Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
November 27, 2014, 06:26:43 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat(1)  

Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Willow, Maple, Cherry, Dandelion...  (Read 3264 times)
Dane Bramage
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 509


Location: Portland, Oregon


« on: April 14, 2008, 10:43:38 PM »

It's a veritable spring banquet for the bees here! 











Couldn't get any decent (close enough) pics of the willow.  They're totally ignoring a nice pear tree in full bloom right near too.  I think they've better options.  So much pollen in the air right now... bee's heaven (allergy sufferer's someplace else  Wink )

Here's the 2nd, new location for some more hive's at my place = the terrace.  cool  I was thinking of a castle + moat motif, but with bee-hives.  grin



Cheers,
Dane





Logged

tillie
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1740


Location: Atlanta, GA

Bee in N Georgia on a Blackberry flower


WWW
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2008, 11:06:20 PM »

Gorgeous pictures - I'm curious - how is it that all of your hives have the same number of boxes? - I have many fewer hives (7) but they don't have the same number of boxes because some are faster builders than others, etc.

Linda T in Atlanta
Logged

http://beekeeperlinda.blogspot.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"You never can tell with bees" - Winnie the Pooh


Click for Atlanta, Georgia Forecast" border="0" height="60" width="468
Pond Creek Farm
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 566


Location: Republic, MO


« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2008, 11:13:42 PM »

Great Pictures.  Now the beginner question:  just how many hives can go in a single yard?  We have 40 acres, mostly forest, but some wild grasses and some row crops in sunflowerm milo and millet?  I  expect three hives this year.  The picture shows many hives, but I am curious if my place will support usch numbers. 
Logged

Brian
poka-bee
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1651


Location: buckley wa

I am NEVER bored!!


WWW
« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2008, 11:14:34 PM »

Beatiful pictures, you have a ton-o-bees there!  I like the mote idea!  Makes me smile to think of a burgler or other no-gooder stumbling over a few hives in the back there..heh hehheh!! evil Well, except for the hurting the bees part  Sad Jody
Logged

I'm covered in Beeesssss!  Eddie Izzard
heaflaw
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 217

Location: lincolnton, nc


« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2008, 11:22:59 PM »

Nice house, nice location & nice set up of hives.
Logged
Dane Bramage
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 509


Location: Portland, Oregon


« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2008, 11:30:31 PM »

Gorgeous pictures - I'm curious - how is it that all of your hives have the same number of boxes? - I have many fewer hives (7) but they don't have the same number of boxes because some are faster builders than others, etc.

Linda T in Atlanta

Thanks Linda,  Smiley  This is "double-deep" country (necessary for winter stores).  So, once they've built up to spec, they're never reduced.  Are your singles from splits, nucs or recent packages or something?   All the new hives I added this year were double-deep and HEAVY with almond nectar.  All splits that I'll be doing (when the weather warms consistently) will be straight switch-outs to double-deeps as well.

I hope you have good rains this year over there!!

Great Pictures.  Now the beginner question:  just how many hives can go in a single yard?  We have 40 acres, mostly forest, but some wild grasses and some row crops in sunflowerm milo and millet?  I  expect three hives this year.  The picture shows many hives, but I am curious if my place will support usch numbers. 
100% dependent upon the nectar flow & strength but I asked that same question and consensus was ~20 colonies before the point of diminishing returns was reached.  I have some kind of crazy nectarlicious location adjacent wetlands.  Last year (my first) I pulled ~4.5 supers off of one hive that was started from a nuc.  The nectar flow is relentless here... blackberries (June-July) are when it gets crazy & purple-loosestrife comes on-line immediately after and lasts until late August.  This year I'm going huge with 100% drawn comb.  I've big hopes.  
Check a satellite view of your locale and draw a 2-3 mile radius to determine the terrain.

