Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
December 21, 2014, 03:18:45 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Heated Hives & other Strange Ideas  (Read 1693 times)
Tucker1
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 314


Location: Pullman, Washington

"The Morning Breaks, The Shadows Flee.....


« on: May 13, 2008, 07:07:17 PM »

A while back I read somewhere (perhaps on the forum) about an idea to warm a hive in the winter using small light bulbs (~7 watt Christmas Bulbs).  I believe the basic idea was to provide just a little heat to the hive to assist the bees. Several bulbs could be used, if needed. The bulbs could be wired in parallel or series (I suspect) to help either increase their life or increase the heat output. Something would have to be done to protect the wiring and bulbs, but the basic idea sounds very feasible.

I don't believe the idea was to provide the bees with a heated hive, where life would go on like normal.......but, rather to create a system to help the bees to survive the winter. Something to assist them. Just as insulating a hive is suppose to help.

Has anyone taken this idea and built up a system?  huh

Did it work ?  huh

If not, what went wrong?  huh

Outwardly, it seems with a little PVC, a few bulbs, wire and some imagination a simple system could be constructed. 

I know that this is a bit early to be worrying about winter, but this idea is stuck in my head.

Regards,
Tucker1

Logged

He who would gather honey must bear the sting of the bees.
bassman1977
"King Bee"
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1787

Location: Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania


« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2008, 08:25:31 PM »

Finksy has done it.  He lives where the weather is just insane in the winter.  Do a search on terrarium heaters and you'll be sure to find a bunch of stuff.  It has worked for him from what I have read.
Logged

(\__/)
(='.'=)
(''')_(''')
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6436


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2008, 08:39:05 PM »

Yes,  I've used night lights for a few years now

http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php/topic,11721.0.html
Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13967


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2008, 10:06:05 PM »

I don't do anything with typical strong hives, but I have played around with heat for queen banks and nucs:
http://www.bushfarms.com/beesnucs.htm#varioussizes
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Two Bees
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 614


Location: Central NC


« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2008, 07:37:13 AM »

Along the same lines but on the opposite end of the spectrum, has anyone tried cooling a hive with a small fan similar to the type that are used to cool your computer?
Logged

"Don't know what I'd do without that boy......but I'm sure willin' to give it a try!"
J.D. Clampett commenting about Jethro Bodine.
bassman1977
"King Bee"
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1787

Location: Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania


« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2008, 07:51:05 AM »

Quote
Along the same lines but on the opposite end of the spectrum, has anyone tried cooling a hive with a small fan similar to the type that are used to cool your computer?

I asked this question a while back and the response I got was that it was not a good idea since the bees do the cooling themselves and you can over-do it with the fans.  The best way to help the hive in this manner is with the screened bottoms/slatted racks/ventilated tops.
Logged

(\__/)
(='.'=)
(''')_(''')
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6436


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2008, 07:59:55 AM »

Along the same lines but on the opposite end of the spectrum, has anyone tried cooling a hive with a small fan similar to the type that are used to cool your computer?


I tried a solar powered fan a while back.  The idea was that it would only ventilate when the sun was out.  I had issues with it consistently starting and gave up on it as ventilation boxes like that of the DE hive work great and are passive.

Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


beekeeperookie
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 185

Location: Newark, Ohio


WWW
« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2008, 10:10:11 AM »

This pass winter, I converted my shed into a honey house like you see in photos.   I cut holes for the bottom board to stick out, along the shed wall and bees had access to the outside.  Out of the three hives, two made it.  Now my shed is vented like an attic with front and back for air to go through.  It was cold in the shed during the winter but i believe it help with wind blockage, and enough temp for them to move around.  I might try it again this winter
Logged


<img src="[url]http://banners.wunderground.com/weathersticker/miniWeather02/language/www/US/OH/Newark.gif
" border=0
alt="Click for Newark, Ohio Forecast" height=50 width=150>[/url]

Beekeeping since 2007
Scadsobees
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3198


Location: Jenison, MI

Best use of smileys in a post award.


« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2008, 01:28:17 PM »

I've developed a system of tiny automatic temperature adjusted fan/heater combinations in each hive.  I need a minimum of 5,000 and the larger hives need more, up to 60,000.  They are automatic, when the hive is too hot those little fans turn on, and when it is cool out the heaters will turn on, adjusting speed and heat to the conditions. They are honey powered, so don't require cords, wires, or solar panels.   grin

I'm working on getting a patent for this system.  rolleyes

(I know, assist, but I couldn't resist!  All 9 hives made it last winter all by themselves, I'm not going to worry about it!!!)
Logged

Rick
lovelyembalmer
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 71


Location: Hickory, NC


« Reply #9 on: May 14, 2008, 01:32:22 PM »

 Smiley 8-)They are so cool to watch when they do that!!  Some will be turned in and some out, so they get a draft going through the hive.  evil don't think you can patent that, we all have it.
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13967


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #10 on: May 14, 2008, 08:51:59 PM »

>Along the same lines but on the opposite end of the spectrum, has anyone tried cooling a hive with a small fan similar to the type that are used to cool your computer?

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfaqs.htm#electricfan

The problem is that too much ventilation will not cool them.  On a hot day it will heat them.  On a hot day they are carefully controlling the water they are evaporating and the intake of hotter outside air that they are cooling.  If you bring in too much outside air, it can make it hotter.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beestopbarhives.htm#ventilation
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
afretired
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 38

Location: Green County Kentucky


« Reply #11 on: May 14, 2008, 10:39:16 PM »

Tucker1
I pulled three week hives through the winter by providing additional heat to each hive with old waterbed heaters.  I traded a guy out of a few old heaters with thermostats.  I folded them up and placed the temperature probe in-between two frames and placed the folded up heater above the frames, under the telescoping top. I don't think they would have made it without the additional heat. I set the thermostat to come on when the inside-hive temp dropped below about 80 degrees F.

Dave
Logged
Tucker1
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 314


Location: Pullman, Washington

"The Morning Breaks, The Shadows Flee.....


« Reply #12 on: May 15, 2008, 10:46:56 AM »

Thanks for all the great ideas.  I really enjoyed the photos and looking at the data.  Its seems that with a cheap PLC, a thermocouple(s) and a few 7 watt bulbs, you could work up a nice little system to help the bees. The cooling system was also very clever.

Thanks for sharing the photo's, temperature data, and all the ideas.   After seeing what you fellas have done, you should be charging the bees rent. Oh, yea......that's what the honey is.

Thanks again.

Regards,
Tucker
Logged

He who would gather honey must bear the sting of the bees.
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.199 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page December 16, 2014, 05:54:55 AM
anything