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Author Topic: The Linden Tree aka, Basswood, Lime tree (in England), the bee tree  (Read 1753 times)
tillie
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Location: Atlanta, GA

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« on: April 16, 2008, 12:19:31 PM »

I am so EXCITED.  I have been looking for a silver linden tree ever since I saw one in front of my sister-in-law's knit shop in Natchez, MS.  When I saw her tree in front of the store on a main street in Natchez, it was blooming and actually dripping honey bees.  I have searched the nurseries in Atlanta and in the mountains to no avail.

Finally I found the tree at the National Arbor Foundation and bought three of them.  I'm planning to plant one at my house in Atlanta, one at my place in the mountains and to keep one in a pot to replace whichever one doesn't thrive!

Here's what one looks like (if you don't know it) and a wonderful description.

I can't wait to post bee pictures on the blooms in a couple of years!

Linda T in Atlanta
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http://beekeeperlinda.blogspot.com
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reinbeau
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« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2008, 05:34:40 PM »

Beautiful tree, Linda, and nice find on the website!  I'll be spending some time browsing pages there, I can see!

It's neat to learn about plant families.  Your tree is in the  Mallow Family: Malvaceae, same as hollyhocks!  I love finding those connections.  That's the botany geek in me  Wink
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- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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Cindi
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« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2008, 08:58:51 AM »

Linda, yea! yea! yea!!!  The Linden brings on nectars like nothing on this earth.  Our city of Vancouver plants them all over the place in the downtown core, I think it annoys people because of the liquids that drip on the cars, hee, hee.  I also heard that the Linden tree is a great tree for absorbing toxins and cleans the air.  Or maybe it was that the tree can grow well "breathing" the toxins from the air.  Now I am wondering what is what, hee, hee.....anyways, good for you.  It is wonderful when one finds a plant/bush/tree that they have been yearning for.  That is a beauty. Have the most greatest, awesome day, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
kathyp
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« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2008, 01:33:17 PM »

i did a little research on the tree because i need to replace some stuff this year.  linden trees are not recommended for zone 8-9, which is where i live  sad .  cindi, your weather seems to be much like mine.  will the trees grow there?  cold does not seem to be an issue, so i'm not sure why they wouldn't grow here.
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thomashton
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« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2008, 05:11:37 PM »

I have several small lindens in my home (private) nursery in 10gal pots weighting to go out into the yard. I love them and have one already in the ground planted. They have done really well here in zone 5a. Didn't know they were "bee trees". I just really like them. I have Tilia cordata. What is that? Little leaf linden? can't remember the common name.
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Cindi
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« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2008, 10:48:55 AM »

Kathy, the linden trees grow in our big city really well, (Vancouver) and I know that they also grow here, I have heard a beekeeper telling me that I should get some Linden trees for the bees.  I do not know what zone I live in, I should know that, but I have never bothered.  All I know is that we get lots of rain, can get freezing temperatures, snow, yep, Kathy, I think that it is pretty much like yours too.  I am going to check out what zone I live in.....hold on...... OK, I went to this site, it looks like I am in Zone 8b maybe 8a.

Kathy you say you are in Zone 8-9, I see no reason why the Linden won't grow in your area, that does not make sense.  I wonder if the species of Linden that has been talked about is a more tender one.  I don't know much about Linden, but I imagine there are many cultivars of this species.  Check it out.  Have a most wonderfully great day, Cindi

This is the site for the map that I went to, but it is for Canada:

http://nlwis-snite1.agr.gc.ca/plant67/index.phtml

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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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