Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
April 19, 2014, 03:24:14 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: pulling frames to start an obs hive--what do I want?  (Read 759 times)
twb
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 275


Location: Southwest Michigan


« on: April 16, 2008, 05:22:39 PM »

I will be starting my first obs hive soon.  Frames of bees will come from my own hive(s) but I am not sure what to take.  Three deeps make up the obs hive until next year when I will be down to four mediums if plans go according to schedule.  Do I want open brood and queenie in lowest frame, then mainly sealed brood and then a frame of honey with some open cells for laying or storage?  Could I just put in a starter strip in the upper frame position and be ok? (that is my first choice)--But in that case I'd need honey in the middle frame with capped brood correct?  How many shakes of bees to conclude--one frame? two?
Logged

"Pleasant words are a honeycomb, sweet to the soul and healing to the bones."  Proverbs 16:24

Sincerely,
TWB
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 14809


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2008, 07:08:03 PM »

sounds like yours is just a little smaller than the one i will set up.  i'll be interested in the answers you get!  i had planned on taking 2 frames of brood and bees from a couple of strong hives, and giving them foundation for the rest of it.  then feeding until they started to get established.  i wanted to let them make their own queen.  so far, the weather has been to bad and my hives outside have not built up to the point that i feel comfortable robbing bees and brood from them.
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13475


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2008, 08:21:55 PM »

The main thing is that you want a variety of resources.  One frame of emerging brood is nice because it will quickly boost the population to make up for the ones that drift back home.  One frame of honey and  pollen, or one of each will give them some resources.  An empty frame will give them some room.  Shake in plenty of bees as half will go back to the hive.  If you want them to raise their own queen, make sure there are some eggs and even more extra bees.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Scadsobees
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3198


Location: Jenison, MI

Best use of smileys in a post award.


« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2008, 08:21:19 AM »

One thing I experienced, and I don't know if it is typical or not, but just in case....

I started with 1 medium of brood and 1 deep of brood.

I put in a frame of capped brood.  It turns out that the either it wasn't centered well, or there wasn't enough space between the glass, and the emerging brood had trouble getting out, and a whole bunch of brood died.  I ended up taking out that frame and letting them draw their own.

My observation hive overwintered with about 6 lbs of honey and less than one medium frame of bees, and they are still going, so small doesn't matter too much unless they have more room than they can defend.

If you want to watch them build comb then I'd do 1 frame of brood with eggs /w bees, one of capped brood with pollen w/bees, shake 1 or 2 frames in, and then feed them.  I think your hive is bigger than mine (I have 2 deep + 1 med frames) so you may want to add more.

I love watching them build comb...

Rick
Logged

Rick
Barbara
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 50


Location: Westminster, Maryland


« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2008, 09:13:04 AM »

Observation hives was the topic that was presented at our monthly beekeeping meeting last evening.  The gentleman that gave the presentation, Dr. Dewey Caron, wrote a book about putting together an observation hive.  Here is a link to his website, and the book is listed down in his publications if anyone is interested.  Dr. Caron also spoke for a bit on CCD, and the research that he was participating in.  Very interesting speaker if you ever get a chance to hear him.  Seems that where I live, near Baltimore, Maryland, is in the middle of where a lot of that research is being done. 

http://ag.udel.edu/enwc/faculty/caron.html

I understand they have a great observation hive in Beltsville, about an hours drive from where I live, so I think we are going to plan an outting to see it in the next few weeks.

Barbara

Logged

Barbara
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13475


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2008, 10:38:08 PM »

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesobservationhives.htm
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.153 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page April 04, 2014, 03:55:59 AM
anything