Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
August 02, 2014, 05:39:01 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: 1 2 [3]  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Promoting Beekeeping  (Read 5115 times)
Understudy
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4640


Location: West Palm Beach, Fl


WWW
« Reply #40 on: March 18, 2008, 01:32:21 AM »

We had 70 people signed up for the beginning beekeeping course in Atlanta and then some of them join the organization, but I think we would have more interest continuing if two things happened:

1.  The course ends with talk about poison in the hives and then Africanized honeybees.  Personally I think that scares beekeepers away.  I suggested that they end with the honey harvest,  but they haven't taken my suggestion for two years running.

2.  The meeting immediately after the short course should be appealing to new beekeepers.  Last year in the meeting immediately after the short course, I did a funny slide show/PowerPoint on Bee-ing a Beekeeper.  This year they incorporated my program into the short course and had Keith Fielder talk about requeening in the meeting immediately after the short course - that's too sophisticated for the beginner who needs a meeting on how to build hive boxes and frames, etc.

I think beekeeping organizations have a responsibility to keep the topics in the meetings interesting to beginners - not altogether of course, but at least in the immediate meeting following the short course, the meeting should be focused on the beginner.

On a personal note, I have been trying since November to get my blog approved by the powers that bee in the Master Beekeeping Program in Georgia as a "public service credit"  I got a letter on Friday from Dr. Keith Delaplane (author of the current edition of Dadant's First Lessons in Beekeeping) saying that after looking at the blog they decided that it did indeed meet the requirements for a public service credit (it is now visited by over 175 visitors a day).  Woooo Hoooo  grin grin grin grin grin

Linda T in Atlanta, smiling

An awesome job.

I liked the idea you told me about having first year beekeepers talk about their experiences.

AHB is good for the evening news. Georgia isn't even AHB positive.

Maybe you should run for office with your association?

Sincerely,
Brendhan

Logged

The status is not quo. The world is a mess and I just need to rule it. Dr. Horrible
reinbeau
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2502


Location: Hanson, MA and Lebanon, ME


« Reply #41 on: March 18, 2008, 08:01:51 AM »

We had 70 people signed up for the beginning beekeeping course in Atlanta and then some of them join the organization, but I think we would have more interest continuing if two things happened:

1.  The course ends with talk about poison in the hives and then Africanized honeybees.  Personally I think that scares beekeepers away.  I suggested that they end with the honey harvest,  but they haven't taken my suggestion for two years running.
That is an interesting suggestion, but for us it's the wrong time of year to harvest.

This year we're going to end the course with an actual install, something I think is necessary instead of sending virgin beeks out into the world installing packages all by themselves without a mentor there to guide them.  At least they'll have seen it done once!  I'll never forget our first install, and I can't say it's a totally nice memory, although the outcome was great.

Quote
2.  The meeting immediately after the short course should be appealing to new beekeepers.  Last year in the meeting immediately after the short course, I did a funny slide show/PowerPoint on Bee-ing a Beekeeper.  This year they incorporated my program into the short course and had Keith Fielder talk about requeening in the meeting immediately after the short course - that's too sophisticated for the beginner who needs a meeting on how to build hive boxes and frames, etc.

We encourage the new, first year beeks to speak at the school and relate how things went for them, that's always interesting - and we have our treasurer who gives her firsthand account of bee sting allergic reactions (she can no longer keep bees, her children do it for her).  Not to scare them, but to help make them aware.  We lost a long time member this past year to anaphylactic shock due to bee stings  Cry

We have a room in the building we meet in where we're going to set up a honey room to both demonstrate extractions and to give people with small harvests a place to do their extracting with the group's two extractors.  I'm sure the newbees will be there for the demonstration harvests this fall!

Quote
I think beekeeping organizations have a responsibility to keep the topics in the meetings interesting to beginners - not altogether of course, but at least in the immediate meeting following the short course, the meeting should be focused on the beginner.

This year our club is going to start having programs at each meeting, I'm actually giving a little talk on Wednesday about gardening for bees.  I don't know if you have to specifically cater to beginners, just cater to beeks in general and everyone will get something out of it! 

Quote
On a personal note, I have been trying since November to get my blog approved by the powers that bee in the Master Beekeeping Program in Georgia as a "public service credit"  I got a letter on Friday from Dr. Keith Delaplane (author of the current edition of Dadant's First Lessons in Beekeeping) saying that after looking at the blog they decided that it did indeed meet the requirements for a public service credit (it is now visited by over 175 visitors a day).  Woooo Hoooo  grin grin grin grin grin

Good for you, Linda!  I listed your blog on the Using Internet Resources page I made up to hand out to the bee school students, along with Michael Bush's and a few others.  If anyone is interested in it send me a PM and I'll forward it to you.  It's nothing we all don't know, but for newbees it's a good start in finding quality info on the internet.

Quote
Linda T in Atlanta, smiling
grin
Logged


- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

Click for Hanson, Massachusetts Forecast" border="0" height="150" width="256
tillie
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1740


Location: Atlanta, GA

Bee in N Georgia on a Blackberry flower


WWW
« Reply #42 on: March 18, 2008, 09:20:36 AM »

Boy, Reinbeau,

It sounds like your bee club focuses in a way that I wish ours did.  I'm on the Board of Directors for our club but it is run by a very strong woman and her husband.  They brought the club back from the dead and she is Ga Beekeeper of the Year as a result - well-deserved for what she did in resurrecting the club, but that level of strong hand also means there isn't much room for suggestions.  She has, however, taken several of mine - did give out a list of bee-friendly plants - not at the short course but at the February meeting right afterwards - for example and did let me do my PowerPoint and panel of first year beekeepers for the club and short course.  And she let me put a list of Internet resources in the goody bag that we gave to the participants at the short course.  So I can't complain much in that we have a vibrant and very active club.