Thanks Jody Smiley  No worries... no prowlers here (& if there were the bees would be the least of their worries  evil)

Thanks heaflaw. Smiley

Cheers,
Dane
Logged

wtiger
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 179

Location: East Central Missouri


« Reply #6 on: April 14, 2008, 11:50:30 PM »

Yeh I got my 2 packages and hived them on friday.  It was too cold this weekend, but today it was in the low 50s and the bees were all over the dandelions, doing orientation flights and bring i loads of bright yellow pollen.  It was great too see again.
Logged
bassman1977
"King Bee"
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1787

Location: Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania


« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2008, 12:09:55 AM »

I wonder how many hives it would take to start seeing diminishing returns.  I would thing that with an area such as that, you would be able to put a lot more hives in one location.  What is your thinking on that Dane?
Logged

(\__/)
(='.'=)
(''')_(''')
tillie
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1740


Location: Atlanta, GA

Bee in N Georgia on a Blackberry flower


WWW
« Reply #8 on: April 15, 2008, 12:11:26 AM »

Hi Dane,

I'm hoping for rain continually this year - we've had good rain so far, knock on wood.  I use two brood boxes - usually a deep and a medium, although I'm moving toward all mediums.  I start with just one box and when they've drawn out 8 frames of that, I add the next box.  I have two established hives with different numbers of boxes (one four and one 3) and two swarms - one in a single deep for the moment although I will probably add another box this weekend and the other in two medium boxes.  I have three nucs that I just hived, each in a single box - whether deep or medium.

It sounds like you start with two boxes and I add as the bees draw the comb out - six of one, half dozen of the other, I imagine.

Linda T in Atlanta
Logged

http://beekeeperlinda.blogspot.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"You never can tell with bees" - Winnie the Pooh


Click for Atlanta, Georgia Forecast" border="0" height="60" width="468
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #9 on: April 15, 2008, 12:15:02 AM »

Dane, you are off to that running start!!!  Bees are not overly fond of pear blossoms, other things blooming at the same time that they much more prefer.  YOu have expanded your apiary considerably.  Tell us how many you have now, I am more than curious.  You had honey coming out your ears last year.  Now this year, imagine how much honey you will get.  Did all your colonies come through the winter?  Any losses?  Seems to me I remember you had 10 colonies, right?  Tell us what you are up to all summer long, like you did last year.  I remember that I was thunderstruck by how much honey you got and all your pictures were fantastic.  Beautiful and greatest of days, Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Dane Bramage
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 509


Location: Portland, Oregon


« Reply #10 on: April 15, 2008, 12:40:05 AM »

I wonder how many hives it would take to start seeing diminishing returns.  I would thing that with an area such as that, you would be able to put a lot more hives in one location.  What is your thinking on that Dane?

Nice to hear from ya bassman1977 Smiley  You know, I've really no idea on the magic threshold #.  I know my area has close, unlimited water supply for the bees - the kind of murky (mineral rich) stuff they seem to prefer.  The blackberries are so thick and follow the creek upstream several clicks with massive clusters up the banks and into adjacent areas.  This also was a walnut orchard (quite a few old trees still around) and sort of a transition spot: wetlands, suburbia and farm land (strawberries, raspberries, clover, hazelnut, etc.,) all close by.  I've got 32 colonies so far this year (vs 10 for last year) & may split that up a bit, depending on the swarmyness  Wink.  I'll try to divide them equally between the upper terrace and my deck locale but also could park a few at my other residence, friends, etc., if need be.  I'm just going to find that max hive point through empirical observation I guess.  cheesy

Linda ~> I'll do a little rain dance for you too! Wink  The # of brood chambers depends on how I start.  Last year I nuc'd into a single deep at first and then added as normal.  This year I have my survivors and, nuc and package prices being what they are and available when they are (LATE!) - I decided to expand with full double-deep hives and made a trip down to the Cali almonds to do just that.  Let me tell you, it was a great season in the almonds and these hives were nigh nectar locked.  I'm hoping the cold weather slowed the queens down - "took the swarm outta 'em".


