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Author Topic: Epipens?  (Read 2873 times)
Janemma
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« on: April 16, 2008, 07:52:48 PM »

I was wondering if any of you keep an epipen at home in case of an allergic reaction to bee stings.

I am getting my first hives this year.  I have 5 children and we live a good 30 or 40 minutes from a hospital - they would probably fly in the Stars helicopter if we called 911.  I have read that some beekeepers keep an epipen at home just in case.  Do you need a prescription for this or is it something you can just get from the pharmacy as a beekeeper?  None of my children have ever been stung so I have no idea if they are allergic - or any of their friends etc....so I was wondering what you all suggest......I know the risks are low but we live so far from the city I was just wondering.......
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2008, 08:16:14 PM »

>I was wondering if any of you keep an epipen at home in case of an allergic reaction to bee stings.

Don't have one.  I've never seen one.

>I am getting my first hives this year.  I have 5 children and we live a good 30 or 40 minutes from a hospital - they would probably fly in the Stars helicopter if we called 911.  I have read that some beekeepers keep an epipen at home just in case.

I think I know one beekeeper who does, personally, but several on these forums seem to have them.

>  Do you need a prescription

Yes.

>is it something you can just get from the pharmacy as a beekeeper? 

From what I hear, apparently you can tell your doctor you are a beekeeper and they will quickly write you prescription.  Smiley

>None of my children have ever been stung so I have no idea if they are allergic - or any of their friends etc....so I was wondering what you all suggest......I know the risks are low but we live so far from the city I was just wondering.......

They are probably no more likely to get stung with beehives in the back yard than without.  Only one of my five kids was ever stung and he stepped on the bee.  We had no hives when I was young and I got stung by stepping on bees all the time.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
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Janemma
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« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2008, 08:43:14 PM »

I guess my thought is more for friends who have children who would love to come over and 'meet' my bees.....to learn all about them...but don't know if they are allergic to them....rather than just coming over to play in our yard......if they were having a look in the hive or helping while I was working at the hive.....and they got stung.

I'm not so worried of the chances if they were just visiting and hanging out at our house - I was thinking more of direct involvement with the hive.
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dlmarti
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« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2008, 08:50:31 PM »

Less than 1% of the population is allergic honey bee venom, if you concerned (which I wouldn't be), your doctor can run a test to determine if they are.

Remember that a reaction to venom is not the same thing as being allergic.  If you get stung on the leg, and your entire leg swells up, but the rest of your body doesn't, your NOT allergic.

If your allergic to honey bee venom, your entire body will react, not just the area effected.
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Bennettoid
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« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2008, 08:52:34 PM »

I wouldn't want a kid to die because I didn't have one, and yes, I have three kids that have alot of friends over, all the time.
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kathyp
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« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2008, 08:53:24 PM »

i have them.  your doctor can write for them.  make sure you get two.  make sure you get very good instructions on when and how to use them.   i have always kept epinephrine on the place because i do my own horse immunizations.  

chances are you'll never need them.  i considered it a reasonable precaution to take, but not all see the need.



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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Janemma
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« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2008, 09:29:07 PM »

Less than 1% of the population is allergic honey bee venom, if you concerned (which I wouldn't be), your doctor can run a test to determine if they are.

Remember that a reaction to venom is not the same thing as being allergic.  If you get stung on the leg, and your entire leg swells up, but the rest of your body doesn't, your NOT allergic.

If your allergic to honey bee venom, your entire body will react, not just the area effected.

I'm talking about a serious anaphylactic shock - to the point where I would have to call 911.  I realise the risk is small but it does happen.  It's obviously a concern for many beekeepers as I know many keep epipens with them (hence my question).  Yes chances of a child being stung anywhere are just as high as being stung here and their chances of being allergic are low but I still don't know how I would live with myself if they were stung here and I wasn't prepared when I know I could be.....

Thanks everyone - I think I'll get my Doc to write up a script next time I'm in.  I used to be a nurse so I should be able to figure the rest out!

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annette
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« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2008, 11:36:48 PM »

Yes, I called my dr. and told him I was a beekeeper and needed the medication to keep on hand.No problem. He gave me 2 and they are just an insurance policy.

Annette
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Shawn
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« Reply #8 on: April 17, 2008, 01:52:27 AM »

I got a perscription for one. Im not allergic, yet, but I wanted to have one just in case. I also got a doctor friend to start keeping bees. He said its a good idea to have one.
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dlmarti
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« Reply #9 on: April 17, 2008, 07:48:33 AM »

Just be smart, the epipen is more dangerous to most people than a bee sting.
Here is an ARTICLE on bee stings.

