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Author Topic: Illinois bee keeping license required  (Read 6585 times)
Horns Pure Honey
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« on: December 16, 2004, 08:26:36 PM »

I have just found out it is required to have a bee keeping license in Illinois. I was also told that they come and inspect you without notice and if they finde something wrong they dont like they have the right to burn your hive right then and there no ifs or buts about it. This means I will be working 10 times as hard to make shure nothing goes wrong with my hives, bye
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Ryan Horn
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« Reply #1 on: December 16, 2004, 09:37:26 PM »

I don't think you need to get worried. The person doing the inspection will be a aparist, and likely the only thing that they would burn your hives for is foulbrood or contagious problems that can harm others hives. More than likely, if your experience is anything like mine with your state aparist you will find it informative and could lead to contacts with other local beekeepers. Local information is very important.
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"Lurch my good man,…what did you mean when you said just now that 'You've got better things to do than run my petty little errands'…….?"
Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2004, 07:51:21 AM »

It isnt to bad. I just think that if for some reason one of my hives got something and I started to treat it and they say "sorry, gotta get rid of it" that would devistate me. So I am going to watch my hives even harder than planned and that is pretty darn hard. bye
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Ryan Horn
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« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2004, 11:51:19 AM »

I think I would ask just what reasons they may have for burning hives. I would bet you would find out that the Number one and two  reasons are AFB & EFB and I agree with the burning in that case. I burnt two hives this year just over a suppect case of AFB rather than take a chance. Turned out it wasn't either but better safe than sorry I say since there is another bee keeper a 1/2 mile away from me.
 cheesy  cheesy His bees are always coming to our flower beds & intermingle with ours.
 Cheesy Al
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ddbarnhizer
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« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2004, 03:35:49 PM »

The real problem with this is that I'm sure that Illinois never bothered to analyze whether this licensing scheme would actually improve beekeeping in the state. I wonder how much the program costs the people of Illinois and whether it's prevented a single outbreak of disease.
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Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2004, 06:01:55 PM »

That is what I think, I think it is more of a money deal than honey deal. I am finding out what it cost tonight. I am shure it was just another dumb skeem from are lovely Gov. Rod whom every hates. He has only stayed in the Gov. mansion 3 times in his term and we are getting closer and closer to the end of it. O well, bye
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Ryan Horn
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« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2004, 10:40:50 AM »

In general, beekeepers are often too attached to both their bees, and their hives, to rationally and calmly decide burning is the best option. In a way, it's better if the decision is taken away from you, as it's best for you and your neighbours in the long run. Destroying hives with AFB minimises the chance of you infecting them with AFB, and in the long run, decreases the chance you'll be reinfected in the future by such a disease. Here in the UK, bee inspectors are well respected and accompanying them as they inspect your hives is both educucational and informative. It's worth taking the morning off work to see them as they work so camly, queitly and efficiently - and they are always happy to tell you what they see in the hive, how it compares with others for the time of season, how their temperment compares, any unusual things you'd not often spot - e.g two queens in superscedure etc. Mine even marked my queens for me!


Adam
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Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2004, 12:01:25 PM »

Sounds good to me. I think I would def. make the decission to burn if I had any major problems I just hate the thought of doing it to something I worked so hard on but it must be done. Maybe it is best they call the shots. bye
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Ryan Horn
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« Reply #8 on: December 18, 2004, 05:12:23 PM »

Smiley When you get attached to some thing it is very hard to use proper judgement when it comes to putting down a loved animal be it your pet dog or the bees you keep for a hobby. It just goes againest the grain to do so for most people.
 Cheesy Al
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Anonymous
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« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2004, 01:04:36 PM »

The argument that refusing to put down something that you've worked hard on is absurd. Although a government inspector may occasionally find a hive that needs to be destroyed, the odds of them doing so are vanishingly small unless they are out in your yard on a monthly basis. At that point the cost of the licensing scheme and government administrative costs would be huge. And the odds that the government inspector would spot a hive that needs to be destroyed when the owner would not have done it in the first place are even smaller. I have yet to see a licensing scheme that makes sense on a cost benefit analysis.