Hi Cindi!  ~> yeah, I'm on it sister!  heh I've been moving so haven't had time (nor computer set-up) to post updates much this year yet.  I lost more hives than I wanted to the elements my first winter.  Sogged right out...  Cry cold wet whipping winds and inadequate ventilation (condensation) & protection are just too much... but I wanted to just "let them be" to see.  Next winter I'll be doing 2 things differently: new, all-season vented inner covers & serious protection from the wind & rains.  The terrace colonies will be moved back and under the balcony, which will be tarped from above with another draping down - just open enough to allow little light + escape but protect from winds and rain.  The deck location get's a 3-sided tent (4th side open opposite of prevailing winds).
Anyways - I'm definitely excited about the nectar flow this year.  I bought loads of drawn frame supers... I was amazed last year at how they produced even getting a late start from nucs with no drawn comb... this year, with the early and running start, I hope to  shocked  & thanks for the info on the pear's desirability.  The blooms smell so lovely to me.  The bees aren't really minding the cherries all that much either, and two of them are directly in front of the terrace hives there.  I put out a bucket of wet cappings (left over from last year, not crystallized tho) and they didn't pay it much mind either. 

woo hoo!

edit ~> forgot to share that the pollen is so thick here it will coat your car straight away.... no use washing unless you hit the road until it dries, it sticks to the wetness.  It's like the entire area has been sprinkled in curry... typical spring here.  Anyone else have crazy spring pollen like this?
« Last Edit: April 15, 2008, 10:41:39 AM by Dane Bramage » Logged

Sean Kelly
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 903


Location: Buckley, Wa

I Pick; Therefore I Grin


WWW
« Reply #11 on: April 15, 2008, 03:33:07 AM »

forgot to share that the pollen is so thick here it will coat your car straight away.... no use washing unless you hit the road until it dries, it sticks to the wetness.  It's like the entire area has been sprinkled in curry... typical spring here.  Anyone else have crazy spring pollen like this?

My wife and I lived in Beaverton for 6 years before moving back up to the Tacoma, WA area last year and I totally remember that darn pollen!  I remember taking my ICE scraper after a light overnight mist hardened the pollen into a dried cake on my windshield!  It was terrible.  We get some good pollen dustings here in Buckley, Wa too but nothing like down in the Portland-Metro area!!!

Sean Kelly
Logged

"My son,  eat  thou honey,  because it is good;  and the honeycomb,  which is sweet  to thy taste"          - Proverbs 24:13
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13903


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #12 on: April 15, 2008, 06:45:06 AM »

>just how many hives can go in a single yard?  We have 40 acres, mostly forest, but some wild grasses and some row crops in sunflowerm milo and millet?

As pointed out, it really doesn't matter what you have.  It matters what is in the 8,000 acres around the bees.  As already stated, around 20 seems to work well in most places, but location is everything.  Some places can't support two.  Some can support a hundred.  So it's really only a ball park figure.  If you increase hives over time and see the bees productivity dropping, and drought or other things don't seem to be to blame, you've probably saturated the area.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfaqs.htm#howmanyhives
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #13 on: April 15, 2008, 09:23:56 AM »

Dane, I remember you posting that you wanted to increase your hive numbers, and that you have done!!!  YEah!!!! Good for you.  I think that you will have so much honey (and those beautiful pictures of your pollen still have me with my mouth hangin' open) that you won't know what to do with it!!  Hee, hee.  I would suggest getting into mead making and selling it on the sly, hee, hee.  You gonna have lots of that golden sunshine comin' your way.  You have the perfect environment, with all that wetland area that you enjoy.  Beautiful, wonderful, what more can ya say.  Have the best of this wonderful day, Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Dane Bramage
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 509


Location: Portland, Oregon


« Reply #14 on: April 15, 2008, 10:28:36 AM »

forgot to share that the pollen is so thick here it will coat your car straight away.... no use washing unless you hit the road until it dries, it sticks to the wetness.  It's like the entire area has been sprinkled in curry... typical spring here.  Anyone else have crazy spring pollen like this?


My wife and I lived in Beaverton for 6 years before moving back up to the Tacoma, WA area last year and I totally remember that darn pollen!  I remember taking my ICE scraper after a light overnight mist hardened the pollen into a dried cake on my windshield!  It was terrible.  We get some good pollen dustings here in Buckley, Wa too but nothing like down in the Portland-Metro area!!!

