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Author Topic: What Wood??  (Read 2302 times)
Sand Creek Dairy
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« on: June 23, 2008, 01:32:11 PM »

We are thinking about using some of the wood we have here to build boxes, but was wondering what kind of wood is best? We have cedar, pine, and oak here is there any wood that is better than others? Is it about lasting power or more of what the bee's like?

Also, how many boxes and kind of boxes do I need to start?? When we start this new adventure I figure on 2 hives as a goal..is that a good starting number?
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doak
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« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2008, 03:31:46 PM »

Stay away form hard woods  such as oak, hickory, etc.
Pine and cedar is the # one choice.

At least two deeps and two mediums for each colony.
"IF" you plan to use deeps for brood. 3 mediums if using medium for brood.

I use a good grade Flat exterior paint, 2or 3 coats. Paint the outside of the boxes only.
It is up to you whether you paint the inside of the top and bottom, but if you do give them time to air out good, a week. "Do" paint the outside of top&bottom.
doak
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mark
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« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2008, 04:58:13 PM »

if just starting i suggest using all mediums.   it simplifies things greatly and the boxes are lighter.  use three or four for the brood chamber
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Sand Creek Dairy
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« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2008, 05:56:47 PM »

So how many do we stack or do we stack...do you put supers in with them? I'm so sorry I'm REALLY new to all this...
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doak
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« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2008, 06:01:44 PM »

I would suggest for a new-bee to use the stacking method.
Buy one box of the size you plan to use and use it for a pattern/temp plate.
doak
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Amilo
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« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2008, 11:37:43 AM »

I would suggest for a new-bee to use the stacking method.
Buy one box of the size you plan to use and use it for a pattern/temp plate.
doak

Thats what I did,i had a set of plans to work from but found it much better to work from a made up box.
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Sand Creek Dairy
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« Reply #6 on: June 27, 2008, 05:49:26 PM »

Thank you all!!!
We've decided to use the Cedar and I think that we are going to purchase a 'kit' with a box, hood, gloves and everything else to get started and just build from there....
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Amilo
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« Reply #7 on: June 28, 2008, 10:36:27 AM »

Now you have a catch22,do you measure all the parts before assembly so you can make your own from now on ?
Or do you do what I did and make the first box in a hurry.
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JP
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« Reply #8 on: June 28, 2008, 11:34:58 AM »

Thank you all!!!
We've decided to use the Cedar and I think that we are going to purchase a 'kit' with a box, hood, gloves and everything else to get started and just build from there....


Any wood is fine, I would avoid plywood. Hardwoods have a tendency to be heavier and you want to keep the weight down. Now if you want something that will last and last and you don't have to paint it either, go with Cypress.

All mediums would be great so that everything is of the same size and interchangeable.
http://www.bushfarms.com/beeslazy.htm#lighterboxes


...JP
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MustbeeNuts
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« Reply #9 on: June 28, 2008, 01:21:56 PM »

HI, i just started to make my own boxes as well, I use white pine so far. Soft wood inexpensive and looks fine painted or not. I already found that you would want the same size boxes, I bought a package start up and it came with deeps. I went with medium supers, now I have to make adjustments to use my deep foundations to make nucs, splits or anything else, if they where all mediums you just pull and place, no problems. all the same is best and deeps do get heavy. Smiley
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johnnybigfish
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« Reply #10 on: June 28, 2008, 10:52:48 PM »

 I only make the tops and bottoms and I, as mentioned already, used bought tops and bottoms and copied them.
Last spring I thought it would be cheaper to just buy them....Then Freight went thru the roof. If you dont count labor involved it will be cheaper to make your own.
 I'll continue to just buy mine. If I have the special (fast) saws to cut boxes out, I would make my own. To build one box requires alot of notch cutting.

your friend,
john
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #11 on: July 03, 2008, 09:32:58 PM »

Any wood will do. Pine is cheap, light and strong.  Cedar is expensive, light and strong AND resists rot.  Cypress (if you can find it) is moderately priced, light and strong AND resists rot.  Most of mine are pine boiled in beeswax and rosin.
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Michael Bush
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Greg Peck
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« Reply #12 on: July 04, 2008, 09:08:39 AM »

Make sure when you build your own boxes that you make them the exact size they are supposed to be. When I first started I made a few boxes that were about a 1/4 inch to long (dont know how that happened). The bees of course propolised (sp?) this space in and I was not able to get the frames out. I had to take the box off and let the bees leave it then tip it over and bang the frames out with a hammer. So sticking to the correct size is a good idea.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #13 on: July 04, 2008, 04:11:01 PM »

>Make sure when you build your own boxes that you make them the exact size they are supposed to be.

The length is the most critical as the frames will fall in if it's not right.  The width can vary a little without any major issues as there's some slack between the last frame and the sides anyway.
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Michael Bush
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #14 on: July 04, 2008, 06:40:24 PM »

Hard woods rot too quickly.  It will develop dry rot after a year or two.  If hard woods set where there's moisture (hive stand, etc) it will rot out completely in a couple of years.
Woods of choice, in order, are: Cypress, Cedar, Fir, Pine, Spruce, and Western Hemlock.  All soft woods, check for pricing.  Hemlock is often the cheapest but also the most fragile, it works for boxes, tops, and bottoms but not frames.
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