I also don't buy the sentimental argument that a beekeeper wouldn't be willing to destroy a diseased hive. People put down their dogs, cats, horses, cows, sheep, fish, etc. all the time when they're sick and dying. The idea that you need a government official to invade your private property on a regular basis so that he / she can tell you to do something you already would have done (and charge you for the "privilege" on top of that) is both ridiculous and slightly depressing.
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BigRog
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« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2004, 04:11:12 PM »

My inspection was free and I was happy to have a experienced hand there. He saw things that I would have missed and was able (again for free) test the varroa in my hive to see if it was pesticide resistant. I am never in favor of goverment but I got the feeling that this guy was a beepeeker first and a agent of the state second.
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"Lurch my good man,…what did you mean when you said just now that 'You've got better things to do than run my petty little errands'…….?"
Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #11 on: December 20, 2004, 04:55:10 PM »

I hope that is how my agent turns out to be, nice and free is a perk. I really dont like some of are state workers, my mom is a state worker. I have met alot of them through her and most are nice but some of her boss's are evil evil  to be nice. Wish me good luck! bye
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Ryan Horn
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« Reply #12 on: December 22, 2004, 02:58:11 AM »

ILLINIOS BEES AND APIARIES ACT with Rules
 
 

BEES AND APIARIES ACT
[510 ILCS 20/1 et seq.]
Illinois Compiled Statutes
Chapter 510. Animals
Act 20. Bees and Apiaries Act


Section 1. Short Title
This Act shall be known and may be cited as the "Bees and Apiaries Act". Added by P.A. 82-722, § eff. July 1, 1982.


Section 1a. Definitions
As used in this Act, unless the context otherwise requires:

"Abate" means the destruction or disinfection of bees, colonies, or items of bee equipment by burning or by treatment specified by the Department.

"Apiary" means a place where one or more hives or colonies of bees are kept.

"Bee diseases" means any infectious or contagious diseases of bees as specified by the Department, including but not limited to American foulbrood.

"Bee equipment" means hives, supers, frames, or any other devices used in beekeeping.

"Bee parasites" means any parasite of bees as specified by the Department.

"Beekeeper' means a person who keeps bees.

"Beekeeping" means the raising or producing of bees, beeswax, honey, and by-products and the transporting of bees, colonies or items of bee equipment.

"Bees" means the common honey bee, Apis mellifera (L) in any stage of its life cycle.

"Colony" means the entire honey bee family or social unit living together.

"Compliance agreement" means a written agreement between a registrant or other person handling or moving bees, colonies or items of bee equipment and the Department, in which the former agrees to specified conditions or requirements so as to remain in compliance with the terms of this Act.

"Department" means the Illinois Department of Agriculture.

"Director" means the Director of the Illinois Department of Agriculture or his or her authorized agent.

"Exotic strain of bees" means any developed strain of bees not known to be present ordinarily in the State as specified by the Department.

"Hive" means a frame hive, box hive, box, barrel, log gum, skep or any other receptacle or container, natural or artificial, or any part thereof, which is used or employed as a domicile for bees.

"Inspection certificate" means an official record stating that the bees, colonies, or items of bee equipment have been inspected by an inspector of apiaries or other officer charged with similar duties from this State or other states for bee diseases, bee parasites or other nuisances and found to be in compliance with this Act or Illinois entry requirements.

"Nuisance" means bees, colonies, or items of bee equipment where bee diseases, bee parasites or exotic strains of bees exist; or hives that cannot be readily inspected; or colonies that are not registered.

"Packages" means bees with or without food supply in special containers for their transportation.

"Permit" means a statement of authorization to allow bees, colonies, or items of bee equipment to enter the State or to move within the State whether or not an inspection certificate is available.

"Person" means any individual, firm, partnership, association, corporation, or other organized group of persons whether incorporated or not.

"Registrant" means the person applying for registration of the apiary or apiaries and the colonies of bees.

"Registration" means the recording of the registrant's name, address, apiary location and any other pertinent information on a printed form prescribed by the Department.