Sean Kelly


Hahaha that's exactly right!  Pressure-washer is a mandatory tool 'round here.   Wink


>just how many hives can go in a single yard?  We have 40 acres, mostly forest, but some wild grasses and some row crops in sunflowerm milo and millet?

As pointed out, it really doesn't matter what you have.  It matters what is in the 8,000 acres around the bees.  As already stated, around 20 seems to work well in most places, but location is everything.  Some places can't support two.  Some can support a hundred.  So it's really only a ball park figure.  If you increase hives over time and see the bees productivity dropping, and drought or other things don't seem to be to blame, you've probably saturated the area.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfaqs.htm#howmanyhives


That makes a lot of sense and is what I've decided to pursue.  If 40 hives are still cranking I may just leave well enough alone and start breaking nucs and splits off the hives from there.  Warning - hobby outta control!    Wink
Another point to consider is:  how many other beek's colonies are in the forage area?  I've never seen any other hives near here and don't know of any through the various sources (local beek club, farmer's and local markets, aerial surveillance, etc.,.).  One might have an excellent locale but if there are many other beeks nearby, that would factor in (depending on how close & if shared nectar source).

Dane, I remember you posting that you wanted to increase your hive numbers, and that you have done!!!  YEah!!!! Good for you.  I think that you will have so much honey (and those beautiful pictures of your pollen still have me with my mouth hangin' open) that you won't know what to do with it!!  Hee, hee.  I would suggest getting into mead making and selling it on the sly, hee, hee.  You gonna have lots of that golden sunshine comin' your way.  You have the perfect environment, with all that wetland area that you enjoy.  Beautiful, wonderful, what more can ya say.  Have the best of this wonderful day, Cindi


I done did it huh Cindi?  heh - and I may split about 10 hives, depending on how spring goes.  Speaking of which, I really hope we get plenty of sunny warm.  It's been a wild ride so far this spring... 85F in the shade a few days ago, a little hail storm yesterday and 33F this morning (50F high forecast  rolleyes).  I made an improvement down on the bee-deck too (where the other 1/2 of the colonies are located).  Check out my new "honey-house" (30' yurt):
  cool
I'm really wanting to hit the wetlands blackberry flow this year.  People here (including myself, lol) just love that honey (& I'm down to my last little bit that I squirreled away  tongue).

Wishing everyone an excellent season,
Dane
Logged

DayValleyDahlias
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1629


Location: Aptos, California


WWW
« Reply #15 on: April 15, 2008, 12:19:08 PM »

WOW!  That is bee paradise!
Logged


<img src="[url]http://banners.wunderground.com/weathersticker/miniWeather2_both_cond/language/www/US/CA/Aptos.gif
" border=0
alt="Click for Aptos, California Forecast" height=50 width=150>[/url]

"Become vegetarian/vegan, and no one gets hurt"
CBEE
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 343

Location: Northern Kentucky


« Reply #16 on: April 16, 2008, 09:15:00 AM »

Dandelions are in full tilt here but it's odd my bees seem to be paying no attention to them. Must be hitting something else. Plenty of pear and dogwood for them
Logged
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #17 on: April 16, 2008, 09:18:25 AM »

CBEE.  Dandelions are coming into bloom here and will be blooming for a long time yet.  I honestly have never seen a bee on any of my dandelions too, there must be better sources.  So when I hear of how wonderful that dandelions are for the bees, that makes me say,  huh  Beautiful and most wonderfullest day, Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
annette
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 5314


Location: Placerville, California


« Reply #18 on: April 16, 2008, 12:15:33 PM »

Dane

I have a new background photo thanks to your wonderful pics. I used the first one you posted. Just Beautiful

Annette
Logged
Bennettoid
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 352


Location: Ocean City, Maryland, USA


« Reply #19 on: April 16, 2008, 08:38:44 PM »

HEY!!

How about some close ups of the Hottie on the Deck!!!
Logged

Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 1.166 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page November 19, 2014, 08:51:59 PM