We talk about the honey harvest at the short course with a video - (so it doesn't matter that it also isn't the time of year for us to harvest in Georgia, either!)  I've offered but it hasn't been accepted to do a program on harvesting without an extractor (since many beginners don't have one and the idea is intimidating) - in which I'd address crush and strain, cut comb honey, and chunk honey as well as jar-to-jar harvest which is great for kids/scouts/individuals etc., but they filled in the open slot with someone else, oh, well!

We do have, at the end of each meeting about 15 minutes devoted to "What's going on in the hive" in which experienced beeks answer questions for us much less experienced ones and that is very beginner-helpful. 

We have too large a short course (70 some odd people) to do much actual bee work at the course.  The beekeeper for the Atlanta Botanical Garden (where the short course and our meetings are held) offered to have people in the short course come for an inspection of the hives there during the course, but it was decided that the numbers were too large and the participants in the inspection would miss some of the talk portion of the course.

Promoting beekeeping is an ongoing process - which makes it a growing experience for us all along the way.

Linda T in Atlanta
Logged

http://beekeeperlinda.blogspot.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"You never can tell with bees" - Winnie the Pooh


Click for Atlanta, Georgia Forecast" border="0" height="60" width="468
KONASDAD
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2011


Location: Cherry Hill, N.J.


« Reply #43 on: March 18, 2008, 09:49:50 AM »

Our beginners course is doing exactly what you suggest LindaT. They are ending the beginners course w/ extraction(saved frames from last year as its too early here) and some experiences from newer beekeepers(me and others) AND providing phone numbers of each branch presidents at home for questions in emergencies. They do this whether they join NJBA or not. And of course NJBA and Ag Dept are sponsoring 50 new beeks w/ the course and $300 worth of equipment and a nuc included. Sharing these ideas is very needed for our club health collectively. Please keep sharing.


I have also communicated w/ Understudy and borrowed his powerpoint, added some stuff and personalized it for my area of country. Now Robo has a copy and I expect some good changes to be made by him. These are the types of items club members need to share on this forum. The energy, insight, knowledge and ingenuity of many members nevers ceases to amaze me on this forum. You deserve all the credit for your wonderful sight as well. Kudos.
Logged

"The more complex the Mind, the Greater the need for the simplicity of Play".
Kev
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 244


Location: Hoosick Falls, NY


« Reply #44 on: March 18, 2008, 08:18:03 PM »

I used to be a BSA counciller for the beekeeping merit badge but they've discontinued that program. 

Brian, I thought they brought the Beekeeping Merit Badge back. You should check with your council office, because I think it is available for kids to earn even if it not regularly listed as an available badge. They may have to ask the National office. I'm sure it's one that's very rarely done because it's hard. I'm thinking about offering it locally myself.

Another point to think of though: maybe the folks you talk to are being polite. Lots of folks "think" about taking up a hobby as a way to keep a conversation going. They probably are interested, in the same way that I'm interested in antique tractors. I love to talk about them, but I don't think I'm going to go out an buy a 1949 Farmall and start restoring it.

I don't think you're doing anything wrong. Keep talking and try talking with kids. The scouts and 4H is a great idea, but be prepared. Kids today are much more restless than they were even a few years ago. As a scoutmaster I found out that it could get tough to hold their attention beyond 10 minutes. The more you can give them to do, the better time you will have.

Kev
Logged

One could do worse than be a swinger of birches.
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #45 on: March 19, 2008, 09:23:25 AM »

Linda, oooh, you must be a proud woman, you have great accomplishments with your blog, yeah!!! go, girl, go, have a beautiful and wonderfully awesome day, Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Ashlee
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 8


Location: Georgia


« Reply #46 on: March 19, 2008, 01:54:11 PM »

I have been interested for two years and just now starting. I needed time to learn as much as I could before I got them. I'm in the same boat as Dave with not having anyone to show me the art. I'm learning practically everything on my own and by using the internet. I've asked beekeepers around here a few questions but they don't seem too enthusiastic with helping me. They are probably just busy with their  businesses. I'm going to join some bee clubs around my area! However, in the future I'll do my part and try spreading the joy and art of apiculture.
Logged
reinbeau
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2502


Location: Hanson, MA and Lebanon, ME


« Reply #47 on: March 19, 2008, 04:32:02 PM »

Ashlee, welcome!  Yes, this is a great place to learn, we hung around here for awhile before we got our bees!  When you get a chance, go into your profile and fill in your location so people near you can offer more localized advice.  Enjoy your bees!
Logged


- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

Click for Hanson, Massachusetts Forecast" border="0" height="150" width="256
KONASDAD
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2011


Location: Cherry Hill, N.J.


« Reply #48 on: March 19, 2008, 06:36:42 PM »

Ashley, thats how I got started, right here w/ Beemaster's dowloadable how-to. I  thought I was going to have to wait until the foloowing spring to get bees, but through some advice on here I contacted NJBA and than I found bees too. So go out and get your bees
Logged

"The more complex the Mind, the Greater the need for the simplicity of Play".
Pages: 1 2 [3]  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 1.022 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page July 27, 2014, 06:22:04 PM