Amended by P. A. 88-138 §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1994.
 



Section 2. Registration
(a) Every person keeping one or more colonies of bees shall register with the Department annually.

(b) Every person keeping one or more colonies of bees may be required to post his or her registration number in a prominent place within each apiary under his or her control.

Amended by P. A. 88-138 §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1994.
 


Section 2-1. Nuisances.
All bees, colonies, or items of bee equipment, where bee diseases, bee parasites or exotic strains of bees exist; or hives that cannot be readily inspected; or colonies that are not registered, are declared to be nuisances to be regulated as prescribed by the Department.

If the Department finds by inspection that any person is maintaining a nuisance as described in this Section, it shall proceed to regulate the nuisance by methods or procedures deemed necessary for control in accordance with rules and regulations of the Department.

If the owner or beekeeper cannot be found or will not consent to the terms for regulation of the nuisance, the Department shall notify in writing the owner or beekeeper, disclose the fact that nuisance exits and prescribe the method by which the nuisance may be abated. The notice declaring that a nuisance exists and ordering its abatement shall include:

(1) a statement of conditions constituting the nuisance;
(2) establishment of the time period within which the nuisance is to be abated;
(3) directions, written or printed, pointing out the methods that shall be employed to abate the nuisance;
(4) a statement of the consequences should the owner or beekeeper fail to comply.

The notice may be served personally or by certified mail with a return receipt requested. The directions for abatement of a nuisance may consist of a printed circular, bulletin or report of the Department, the United States Department of Agriculture or others, or an extract from such document.

If the person so notified refuses or fails to abate the nuisance in the manner and in the time prescribed in the notice, the Department may cause the nuisance to be abated. The Department shall certify, to the owner or beekeeper, the cost of the abatement. The owner or beekeeper shall pay to the Department any costs of that action, within 60 days after certification that the nuisance has been abated. If the costs of abatement are not remitted, the Department may recover the costs before any court in the State having competent jurisdiction.

Added by P.A. 88-138, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1994
 


Section 2-2. Indemnity.
If State funds are available for paying indemnity, the Department shall pay to the registrant of the bees an indemnity of $25 for each colony destroyed by the Department.

Added by P. A. 88-138, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1994.
 


Section 2-4. Right of entry.
The Department shall have the power to inspect or cause to be inspected from time to time any bees, colonies, items of bee equipment or apiary. For the purpose of inspection, the Director is authorized during reasonable business hours to enter into or upon any property used for the purpose of beekeeping.

Added by P. A. 88-138, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1994.
 


Section 2a. Intrastate transportation.
(a) No person shall transport a colony of bees or items of used bee equipment between counties within this State without a permit or compliance agreement which shall be issued based upon an inspection certificate from the Department.
(b) A colony of bees or items of used bee equipment transported in violation of this Section may be held and inspected by the Department, ordered returned to the place of origin, or abated.

Added by P. A. 88-138, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1994.
 


Section 2b. Import.
(a) No person shall transport a colony of bees or items of used bee equipment into this State from another State or country having an inspector of apiaries or other officer charged with similar duties, without a permit or compliance agreement which shall be issued based upon an inspection certificate. Such colony or items of used bee equipment may be subject to inspection by the Director upon entry into the State.

(b) No person shall transport a colony of bees or items of used bee equipment into this State from another State or country not having an inspector of apiaries or other officer charged with similar duties, unless the shipper or consignee has obtained from the Department a permit or compliance agreement for the shipment into the State. Such colonies or items of used bee equipment may be inspected by the Director after arrival in the State. A colony of bees or items of used bee equipment found to be infected with bee diseases or infested with bee parasites, or exotic strains of bees shall be ordered returned to the place of origin or abated.

(c) A colony or item of used bee equipment transported in violation of this Section may be held and inspected by the Department, ordered returned to the place of origin, or abated.

Added by P. A. 88-138, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1994.
 


Section 2b-1. Transportation of packaged bees.
(a) No person shall transport packaged bees for sale between counties within this State without an inspection certificate.

(b) No person shall transport packaged bees for sale into this State from another State or country without an inspection certificate.

