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Author Topic: Window Boxes  (Read 1515 times)
Beesilly
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« on: March 10, 2008, 06:06:44 PM »

Hello all,
I would like to make a window box filled with small plants that honeybees like. I do have a big garden and all, but this box is going to be under the entrance for my observation hive, and so I would like to be a bit creative with the landing board! I do understand that the bees might not even notice the pollen/nectar right in front of their entrence. Some plants that I have in mind, that i think can live in a window box, are: catnip, aster, marigold, baby's breat, chives, alyssum, poppies, basil, mustard, oregano, anise hyssop(?) and clover. Now if you dont think one of these plants would not live well in a box... please tell me, and if you can think of any other plants that will survive in a window box, could you please tell me? I am not going to cram all of these plants in the box... i will just choose a few. Now that I'm thinking... would this trigger a robbing situation? With the flowers in front of it, and bees coming from many places? Well what do you guys think? Sound good? Or am I just asking for trouble? Undecided Thank you! grin
Have a great day! Smiley
Beesilly
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Cindi
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« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2008, 12:25:52 AM »

Beesilly, I will respond more to your post tomorrow, I have some comments that I would like to make to you.  But first off, I need to know the width, length and depth of the windobox(es).  Depth is very important, as shallow window boxes can dry out really, really fast, some plants can tolerate this, others will die in no time, unless watered all the time, which is not good, on the other hand.  It leaches the nutrients out of the soil.  It is better to water deeply as you can, let it completely dry out and then water really deeply again.

Maybe by the time I get on the computer in the morning you will have replied to this post and I can further assist you by giving some suggestions, Ann is a great gardener, and she may have some very good advice too.

I don't think that you would have to worry about starting a robbing problem.  The amount of plants that you will plant there will probably only attract the bees from the immediate area.  You also need to bear in mind that you want plants that will flower for long periods.  Some of the ones you listed only have a short blooming period, and you would be very disappointed if you were trying to provide nectar/flower all summer long.  Talkin' to you, have a great and wonderful day, be lovin' this life we live.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Beesilly
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« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2008, 06:08:17 PM »

Hello Cindi,
I have just measured the window boxes... they are 11 inches long, 8 inches wide and 5 inches deep (if I added more soil It would fill up to be 7 inches deep). I don't think I could water often, for its right in front of the entrence, and the bees would be everywhere when I open my window. Perhaps in the evening, I could water them, with less trouble.
So what types of plants are long bloomers? And will live in a window box well? I will have to ask some of the family, for many of them know this stuff very well. I am relived to know that this should not cause a robbing problem.
Thank you!
Have a great day!
Beesilly
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MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2008, 11:53:33 PM »

I'd suggest Catmint, and cut up some sponges and mix them into the soil.
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Cindi
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« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2008, 10:02:49 PM »

Beesilly, those window boxes are quite shallow, even with filling up to the 7 inches with soil.  I don't think that any perennials would do well in there.  My advice would be to grow some annuals, which have a much shorter root system.  MrILoveTheAnts had a really good idea bout cutting up some sponge and putting it in the dirt, it would help to retain moisture, the less that you have to water, the better for you, hee, hee, especially given the location of the boxes.  I will resurrect the list that Ann and I had compiled quite some time ago, and see what kind of annuals you may put there.  The list is in this topic, there are many plants there that you can choose from.

I think that in those small window boxes I would go for a short blue Bachelor's Button, they bloom for a long time and they don't get too big, the bees love Bachelor's Buttons (cornflower).  Ask your family for their advice, I bet they will give you more than you need, that is nice to have them for advice, cool.  Have a beautiful and wonderful day, love our life.  Cindi

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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
johnnybigfish
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« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2008, 10:35:38 PM »

hey MrIlovetheants!
Thats so wierd!. I was just fixin' to mention "Catmint" which i just learned about today!
 Is this something thats easy to aquire?
 I'm gonna google it now but I'd liike to hear what you have to say about it.
your friend,
john
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MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2008, 11:30:08 PM »

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v735/mrilovetheants/Ants%202007/Flowers3.jpg
It blooms in mid to late spring, and if cut back in June/July it should come back again. Though I have to say the bees lose interest in it over the year. Thinking back they might be a little big and have no room to expand, and I really only suggested them because they're drought tolerant.
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johnnybigfish
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« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2008, 09:20:02 PM »

Thanks Mrilovetheants!
 I like the drought tolerant part!
your friend,
john
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Beesilly
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« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2008, 10:59:23 PM »

Ahhhh.... I see! Thank you for the sponge tip! I will have to do some more research on this. And find drought-tolerant plants! Annuals too! Thank you for the advice!
Have a great night!
Beesillyy
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