Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
April 19, 2014, 03:40:35 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: borage ?  (Read 2220 times)
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 14809


Location: boring, oregon


« on: May 19, 2008, 02:01:57 PM »

can this plant be divided?  i have a huge plant that has been in the same spot for 15 years.  i'd like to move part of it, but don't know if i can divide it and don't want to dig into it until i know.  ??
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
MrILoveTheAnts
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 716


Location: Somerdale, New Jersey


WWW
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2008, 02:41:13 PM »

Divide borage? Borage is an annual, and I think this applies world wide.
Logged

kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 14809


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2008, 02:59:21 PM »

it does die back every winter, but it comes back with a vengeance each spring.  in the past, i have chopped it down because it gets so big.  this year i thought i'd try to cultivate it in another spot if i can.  guess i could try seeds......
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
MrILoveTheAnts
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 716


Location: Somerdale, New Jersey


WWW
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2008, 03:14:22 PM »

I've had lots of luck with seeds, though I don't have any now. It does a great job of reseeding itself. I've got a bunch coming up from last years. I suppose if you have multiple plants you could move a few now while they're still young.
Logged

reinbeau
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2502


Location: Hanson, MA and Lebanon, ME


« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2008, 05:38:40 PM »

Borage is a self-sowing annual.  Move/separate the seedlings when they're young, they don't like to be moved and will sulk a bit, but give them enough water and they'll get over it.
Logged


- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

Click for Hanson, Massachusetts Forecast" border="0" height="150" width="256
ooptec
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 196


Location: Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada


WWW
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2008, 09:29:16 PM »

Hey,

Here on the big prairieeee they grow borage by the square mile. If anyone plants near to me around here I'm moving a hive smack dab in the middle.    lol

Am I dreaming or is some honey sold as borage honey like buckwheat and clover??

Some kind of holistic medicinal use I believe and the flowers are edible in salads.

cheers 

peter

Logged

reinbeau
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2502


Location: Hanson, MA and Lebanon, ME


« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2008, 09:37:04 PM »

Borage blossoms taste like cucumbers, they're lovely in a salad.  I think the leaves do, too, but you want to take them young, they do get tough and have sharp hairs on them.

According to this webpage, borage is used to treat depression and reduce fevers.  There is also an interesting page on the magic and superstition surrounding borage.

Google Borage Honey and you'll get plenty of hits!  Sounds delish, but I'll just let them blend the borage nectar in with everything else.
Logged


- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

Click for Hanson, Massachusetts Forecast" border="0" height="150" width="256
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2008, 09:46:11 AM »

Kathy, you are not speaking of borage.  I am positive you are speaking of Comfrey, the cousin to Borage.  The flowers are nearly the same, the plants similar, but one is perennial, that be the Comfrey and one is annual, heavy duty self-seeders, Borage.

You say that it comes up every year, yes, comfrey does do that.  YOu can cut and dig and cut and dig this plant til the cow's come home.  It will only get bigger and bigger and every tiny little bit of root that has been trashed to somewhere else or left in the ground will start new plants everywhere.  The mother plant gets about 7 feet tall, and hundreds and hundreds of drooping flowers of that electric midnight blue in colour shade.  Let me tell you, I know about comfrey, just ask.

The bombus love comfrey, I have never ever seen a honeybee on it, the flowers are too deep, and they can't get the nectar.  I cut mine back about 3 times during the summer because it gets so big that I can't stand it.  It keeps on blooming and blooming because of the cutting back.  I literally rip the leaves out until there is only a small little bit of leaf.  In a couple of weeks the plant is as big as it was when I ripped it out.  I am going to find a couple of pictures and post them here for you.  Look and see, you will see that your Borage, I am positive is Comfrey.  An invasive species, through the root system, as Borage with the self-sowed seeds can also be invasive.

I have borage coming up EVERYWHERE, even where the sun don't shine, it is amazing stuff, but greater than great for the bees.  Have that most beautiful and wonderful day, Cindi

This is the mother plant that I cut back and dig back so hard every year, trying to keep it under control, but yep, yep, good luck with that one!!!!



The beautiful drooping flowers:



And oh the bumblebees have their day, the pollen is bright orange and heavy duty stuff!!!!


Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 14809


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2008, 10:45:48 AM »

cindi, you are correct.  that's the beast.  so...i don't want to spread this thing around.  i want to get some borage.  where to heck do i find that??  smiley  can you tell that i'm not into this weird gardening stuff.  tomatoes, potatoes, corn, and squash...and some onions   grin
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
poka-bee
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1651


Location: buckley wa

I am NEVER bored!!


WWW
« Reply #9 on: May 20, 2008, 11:48:00 AM »

Kathy you should be able to find borage seeds any place that has seeds, it's an herb.  I planted some years ago & they still keep coming up.  This year I'm taking the seedlings & putting them around the property.  You might try cutting the comfry down, putting clear plastic over the stubs (bigger than the plant area) & holding it down w /rocks.  It takes awhile but it does finally bake when we get some hot sunny days...woulda been good last week!  I've had fairly good luck that way, bout 75%.  I have tons of evening primrose too, they smell so good.  They are where I don't want em though so will be trying to move em...they have a taproot that goes to China!  Jody
Logged

I'm covered in Beeesssss!  Eddie Izzard
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 14809


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #10 on: May 20, 2008, 12:41:18 PM »

all right....i'll go to the store and look for borage seeds  sad

went to the store.   no seeds.  will have to look at the farm store.

will get on the sooner next year if i don't find it this year.  i'm sure i can order them.
« Last Edit: May 20, 2008, 03:40:32 PM by kathyp » Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #11 on: May 21, 2008, 09:14:47 AM »

Kathy, Kathy, Kathy!!!  Don't you remember my posts on the seeds that I gather?  Ooops, sorry, maybe you didn't read the gardening around the house forum very much, I am a massive seed gatherer!!!  I have borage seeds by the pounds.  Would you like me to send you a whole wack of them?

Borage is one of the easiest annuals to grow.  From seed set to flower is under two months, and trust me Kathy, once you have this plant, you will never really have to plant it again, unless you want it in different areas.  It can self-seed so prolifically that it can be called "invasive". So girl, if you want borage seed, just say the word.  The post to the US is nothing, a mere dollar or so, and it would be my pleasure to send you seed.  PM me with your address, just say the word, it only takes about 2 days to get to you from Canada......have the most beautiful and wonderful day, dreamin' of borage comin' your way.  Cindi

If you would like some other bee seeds let me know.

Phacelia tanacetifolia (extremely great bee plant)
Anise anisata (extremely good bee plant) (a perennial too, so that is a bonus)
California poppy (extremely good bee plant, great for late season pollen)
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
KONASDAD
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2011


Location: Cherry Hill, N.J.


« Reply #12 on: May 21, 2008, 04:59:35 PM »

ebay is great for seeds. Borage is very good at self sowing. I didn't plant any this year, but is sprouting in lots of places.
Logged

"The more complex the Mind, the Greater the need for the simplicity of Play".
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.828 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page April 13, 2014, 11:56:04 PM