Added by P. A. 88-138, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1994.
 


Section 2b-2. Inspection of bee colonies for sale or trade.
The Department may require colonies of bees or items of used bee equipment being given, sold, leased, traded, or offered for sale in Illinois to be inspected.

Added by P. A. 88-138, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1994.
 


Section 2c. Diseases, parasites or exotic strains; quarantine and transportation.
Upon a finding that there exist in this State, or in any other state, territory, district, province or country bee diseases, bee parasites, or exotic strains of bees, the Director may impose and enforce a quarantine restricting the transportation of bees, colonies, or items of used bee equipment capable of carrying bee diseases, bee parasites or exotic strains of bees into, within or throughout the State. In carrying out the provisions of this Section or any quarantine, the Director may, at the expense of the owner, when an infestation, infection or nuisance is located, seize or abate bees, colonies, or items of used bee equipment.

When the Director finds that there exist in any other state, territory, district, province or country bee diseases, bee parasites or exotic strains of bees, with respect to which the United States Secretary of Agriculture has not established a quarantine, and that the bee diseases, bee parasites or exotic strains of bees coming therefrom into this State are likely to convey such diseases, infestations or nuisances, the Director shall report such fact to the Governor. The Governor may thereupon, by proclamation, prohibit the transportation into this State of such bees, colonies, or items of used bee equipment except under such regulations as may be prescribed by the Department.

Amended by P. A. 88-138, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1994.
 


Section 3. Report
The Department shall, each July, make a report to the Governor and also to the Illinois State Beekeepers' Association, stating the number of apiaries visited, the number of those diseased and treated, and the number of colonies of bees abated.

Amended by P. A. 88-138, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1994.
 


Section 3a. Intergovernmental cooperation
The Director may cooperate with any other agency of this State or its subdivisions or with any agency of any other state or of the federal govemment for the purposes of carrying out the provisions of this Act and of securing uniformity of regulations.

Added by P. A. 82-722, §1, eff. July 1, 1982.
 


Section 5. Rules and Regulations
The Director is authorized to promulgate rules and regulations for the enforcement and administration of this Act.

Added by P. A. 82-722, §1, eff. July 1, 1982.
 


Section 6. Illinois Administrative Procedure Act.
The Illinois Administrative Procedure Act(1) and the Department of Agriculture administrative hearing rules shall apply to this Act.

Added by P. A. 89-154, §5, eff. Jan. 1, 1996.
(1) 5 ILCS 100/1-1 et seq.
 


Section 7. Administrative hearings and penalties.
When an administrative hearing is held, the hearing officer, upon determination of a violation of this Act or rules or regulations promulgated under it, may levy the following administrative monetary penalties:

(1) $50 for failure to register annually with the Department.
(2) $50 for failure to post registration number in the apiary.
(3) $50 for transporting bees intrastate without a permit.
(4) $100 for maintaining hives that cannot be readily inspected.
(5) $100 for transporting bees interstate without a permit.
(6) $500 for failure to abate colonies infected with bee diseases or exotic strains of bees.
(7) $500 for violation of a quarantine.
(Cool $100 for any other violation of this Act.

In the case of a second or subsequent violation within 3 years of the first offense, the penalty shall be doubled.

Added by P.A. 89-154, §5, eff. Jan. 1, 1996.
 


Section 8. Investigation of applicants and registrants; notification of hearing; subpoenas.
(a) The Department may, upon its own motion, and shall, upon the verified complaint in writing of any person setting forth facts, investigate the actions of any applicant, registrant or any person who may be in violation of this Act. At least 10 days prior to the date set for hearing the Department shall notify in writing the person, hereinafter called the respondent, that on the date designated a hearing will be held to determine whether the respondent is in violation of the Act, and shall afford the respondent an opportunity to be heard in person or by counsel. Written notice shall be served personally on the respondent, or by certified mail, return receipt requested, sent to the respondent's business address as shown in his or her latest notification to the Department.

