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Author Topic: Here chicky chick chick  (Read 3990 times)
Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #20 on: May 13, 2008, 06:31:16 PM »

Ceder is toxic to poultry. So dont use it on them. Or they will die.


Angi

I've been using Cedar Shavings with my poultry for years, the only loses I've experienced are from deformities.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Cindi
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« Reply #21 on: May 13, 2008, 10:44:29 PM »

I have to comment here.  Two of our chicken barns are old horse box stalls, large ones.  Surrounding their box stalls is what was once the horses' paddock.  This paddock has had several enormous loads of what here is known as Bell Pole.  It is cedar bark mulch basically, but it is long, long and stingy and can only be spread with a pitch fork.  I spent tons of hours out there spreading these 15 feet high by 20 feet high piles of this stringy cedar all over the horses paddock for several years in a row.  Yep, I got huge and enormous muscles from probably a solid month of moving these piles of stringy cedar each year.  The base of this entire paddock area is probably 2 feet deep of this bell pole.

When I read the post about the cedar being so dangerous and deadly to livestock, it freaked me right out.  Now I pictured myself for the next 10 years trying to pitch fork all this stringy cedar stuff out of there.  Couldn't have done it actually.  The paddock of course has had years of manure from horses, and the barn critters on top of it.  When I turn over the mucky areas, the cedar stringy bark still has not decomposed very well, it is still pretty stingy and in tact.

Grass and weeds even grow amongst this stringy cedar bark mulch.  I think there is enough other organic material for the greens to take root, and do they ever.

We have had chickens and ducks on this paddock area for a couple of years now.  I have never seen any sick chickens or ducks.  So I wonder about people indicating that cedar is toxic too.  Maybe in enclosed small areas?  I don't know.  I know they put cedar in bedding pillows for dogs to keep fleas down, but the dogs don't come into direct contact with it.  So, I really think that more thought needs to go into the facts about cedar, toxic or not? 

Brian says that he does not have issues with poisoning from cedar.  Has anyone else ever had any issues with any type of cedar poisoning, curiosity never ever got this cat, hee, hee.  Have the most beautiful, wonderful day, we be lovin' this life we live.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
reinbeau
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« Reply #22 on: May 14, 2008, 03:06:19 PM »

I have only heard that cedar shavings are bad for chicks, the babies, not for the older ones.
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ooptec
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« Reply #23 on: May 14, 2008, 06:39:46 PM »

Hey,

Year 1 myself w/50 black sex link chicks and they are about 3 weeks old now. A few things I have learned and seem to work is if you want to stay off medication or vaccinations for coccidosis(sp?) which is common in chicks....... add about 1Tbsp. of cider vinegar to 1 gal water in their waterers. I have been adding some of my Kombucha fermented tea to all the birds waterers as one of the byproducts from its fermentation is acidic acid (vinegar). I also have been mixing in 1% kelp (seaweed) to all their feeds as it supplies all the minerals and good source of Vit B12. Big feed sack for $60 frt. in will last a few years if not more.

As far as heat lamp goes if they are all under it and peeping loudly too cold and trying to get as far away as poss., too close. I have my brooder (cardboard box) in the unheated hen house so in AM usually move the lamp up and lower a little in evening.

What fun the little cuties are.

Also I got a few year old free range layers for $1 ea and they were the deal of a lifetime as the 6 of them lay 5-6-5-6-5 humungous eggs alternating days!!!! They and the now down to 5 adult guinea fowl (had 8 and addn'l dog but now minus dog and the 3 he killed) They have the full run of the yard and quite the distraction to sit and watch for hours on end. Put their daily treat of table/kitchen scraps mixed w/milk kefir and eggs shells that I crush small enuf to fit thru kitchen colander screen in a tin loaf pan and when go out and tap ring against the pan they come tearing over from wherever they happen to be. Also hilarious watching the games of chicken rugby when one finds a fresh mouse corpse from one of the cats. Took the adult guinea's about 3 weeks in coop-pen till let out and they are here to stay now. 3 roost in coop and two dog knows where but all are out there in AM.

Hard time finding wheat in Sask. if y'all can believe that but finally found some for trade of some honey and free range eggs as is from a farmer who retired 15yrs ago and walked away from a bin w/about 100 bushels in it which he was glad to trade and just got 2 X 1/2 ton loads of screenings from the seed cleaning plant for $50 which is a good mix w/a lot of peas in it which they seem to really like. Also bought some feed oats and rolled corn as both were cheaper than the almost $14 they want for a bag of layer feed so make a mix of all and brings the cost of production way down to earth.

Also got subscription to 'backyard chicken' magazine as was under $10 for the year and among other things learned you can judge the freshness of an egg by putting in water and the lower it sinks the fresher and more towards floating the older.

Now it would only stay above freezing at nights would do rest of projects and herb garden.

Bees are working the willows hard and now dandelions are starting finally so everyone is off on another season.

cheers

peter
« Last Edit: May 15, 2008, 09:33:35 AM by ooptec » Logged

Cindi
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« Reply #24 on: May 15, 2008, 09:02:59 AM »

Peter, oh, that sounds like a great idea about using Kombucha tea.  I need to rejunenate the mother that has been sitting in a bottle in my kitchen in a dark corner.  I haven't had the chance to make any tea for awhile, just been too busy doing other stuff.  I wonder how long the mother lives for?  I looked at her this morning and she looks like she has gone dormant, off to set some Kombucha tea after I go to acupuncture and then off to Lee Valley tools.  I have broken three of my most favourite gardening implements in the past couple of weeks, I was down to the last one and it broke yesterday, rats!!!  I am going to get my Son-in-Law to take it to his pal and get it welded.  It actually broke on the metal part, go figure that one.....I am kind of afraid to go to Lee Valley tools, because, I know they got some pretty cool stuff there, hee, hee.  Beautiful and most wonderful day, lovin' life.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Brian D. Bray
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Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


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« Reply #25 on: May 16, 2008, 12:21:49 AM »

A chicken can lay a new egg every 23 hours, that doesn't mean she will or even that she wants to.  I have 13 laying hens a get 7-9 eggs a day, about average for a flock of mixed stock--Orpington/Brahma crosses.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
JoelinGA
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« Reply #26 on: June 03, 2008, 04:57:54 PM »

Wow, glad I found this thread. My wife and I plan on getting some chickens for our operation here.

Are there any good sites or books that anyone would recommend for a starter?
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reinbeau
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« Reply #27 on: June 03, 2008, 09:04:14 PM »

The Backyard Chickens Learning Center is a great place to start, and they've got a great forum where you can ask and get answers to your specific questions.
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- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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