Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
November 01, 2014, 03:00:16 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: So You Want To Cut A Box Joint!  (Read 28457 times)
Jay
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 471


Location: Concord, MA


« on: December 07, 2004, 10:54:00 PM »

Making a box joint jig is a fairly simple operation, just be careful to pay attention to all of your measurements and will do just fine!
 
     The jig consists of two parts,the first part is a miter guage extention which supports the work piece, and keeps your fingers away from the blade.  This part is attached to your table saws miter gauge ( that half round thingy that slides in the notch in the table ).  The second part is the key/tenon, which sets the spacing between dados, and the width of the box joint tenons.

     Let's make the jig!

     1.     Cut a straight piece of 2x6 30" long. The 2x6 is the miter gauge extension.

     2.     Measure from one end, along the miter gauge extension 13", and make a mark.

     3.     Install a dado blade on your table saw and set it to the width you want for the box joint tenons. As a general rule, the tenons are the same width as the thickness of the stock you are joining. ie. If you are using 3/4" boards, set your dado blade to 3/4" width.

     Note:     Tenons are the spaces between the "teeth" of your box joint.

     4.     Set the dado blade height. Set the blade 1/32" to 3/32" higher than the stock thickness. For a 3/4" board that would be 13/32" to 15/32".
THIS STEP ASSUMES THAT YOU ARE CUTTING YOUR BOARDS A "SMIDGEN" OVER THEIR PROSCRIBED LENGTH AS DIRECTED IN THE BEESOURCE.COM PLANS. Remember when you set the dado height up by 1/32" this makes the inside dimention of the box closer by 1/16" ( a 32nd on each side ). I cut my boards to 19 15/16" instead of 19 7/8" and set my dado blade up 1/32" higher that the 3/4" height. This made my inside dimension come out to 18 3/8" just where it should be!


  The reason for giving yourself the extra length is to allow yourself some wiggle room. Remember, it's always easier to cut more off, than it is to add it back on!

     5.     Align the mark on the miter gauge extension with the center of the dado blade and cut. The dado you make with this cut holds the key in place.

     6.     Align the miter gauge extension with the blade for a second cut. Set up the second cut so the distance between each dado is exactly the same as the width of the dados. ie. For a 3/4" board make the distance between dados 3/4". You have to be pretty exact here because the space you leave here is going to create the "teeth" in the box joint. And if the space is wrong, and the "teeth" are too big ( wide ) then they won't fit into the corresponding dado ( space ).


     7.     Cut a block of wood 6" long and the same height and width as the dados ( 3/4" x 3/4" ). The block is the key in your jig. Secure the key into the first dado with a countersunk screw ( one set below the surface of the wood ). Don't glue the key in place, or you won't be able to replace it if it becomes worn or broken. I like to use hardwood here because it it doesn't get worn or dented as easily as pine. Mine in the picture is oak.


     8.     With the saw unplugged, align the second dado with the dado blade and secure the miter gauge extention to the saw's miter gauge. I just ran two drywall screws through the two holes in the miter gauge, and  into the back of the extention.


     There now, that wasn't so hard was it? Once the jig is made, the most difficult part is behind you. However, you should practice making joints in scrap before you begin on your project pieces. Always make a test joint each time you reassemble the extension to the miter gauge. Remember, if you aren't testing on scrap, you're testing on your project!

     Let's make a box joint!

     1.     Stand the work piece on end, flat against the extension, with one edge butted against the key.


     2.     Hold the work piece firmly against the extension and make the first dado in the work piece. Make a small X on the tenon created by this dado.


     3.     Reset the jig ( pull it back toward you over the blade ) and place the dado over the key. Make a second cut.

Continue cutting dados untill you run out of board.

     4.     Cut dados in the second work piece. The second work piece should mate to the first, so the dados must be offset from those on the first work piece.

Place the first work piece over the key with one full tenon ( the one marked with an X from step 2 ) between the key and the blade. Butt the second work piece against the first one and make the first dado in the second work piece.