(b) The Department, over the signature of the Director, may subpoena any persons in this State and take testimony orally, by deposition, or by exhibit, in the same manner and with the same fees and mileage as prescribed in judicial proceedings in civil cases.

Added by P.A. 89-154, §5, eff. Jan. 1, 1996
 


Section 9. Administrative review.
All final administrative decisions of the Department are subject to judicial review under Article III of the Code of Civil Procedure(1). The term "administrative decision" has the meaning ascribed to that term in Section 3-101 of the Code of Civil Procedure(2). Proceedings for judicial review shall be commenced in the circuit court of any county permitted by Section 3-104 of the Code of Civil Procedure(3).

Added by P.A. 89-154, §5, eff. Jan. 1, 1996.
1) 735 ILCS 5/3-101 et. seq.
2) 735 ILCS 5/3-101.
3) 735 ILCS 5/3-104.
 




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


TITLE 8: AGRICULTURE AND ANIMALS
CHAPTER I: DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
SUBCHAPTER b: ANIMALS AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
MEAT AND POULTRY INSPECTION ACT REGULATIONS)

PART 60
BEES AND APIARIES ACT



Section
60.10 Definitions
60.20 Registration; Colony Identification
60.30 Inspection
60.40 Equipment
60.50 Diseased or Parasitized Colonies; Exotic Strains
60.60 Permits
60.70 Quarantine

AUTHORITY: Implementing and authorized by the Bees and Apiaries Act [510 ILCS 20]

SOURCE: Rules and Regulations Relating to the Bees and Apiaries Act, filed March 4, 1970, effective March 15, 1970; amended May 18, 1971, effective May 28, 1971; amended January 18, 1974, effective February 1, 1974; codified at 5 Ill. Reg. 10447; Part repealed, New Part adopted at 6 Ill. Reg. 7385, effective July 1, 1982; amended at 20 Ill. Reg. 2390,
effective January 25, 1996.

Section 60.10 Definitions
"Bee Parasites" means the parasitic bee mites, Varroa jacobsoni or Tropilaelaps clareae.

"Exotic Strain of Bees" means any African or Africanized honey bees or any developed strain of bee not known to be present ordinarily in the State that may present a hazard to beekeeping and/or the public.

"Infestation" means the presence of bee parasites or exotic strains of bees.

"Moved (Movement, Move)" means shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported, moved or allowed to be moved, by any person by any means. Movement and move shall be construed accordingly.

"Quarantine" means a circumstance in which bees, colonies, bee equipment or honey is restricted to the existing location, unless allowed to be moved or the honey extracted and removed under permit or compliance agreement with the Director.

"Registration Certificate" means a certificate provided by the Department to a beekeeper upon acceptance of the application for registration. The certificate shall be numbered and show each beekeeper's name and mailing address.

"Scientific Permit" means a document issued by the Department to allow the movement of regulated articles to a specified destination for scientific purposes.

(Source: Amended at 20 Ill. Reg. 2390, effective January 25, 1996)
 


Section 60.20 Registration; Colony Identification
a) Any person acquiring ownership or possession of bees shall within ten (10) days of such acquisition file an application for registration with the Department.

b) Any person moving bees into this State from another state or country shall within ten (10) days after arrival file an application for registration with the Department.

c) Any person owning or possessing bees in the State shall during the month of November of each year file with the Department an application for registration to renew his or her current registration.

d) Application for registration will be made on forms available from the Department. The registration information shall include:
1) The beekeeper's name, mailing address, county of residence, phone number and date.

2) The county name and exact location (such as township, section number, road number, street address, etc.) where the bees are kept.

3) The current number of colonies at each location.

4) The name of the landowner of each site where apiaries are maintained.
 


e) The Department will issue to beekeepers a registration certificate after the Department receives the application. All registration certificates will remain valid unless cancelled by the Department when it is determined that a beekeeper is no longer keeping bees or at the registrant's request.

f) All apiaries shall be identified. This identification shall consist of the State abbreviation "IL" followed by the beekeeper's Illinois registration number in weatherproof lettering not less than one-half inch in height. The number shall be displayed prominently on the front of a hive.

g) All bees or colonies not registered with the Department shall be declared a nuisance. The beekeeper shall have 30 days in which to register. Failure to comply within 30 days will result in abatement of the nuisance.

h) There shall be no registration fees.