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danno
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« Reply #10 on: April 17, 2008, 08:04:16 AM »

I had two just in case.  Had a party awhile back and my brother inlaw ate shrimp.   Never bothered him before but this time he started to look chinese with labored breathing.  I let him shoot himself in the leg with one and we ran him to town.
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dlmarti
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« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2008, 08:22:22 AM »

If you live in the US, your chance of being killed by an allergic reaction to an insect sting is between: 0.000000132% and 0.0001317%

Notice I said insect sting, not just Honey Bee.  Honey Bees represent an even smaller chance.

I think I'll walk on the wild side, and skip the epipen.

Chempedia Article
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Sean Kelly
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« Reply #12 on: April 17, 2008, 08:27:32 AM »

I asked my doctor last year about this and he said he will not write me a prescription unless I personally was was allergic, which I am not.  He said it's a liability issue and doesn't want to be responsible for anything incase it's used improperly.  Guess it depends on your doctor.

Sean Kelly
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Barbara
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« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2008, 08:56:50 AM »

Since an epipen requires a prescription, and the doctor would be writing that prescription for you, I believe it would be against the law for you to use it on anyone besides yourself, including your own children.  I personally would not risk the liability of giving a drug, which epinephrine is, to anyone I didn't know well, especially one of the children in the neighborhood.  My suggestion would be to keep the liquid and pill form of Benedryl on hand, not quite as fast acting, but it will do in a pinch.  While there is still some liability if giving Benedryl to someone else, it's not quite as great as giving them a prescription drug.

Barbara
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Barbara
kathyp
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« Reply #14 on: April 17, 2008, 11:08:18 AM »

i guess it's kind of like owning a gun.  get it if you are  comfortable with it.  learn well how and when to use it.  know where you put it so that if you ever do need it, you can find it!
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
annette
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« Reply #15 on: April 17, 2008, 11:57:04 AM »

For me, the only reason I even got the epipens is my beehives are on the property of my friend who runs a yoga school. So there are always people around and many who take walks around the property. I was actually pressured into getting these pens and after reading the instructions, I do not want to be the one who administers it. I have made that fact clear to my friend.
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Rachel
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« Reply #16 on: April 17, 2008, 03:06:12 PM »

If you DO decide to get them for the kids, make sure you get the epi-pen JR.  The dose is less.  The full dose could be even more dangerous to a kid.  I have one b/c one of my little guys is allergic to peanuts.  (UGH)
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annette
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« Reply #17 on: April 17, 2008, 03:12:13 PM »

Thanks for this information!!
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Pond Creek Farm
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« Reply #18 on: April 17, 2008, 08:53:30 PM »

I personally do not recommend getting one unless you are absolutely sure you know when and how to use one and are fully aware of the issue than can arise from misuse.  Just as important is knowing when to show restraint and witholding the medication. Epinephrine is not a benign substance without risk and side effects, and used incorrectly, the cure can be worse than the perceived sickness.  Unless you know exactly when to use it and when not to use it, I suggest an OTC allergery medicine. IN the end ask your physician and be sure to disclose that you may be using this on someone else. Just my .02. 
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Brian
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« Reply #19 on: April 17, 2008, 10:09:27 PM »

An epipen is kind of like a tornado shelter...You probably wont need it but, just in case..........
 Its quite the coincidence you brought this subject up...I just got my second epipen 2 days ago....No problem with my Dr. giving me a prescription...He understands the consequences if someone IS allergic to bee or wasp or no telling what kind of stings or anaphalactic shock producing events can occur...I got mine incase my wife is allegic..She seems to be allergic to just about everything..My sons allergic to anything she missed.
 I read the instructions on this last pen I got...It states that the pen only injects 10percent of what it holds..Its made for one use, and its only good for a year...I asked my Dr. if my previous epipen would still be good..He said" Dont bet your life on it...or anyone elses"..Thats when he gave me a new script.
 The part that makes me think though is what if someone has a heart rythm problem like me? This stuff is epinephrine.
As far as using it on someone and getting sued?...I dont know,....Then again, you can get sued for doing CPR on someone too.
Read the directions before you need to use it..I had my first one for a year and never even opened the box..That would have been something if someone needed the shot and I had to read all the directions(itty-bitty letters too) while the person was suffocating tongue

your friend,
john
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