     5.     Remove the first work piece from the jig and continue making dados until you run out of board.


     6.     Glue and clamp the pieces together to make the box joint, if you want, finish with nails.


If you use nails, predrill the holes. If you use polyurethane glue, like GORILLA glue, you probably don't need nails. Don't forget to cut your rabbets for the frames, in the ends first though. The rabbets are much easier to cut BEFORE assembly.

     7.     Since the dado blade height was set slightly deeper than the width of the stock, you should sand the raised end of the joint flush with the face of the board to which it is joined. Or, if you don't want to, forget it. The bees won't mind.

     If you have any questions about this proceedure, don't hesitate to PM me. I'm only too willing to explain myself! cheesy
Logged

By the rude bridge that arched the flood
Their flag to Aprils breeze unfurled
Here once the embattled farmers stood
And fired the shot heard round the world
-Emerson
ttitto
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2

Location: Bulgaria


« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2006, 07:07:29 AM »

Could someone please help me how to read these inch mesurements into milimeters. What does 1/32'' means, or 2x6 30"" ?? I am really in trouble with it. Thanks!
Logged
amymcg
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 458


Location: Eastern Massachusetts


WWW
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2006, 07:26:54 AM »

Try this:

http://www.metric-conversions.org/length/inches-to-millimeters.htm
Logged
ttitto
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2

Location: Bulgaria


« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2006, 10:20:16 AM »

I meant what is 1/32". Is it one thirthysecond part of the inch? And what would be 2x6 30"?? Conversion calculators need only a decimal number to calculate the value in mm.
Logged
Apis629
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 823


Location: Florida


WWW
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2006, 12:20:16 PM »

A "2X6" is a board that is 1 and 1/2 inch thick and 6 inches wide(I think it's 6 inches...it may be 5 and 1/2).  The 30" after it stands for 30 inces long.  It's called a 2x6 because, you are paying for a board milled from 2 inches thick.
Logged

Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13768


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2006, 08:51:49 PM »

A 2 by 6 is 1 1/2" by 5 1/2" (as mentioned because that's what it supposedly was before it was planed down).  1 1/2" = 38mm 5 1/2" = 140mm.

30" long is 762mm.

http://www.onlineconversion.com/length_common.htm
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
bluegrass
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 459

Location: CT


« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2006, 01:32:55 PM »

Nice arbor saw!! I don't have one though. how about a jig for a router?
Logged

Sugarbush Bees
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6415


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2006, 03:50:55 PM »

Quote from: bluegrass
how about a jig for a router?




You can catch them on sale for <$40  and it works like a champ once you get it set up.  Less exposed end grain, more glue surface and quicker to cut. Cheesy


Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


jerryc
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 12

Location: SW Washington


« Reply #8 on: March 01, 2007, 02:09:17 AM »

Table saws,Dado heads, router jigs/accessories and sanders here: <link>harborfreight.com 
One of my favorite places to shop Cheesy
Also see: <link>northerntool.com   Both of these guys send out large paper catalog if you prefer.
Logged

Jerry
Jerrymac
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6047


Location: Wolfforth Texas


« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2007, 08:46:50 AM »




I have looked at these things and can't figure out how they work just by looking. Got any demo pictures?
Logged

rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

 Jerry

My pictures.Type in password;  youview
     http://photobucket.com/albums/v225/Jerry-mac/
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6415


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2007, 09:08:47 AM »

I have looked at these things and can't figure out how they work just by looking. Got any demo pictures?


Not sure how good of job I can do explaining,  but here is a shot at it.

It cuts both boards of the joint in one pass.  You turn the boards so the joint is inside out,  and the vertical board is offset.  Here is a picture I found that shows the boards in place.


Here is an article that has some close up pictures of setting up the jig.
http://www.workbenchmagazine.com/main/wb270-dovetail01.html

It does take some time to get the offset, bit depth, and guide rail set correctly,  but then you can fly thru cutting the joints.   With four passes of a router, your box is done.  I only use mine for supers, so it stays setup and the only thing I have to mess with is the router bit depth.

Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


Jerrymac
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6047


Location: Wolfforth Texas


« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2007, 09:17:19 AM »

OH! OK. That helps a lot. Now how much metal do you take out when you hit the bit on the jig guide? Or is that not as easy to do as it looks?
Logged

rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

 Jerry

My pictures.Type in password;  youview
     http://photobucket.com/albums/v225/Jerry-mac/
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6415


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2007, 09:29:33 AM »

Now how much metal do you take out when you hit the bit on the jig guide? Or is that not as easy to do as it looks?

Well, the jig is made of aluminum just in case.  I have never hit it.  I place the router on the jig/board before I turn it on,  and pull it straight out when done cutting and set it on the bench while it winds down.   I'm sure you can easily get metal if you spin it up before putting the router on the board/jig.  Just like most wood working tools,  you need some common sense and focus on the job at hand.
Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


Jon McFadden
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 75

Location: Conway, Arkansas


« Reply #13 on: March 04, 2007, 09:23:57 AM »

If you want to make a cheap box joint jig that doesn't need adjustment, construct a sled.
Here's how:
http://nordykebeefarm.com/forum/default.asp
When you get ready to make a box joint, just place the sled in the miter gauge slots and off you go. No setup!
Logged

Jon, N6VC/5
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6415


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #14 on: March 04, 2007, 11:56:11 AM »

If you want to make a cheap box joint jig that doesn't need adjustment, construct a sled.
Here's how:
http://nordykebeefarm.com/forum/default.asp
When you get ready to make a box joint, just place the sled in the miter gauge slots and off you go. No setup!

Perhaps a direct link to the box joints would be more appropriate than a link to the front end of another forum.
Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


Jon McFadden
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 75

Location: Conway, Arkansas


« Reply #15 on: March 04, 2007, 03:04:57 PM »

I've tried using a direct link and some of the guys complain they can't open the pictures. This is the only way I get no complaints. I don't own the site. The owner asked me to moderate it for him and I post my construction projects there that I think will help fellow beekeepers.

I am not passing links to another "forum" as a forum, but as a location for information. If you will look, there is some feedback, but not a lot. I don't discourage it on that site, but I mainly look for interaction on three other sites; Beemaster, Beesource and Beeworks. If a person does register on the site they have the option of being notified of any updates as they happen. There has been one this year. Last year my son and I started raising queens. We developed a mating nuc that costs $1 per box. The guys wanted me to post it last year, but I begged off until we had a chance to try it out first. I posted the information on this last month.

There are different ways to make box joints. The most common is to use the miter gauge with a block attached. After using this method for many years (since 1968), I found a better way to do it (1997) and I would like to pass it on so others don't make the same mistake I did. If someone has a better method than this one, I would like to hear it. With this fixture, there is no setup. It is dedicated to this one operation. Just put it in the slots and start cutting perfect joints.

I have a dovetail fixture and use it for other purposes, but this box joint fixture is the only one I use for beehives.

Jon
Logged

Jon, N6VC/5
LET-CA
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 85

Location: Sacramento, CA


« Reply #16 on: March 08, 2007, 05:27:05 PM »

I am impressed!  Never thought of having true "dovetail joinery" on a beehive.  Great looking work!
Logged
SgtMaj
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1464


Location: Corryton, TN


« Reply #17 on: July 03, 2008, 06:27:55 AM »

I've tried using a direct link and some of the guys complain they can't open the pictures. This is the only way I get no complaints.

So... I guess you don't want to hear me say... I can't see any pics on there!  Sorry mate.  Not sure if they disappeared with the sony image server shutdown or what.  And that's not good because I can't see any of the jig pictures on here either, and I am very curious about this table-saw jig. 
Logged
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6415


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #18 on: July 03, 2008, 07:57:05 AM »

I am very curious about this table-saw jig. 


I built the one from wood magazine.
http://www.woodstore.net/boxjointjig.html
Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


SgtMaj
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1464


Location: Corryton, TN


« Reply #19 on: July 03, 2008, 08:03:03 AM »

Looking at that pic, I don't understand how that works.  I mean, I can see how it would hold the wood steady for the cut, but I don't see how it precisely measures out the distance between the cuts so that they'll line up with the second piece. 
Logged
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.732 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page October 31, 2014, 08:47:48 PM