(Source: Amended at 20 Ill. Reg. 2390, effective January 25, 1996)
 


Section 60.30 Inspection
a) Every beekeeper shall when requested by the Department provide the location of all bees, colonies and bee equipment owned or in his or her possession.

b) The Department may require that the beekeeper assist in locating and handling bees, colonies and bee equipment so that inspection may be properly performed.

(Source: Amended at 20 Ill. Reg. 2390, effective January 25, 1996)
 


Section 60.40 Equipment
a) Any hive from which all frames or honeycomb cannot be readily removed for inspection including cross-comb hives or any hive in any situation where adequate or efficient inspection is difficult, impractical, or impossible is hereby declared a nuisance.

b) When such a nuisance is declared, the colony owner and/or beekeeper shall be notified in writing via certified mail to cease the use of such hives. Compliance must be effected within 90 days from the receipt of the notice by the beekeeper.

c) When the beekeeper has failed to comply within the 90 day period, the Department will issue a notice to the colony owner and/or beekeeper ordering the nuisance to be abated. The nuisance must be abated with 7 days from the date of receipt of the notice by the beekeeper.

(Source: Amended at 20 Ill. Reg. 2390, effective January 25, 1996)
 


Section 60.50 Diseased or Parasitized Colonies; Exotic Strains
a) Any colony of bees within the State found to be infected with American foulbrood disease shall be abated. All combs, frames, honey and bees must be abated by burning in a pit at least 18 inches deep and then covering the ashes with at least 6 inches of soil. Hive bodies, supers, bottom boards, inner covers and outer covers can be salvaged by sanitizing with a scorching flame.

b) Bees, colonies or items of bee equipment can be moved within or into the State if treatment for the control of bee parasites using United States Environmental Protection Agency approved substances has been initiated not more than 30 days prior to movement.

c) No person shall possess exotic strains of bees within the State. Any colony within the State found to contain exotic strains of bees shall be abated. Colonies or package bees accepted from any area known to be infested with exotic strains of bees must be certified by the USDA or any state apiary inspection program as being European by using any USDA approved identification method.

d) The regulation of bees or colonies in an Africanized honey bee area shall be in accordance with the European Honey Bee State Certification Procedure of the Model Honey Bee Certification Plan (November 20, 1991) as approved by the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture (1156-15th Street N.W., Suite 1020, Washington, DC 20005) and the United States Department of Agriculture Interagency Technical Working Group on the Africanized Honey Bee (Agricultural Research Service, National Program Staff, Beltsville, MD 20705).

(e) Incorporations by reference do not include any amendments or editions beyond the date specified and may be viewed and/or copied at the Department's Springfield office.

(Source: Amended at 20 Ill. Reg. 2390, effective January 25, 1996)
 


Section 60.60 Permits
a) No person shall move bees, colonies or used bee equipment from one county to another within the State, or into this State from any other state or country, without notifying the Department in person, in writing or by telephone at least ten days prior to such movement to allow issuance of a permit.

b) The permit shall specify the following information:
1) Beekeeper's name and mailing address.

2) The apiary registration number as assigned or other unique identification codes and/or marks or similar information.

3) The origin of the bees or equipment being moved.

4) The number of colonies or nature of equipment being moved.

5) The destination of the bees or equipment being moved.

6) The date when movement will be made.

7) The date of treatment for bee parasites.
 


c) A permit shall be issued if bees or equipment being moved from county to county or into the State of Illinois have been inspected within 90 days before the date of shipment. The person moving the bees or equipment into Illinois shall furnish to the Department an inspection certificate signed by an authorized inspector, entomologist, or other responsible official identifying all bee diseases and bee parasites and any controls that were implemented.

