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Author Topic: Don't Look At This Post, Its Got Pics Of A 15Yr Old Hive With Queen  (Read 6624 times)
Robo
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« Reply #20 on: March 21, 2008, 06:40:52 AM »

Can bees really live that long?


The bees done live that long,  but a colony can.   Here is a cutout I did last Spring that they claimed had been there 30 years.  I could see evidence of the colony moving over 12 feet across the wall cavity.
http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php?topic=9430.0
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JP
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« Reply #21 on: March 21, 2008, 07:22:54 AM »

Can bees really live that long?


The bees done live that long,  but a colony can.   Here is a cutout I did last Spring that they claimed had been there 30 years.  I could see evidence of the colony moving over 12 feet across the wall cavity.
http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php?topic=9430.0


Hey Rob, that section of triangular comb reminds me of one I did the other day. I will be getting more pics from the home owners soon, so hopefully I can post some of those. I know he took pics through the window of different sections of comb I pulled out including one or two triangular pieces.

I saw this post last yr when you posted it, that's an interesting one you did there to say the least, 30yrs of bees. Whom was living with who?


...JP
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Robo
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« Reply #22 on: March 21, 2008, 08:45:00 AM »

JP,
 
I have no idea how long they were REALLY there.  The people remember them there when they where kids.  For all I know they could have died off and a new swarms moved in as the house had been vacant for quite a few years.  All I know that there where bees there for many years from all the debris.   

I know you have done a lot more removals than me,  but I still find myself in amazement quite often as to what these marvelous creates are capable of.

Have a good one...............
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« Reply #23 on: March 21, 2008, 08:48:38 AM »

Small educational note for those working on plaster lathe walls. It sucks even more than stucco and wire mesh.

The reason being is that the one tool I use a lot to cut openings, the sawzall, is one of the worst tools to use in this case. A circular saw is better but not by much.

The wood planks in a lathe wall vibrate under the effect of a sawzall of jigsaw and crack the wall or ceiling in areas you aren't cutting. Sections of plaster can break loose many feet away from where you are cutting. You can cause a crack to run the entire length of the wall or ceiling if the vibrations catch it in just the right manner. It can make for a very unhappy homeowner. And I am sure you would not be happy either.

In this case a circular saw is the best choice. However it does not guarantee there won't be any issues.

If you do you need to use a composite style blade because it has no teeth and can cut through the plaster better. You will loose teeth (on your blade) if you use a normal blade. The plaster is the substance you have to cut the the lathe boards aren't very thick so they will cut with a composite blade.

Now for another side note. Using a composite blade on wood creates smoke and smell. if the home has a smoke detector it will go off. Not that I would know anything about that.


Strictly for educational purposes. Your results may vary. Allow 6-8 weeks for delivery.

Sincerely,
Brendhan

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JP
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« Reply #24 on: March 21, 2008, 10:18:03 AM »

Small educational note for those working on plaster lathe walls. It sucks even more than stucco and wire mesh.

The reason being is that the one tool I use a lot to cut openings, the sawzall, is one of the worst tools to use in this case. A circular saw is better but not by much.

The wood planks in a lathe wall vibrate under the effect of a sawzall of jigsaw and crack the wall or ceiling in areas you aren't cutting. Sections of plaster can break loose many feet away from where you are cutting. You can cause a crack to run the entire length of the wall or ceiling if the vibrations catch it in just the right manner. It can make for a very unhappy homeowner. And I am sure you would not be happy either.

In this case a circular saw is the best choice. However it does not guarantee there won't be any issues.

If you do you need to use a composite style blade because it has no teeth and can cut through the plaster better. You will loose teeth (on your blade) if you use a normal blade. The plaster is the substance you have to cut the the lathe boards aren't very thick so they will cut with a composite blade.

Now for another side note. Using a composite blade on wood creates smoke and smell. if the home has a smoke detector it will go off. Not that I would know anything about that.


Strictly for educational purposes. Your results may vary. Allow 6-8 weeks for delivery.

Sincerely,
Brendhan



Brendhan, you could not have summed up better what I went through to go through the plaster. I tried the skill saw and it was tough to hold it up to the ceiling and use it without cutting any fingers off, or perhaps a nose, I have other fingers, just one nose, so I grabbed the sawzall. You just reminded me that I need to get new blades, they seem to not hold up that well when cutting through plaster and aged wood runners, that must have been concrete in a past life. Ahhh the smoke! What cut-out would not be complete without a little smoke? If it weren't for the 3mil plastic and heavy blue tarp that was duct taped to the floor, I would swear that after I had finished with this job, the room should have been condemned. The home owner btw well before I bagan this job told me that he was planning on renovating the entire room and that it was perfectly alright to do whatever I had to to remove the bees live. Got to love customers like that. Sure beat the whiny ones that complain you got a speck of honey on their beautiful 1970's green shag carpet, that needed changing out at least two decades ago. Rule #1 on cut-outs, have fun! Yes indeed!

