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Author Topic: The skunk cabbage, too late for the beautiful emergence, like Ann's picture  (Read 962 times)
Cindi
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« on: March 14, 2008, 09:31:07 AM »

So, Ann(Reinbeau) beat me to the crunch with her early picture of the skunk cabbage, her pictures are the most beautiful example of early emergence of the skunk cabbage.  My skunk cabbage as of a couple of days ago, has long emerged and is showing the yellow flowers.  But holy smokers!!!  I have never seen the skunk cabbage so stunted in growth.  It is only maybe 6 inches tall, the picture does not show this, but it is short.  It normally towers about a foot tall, with the flower just as tall.  The only thing that I could think of that may have stunted growth would have been the extraordinarily cold winter that we have had, the only difference in the many years I have seen these plants, and there are not very many either.  Generally the air is permeated with the stench of this skunk cabbage, I smell nothing in the deep, dark ravine.  Enjoy the pictures.  Have the most beautiful and wonderful day, Cindi





If you want to look at the picture of Reinbow's emerging skunk cabbage, I think the post is in the photo contest, I will post this and then find her post and modify it and put a link to it for you all to look at, they were simply breathtaking photos.

OK, found it, here is the link to the post that Ann put in about her emerging skunk cabbage

http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php?topic=13536.msg97160#msg97160
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
reinbeau
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« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2008, 05:04:04 PM »

From the look of things we have two different types of skunk cabbage.  Eastern Skunk Cabbage, or Symplocarpus foetidus), is what we have here, it is the only species in the genus.  Cindi has posted a beautiful picture of the Western Skunk Cabbage, or Lysichiton americanus.  They are both in the Araceae family.  Thank you for posting this, Cindi, I learn something new every day!  Smiley
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- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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Cindi
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« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2008, 08:49:28 AM »

Ann, I went to a site that showed the Eastern Skunk Cabbage, and it is not even looking like in the same family eh?  I can't believe how beautiful that Eastern skunk cabbage is!!!  Wow!!!!  I am astounded at the beauty of the plant.  And I love the names for the different part of the plants, interesting.

http://www.ct-botanical-society.org/galleries/symplocarpusfoet.html

Have a beautiful and wonderful day, lovin' this life we lead.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2008, 02:23:43 AM »

The areas around the many lakes, streams, and swampy areas here on Fidalgo Island have lots of Skunk Cabbage this time of year.  One spot, about 1/2 mile south of me has a cluster of a doxen or so plants.
'
Cindi, you're right, they do look a mite punny this year.
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Cindi
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« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2008, 09:20:34 AM »

Brian that is interesting that you note that they are small this year too.  I mean really small.  The ones down the ravine are no higher than about 6 inches, usually they are probably topping about 2 feet, or around there.  Any ideas what may have happened with Mother Nature?  I am thinking the unusual amount of cold weather here and snow.  It has rocked my socks!!!  Beautiful day, in this beautiful life.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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