(Source: Amended at 20 Ill. Reg. 2390, effective January 25, 1996)
 


Section 60.70 Quarantine
a) The area to be quarantined will be designated by commonly accepted and readily identifiable boundaries (i.e., counties). Boundaries shall be changed by the Director to include contiguous areas if it has been determined the harmful disease, parasite or exotic strain has spread into that area.

b) A quarantine will include specific restrictions on or requirements for movement into, out of, or through the quarantine area.

c) A quarantine will specify the articles to be regulated and, if required, those exempted.

d) A quarantine will specify the measures to be undertaken to control or eradicate the harmful disease, parasite or exotic strain.

e) The Director may stop, inspect and seize, destroy, or otherwise dispose or order disposal of regulated articles found in violation of a quarantine.

f) If the Director determines that the harmful disease, parasite or exotic strain for which a quarantine has been implemented has been controlled or eradicated according to the Department's recommendation, he or she shall cancel a quarantine.

(Source: Amended at 20 Ill. Reg. 2390, effective January 25, 1996)

I WOULD HAVE TO MOVE FROM THIS STATE, TO MANY LAWS wink
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THAT's ME TO THE LEFT JUST 5 YEARS FROM NOW!!!!!!!!

Never be afraid to try something new.
Amateurs built the ark,
Professionals built the Titanic
Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #13 on: December 22, 2004, 01:06:28 PM »

Thanks for all the info. bye
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Ryan Horn
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« Reply #14 on: December 22, 2004, 01:48:58 PM »

Hey whats going on.
By the way buzz, I visited you 2 days ago and you got me totally interested in bees. I live in CA but might move to ID so I can't do bees now but can in ID.
 afro
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B.A.A
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« Reply #15 on: December 22, 2004, 01:55:02 PM »

Quote from: Anonymous
The argument that refusing to put down something that you've worked hard on is absurd. Although a government inspector may occasionally find a hive that needs to be destroyed, the odds of them doing so are vanishingly small unless they are out in your yard on a monthly basis. At that point the cost of the licensing scheme and government administrative costs would be huge. And the odds that the government inspector would spot a hive that needs to be destroyed when the owner would not have done it in the first place are even smaller. I have yet to see a licensing scheme that makes sense on a cost benefit analysis.

I also don't buy the sentimental argument that a beekeeper wouldn't be willing to destroy a diseased hive. People put down their dogs, cats, horses, cows, sheep, fish, etc. all the time when they're sick and dying. The idea that you need a government official to invade your private property on a regular basis so that he / she can tell you to do something you already would have done (and charge you for the "privilege" on top of that) is both ridiculous and slightly depressing.


True, but they often take them to the vet, for get confirmation that this is required. This is no different to getting help from an Inspector. Lots of people do, sadly, put their animals down, but their is also a minority who let their animals suffer, in squalour and neglect. Bee Keepers are no different, and they may ignore the problem, or simply, never look under the queen excluder (and some bee keepers quite literally just "havest the honey" without ever checking the brood says my local bee inspector - they get checked anually. That is, when he visits!

Also, many people fail to recognise EFB certainly, and some AFB at early stages, also,  what about when it's infecting ferral colonies and infecting a wide area. I know of a commerical beekeeper who EFB spotted in a hive whilst I and several other beekeepers were present. I can assure you, it's not much to see, and is very very easily mistaken for other things, like chalkbrood. All the pictures in the world in magazines and books can prepare you what to spot for, but when it's on old comb, or the light is bad, or you are tired, or your eyes aren't as good as they were, and it really is not so easy any more.

To treat/condemn hives, you need some kind of power to enter private property. You can't visit a wild colony on one side of a fence, then not visit a managed colony on the other side without it appearing unfair.

Also, beekeepers will, and do, refuse inspection. I, for example, know of at least five unmanaged hives within 300meters of my apiary. I know the landowner, and he contacted the beekeeper on my behalf. sadly, the beekeeper has passed away, and his wife is unwilling to pass the colonies on, or deal with them. In the end, I got the local bee inspector to check them over.

Quote
And the odds that the government inspector would spot a hive that needs to be destroyed when the owner would not have done it in the first place are even smaller.


This is most definately not the case in the UK, see here:

You'll see the incidence of disease

click this link

Perhaps US beekeepers are better trained at AFB and EFB diagnoises than  in the UK, but I think it's unlikely.