...JP
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« Reply #25 on: March 21, 2008, 12:23:54 PM »

I would love to know what the  mite count is on that hive, since it small cell. It would be very educational and good information for us people trying to regress to small cell.

Annette
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« Reply #26 on: March 21, 2008, 01:49:17 PM »

I would love to know what the  mite count is on that hive, since it small cell. It would be very educational and good information for us people trying to regress to small cell.

Annette

You didn't hear all the feral hives are gone. (MB said something like that with toungue in cheek)

On all the feral hives I have done even those in swarm mode (those have lots of drone cells). My mite count is usually very low. It is hard to do a mite count sine you really can't so a shake off on a feral hive. I do inspect feral hives. I use to be much more critical about it when I first started. All the fear of having AFB, mites or something else come into my bee farm and destroy my hives. But after a while a little light goes on over your head. The feral survivors survive for a reason they are accumulated to dealing with the threats that exist out there.

The worst I see in feral hives is chalkbrood and then very mild instances of it.

The thing is with feral hives if there is an issue. They either don't survive or abscond. That is why when you find those 15 year old hives you start grabbing as much brood larvae as you can feed every last one of them royal jelly and turn into queens and sell them on ebay for millions, thus retiring to Australia a rich man where they have no Varroa. But I digress on mentioning my financial plans.

Most of the feral hives I see have small cell or close to it for their brood. Drone cells, pollen and honey cells vary widely.

Sincerely,
Brendhan

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« Reply #27 on: March 21, 2008, 11:20:20 PM »

Beautiful Pictures.I love ferral bees.I have got six swarms this spring and one cut out.The ferral bees are Booming in Los Angeles
kirko

Oh don't tell the media or the experts the Ferral bees are Booming.Well what do you expect no mitecides no chemicals in the hive natural comb clean wax oh yeah sshh the chemical companies will find out
kirko

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« Reply #28 on: March 22, 2008, 12:00:57 AM »

Wow Jp that is huge. Ya the very first colony I remove from that tree and then they drowned were small amd when I measured the comb is was 4.5. And this last cutout I did they are huge and not at all small cell. When I saw the queen finally Yesterday and saw they are drawing out the foundation she is HUGE. I will have to take my camera out there and try to get a picture of her soon she is also very DARK. That was great that you did not have to do the repairs. I dont do mine or wont but if I was getting paid I would do them. Glad you found the queen and they are in small cell comb and you have that genetics which is worth allot.

Angi


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JP
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« Reply #29 on: March 22, 2008, 12:05:48 AM »

Wow Jp that is huge. Ya the very first colony I remove from that tree and then they drowned were small amd when I measured the comb is was 4.5. And this last cutout I did they are huge and not at all small cell. When I saw the queen finally Yesterday and saw they are drawing out the foundation she is HUGE. I will have to take my camera out there and try to get a picture of her soon she is also very DARK. That was great that you did not have to do the repairs. I dont do mine or wont but if I was getting paid I would do them. Glad you found the queen and they are in small cell comb and you have that genetics which is worth allot.

Angi

Angi, when you described your cut-out, I felt confident you had got your queen, now you have the proof. Dark queens are hard to spot, especially since the norm seems to be golden on ferals. Way to go!

...JP
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« Reply #30 on: March 22, 2008, 12:16:34 AM »


That is why when you find those 15 year old hives you start grabbing as much brood larvae as you can feed every last one of them royal jelly and turn into queens and sell them on ebay for millions, thus retiring to Australia a rich man where they have no Varroa. But I digress on mentioning my financial plans.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
[/quote]

Brendhan Oh my thoughts for sure. I have been wanting to move to Au for years and years since I was a kid. I want to move to QLD into Brisbane Area. Nice mild subtropical area with no frost and no 100+ degree days. Aaaaa to dream. And on the cutout I did there was no mites. And on the drone brood I did not save I opened them up to find no mites. Hopefully it will stay that way. Next week I will start doing PS shakes on them. JP again what a wonderful job you did. I wish I had money to advertise in the phone book/newspaper about doing this but then again I need to buy more hive boxes lol. As I have to pick up 2 4lb packages on the 31st.


Angi
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JP
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« Reply #31 on: March 22, 2008, 12:22:19 AM »

Thank you Angi, and thank you very much for posting about yours, I really enjoyed your stories and your pics. When we tell these stories and post these pics, someone out there is perhaps able to use some of what we have given them as an aid on their next job. Sharing our passion and understandings is what its all about.


...JP
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"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus
and
http://picasaweb.google.com/112138792165178452970

My Youtube videos can be viewed here: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=JPthebeeman&aq=f

My website JPthebeeman.com http://www.jpthebeeman.com/jpthebeeman/
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