, and 3 frames of foundation stacked straight up.  THe colony started slowly and took a while to get the population up, but once it did, it became a swarm engine.

 

anything