Quote
I have yet to see a licensing scheme that makes sense on a cost benefit analysis.


Actually, in the UK, our government are attempting to cut back on bee inspectors, and it is being fought rigourosly. The cost-benefit ratio of bee inspectors is actually very high, and has been documented below. Given the cost of the program is £1.25Million, the ratio is substantial. Endemic EFB would have serious economic consequences.

Quote
BEE HEALTH UNDER THREAT
Her Majesty’s Government is planning to reduce support of the Honeybee Health Programme from £1.25 million to just £1 million. This saving of just £250K or 20% of the budget, risks the decimation of the UK honeybee population and the £100 million plus contribution that these insects make to agriculture through their pollination activities.

The Honeybee Health Programme, managed through the National Bee Unit of DEFRA, has been operating successfully for many years, helping the 30,000 beekeepers in England, 95% of whom operate on a small scale, to control diseases that can destroy honeybee colonies. The diseases include American Foul Brood, European Foul Brood and Varroosis. Since the arrival of Varroa (a parasitic mite that kills honeybee colonies) in this country in 1992, wild colonies of honeybees have died out and it is only beekeepers that maintain stocks of honeybees.

The Government’s own survey conducted by ADAS, published in 2001 showed that honeybees contribute at least £120 million to the agricultural economy of the country. This does not include the benefit to horticulture or to the environment as a whole. The survey underlined that the Honeybee Health Programme was very important in protecting our bee stocks from the introduction of disease from outside this country.

In fact the next threat to honeybees, the Small Hive Beetle, has already been found in Portugal and other members states of the EU. This pest has devastated bee colonies in USA after being introduced from South Africa. It is only a matter of time before it arrives on our shores. When it does, beekeepers will need all the help they can get to defend their bees. The planned Government cuts mean that there will not be adequate professional support in the battle against the beetle.

The British Beekeepers’ Association (BBKA) fears that if these cuts are made, many small scale beekeepers will give-up keeping bees because they will not have access to local professional support should their bees become sick.


I don't know about where you are, but this service is provided free in the UK! Cheesy  

Adam
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buzzybody
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Location: Newbury Park, CA


« Reply #16 on: December 22, 2004, 01:57:10 PM »

Ventura County
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B.A.A
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« Reply #17 on: December 22, 2004, 02:09:40 PM »

Quote from: BigRog
My inspection was free and I was happy to have a experienced hand there. He saw things that I would have missed and was able (again for free) test the varroa in my hive to see if it was pesticide resistant. I am never in favor of goverment but I got the feeling that this guy was a beepeeker first and a agent of the state second.


In other words, you're forcing other taxpayers to subsidize your beekeeping by paying this guy's salary and testing costs.
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Anonymous
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« Reply #18 on: December 22, 2004, 02:20:50 PM »

Quote
And the odds that the government inspector would spot a hive that needs to be destroyed when the owner would not have done it in the first place are even smaller.

This is most definately not the case in the UK, see here:

You'll see the incidence of disease

click this link

Perhaps US beekeepers are better trained at AFB and EFB diagnoises than  in the UK, but I think it's unlikely.


ddbarnhizer -
What your figures show is that you have a wasteful government program that apparently does not stop the spread of Varroa or AFB / EFB. Your statistics are meaningless without comparison to jurisdictions without government mandated inspections / licenses.

Likewise, there's nothing in those statistics to demonstrate the number of false positives or negatives. Perhaps the English have managed to find a large number of competent bureaucrats on sinecures, but I doubt it.

Sorry for the anonymous posting, BTW - I'm logged in, cookies are on, and my username is in the text bar but  the post keeps telling me that my username is already taken.
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Anonymous
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« Reply #19 on: January 01, 2005, 03:24:28 PM »

Hey I'm from Illinois too, and i found out about the laws last year so i scrambled to get registered and stuff. Hey they give u like 25 bucks to compensate for your hive. But it really doesn't cuz they cost like over a hundred bucks.



BeeBoy
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